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Old 04-09-2015, 06:44 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by Dawgluver View Post
No advice, but I think yours looks much tastier, Wyshie, IMHO.

It was actually very tasty, I think lemon and chicken go together very well.


I do this absolutely gorgeous (I think anyway) chicken and lemon meatball thing with a yoghurt, mint and preserved lemon sauce.
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Old 04-09-2015, 06:44 PM   #12
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You are correct. The chicken in the book's photo was clearly not cooked in a casserole. It looks baked or roasted to me. The sauce had to be prepared separately. Sauce made from the liquid the chicken cooked in would not be white like that. It would look like your sauce.

I'm curious about who wrote/published that book.
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Old 04-09-2015, 06:47 PM   #13
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Cookery books tell fibs!

Hmm. If you used fond, black pepper, and colored herbs, there would be no way your sauce would be lily-white.

Just saw Andy's post.
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Old 04-09-2015, 07:00 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by Wyshiepoo View Post
I can post the ingredients, but I did this as per the book so it would be an almost exact copy of the authors recipe which I think is a no no?

4 chicken joints (I used pairs of drumsticks)
salt
pepper
tbsp. thyme, lemon thyme if available.
zest and juice of one lemon
I pint (uk) chicken stock
cornflour
double cream

Posting the entire recipe for criticism purposes is a "fair use" under the copyright law.

So post the whole thing. The ingredients really won't explain the difference, except if chicken stock was used to make the sauce it won't be white.
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Old 04-09-2015, 07:13 PM   #15
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Posting the entire recipe for criticism purposes is a "fair use" under the copyright law.

So post the whole thing. The ingredients really won't explain the difference, except if chicken stock was used to make the sauce it won't be white.

Yes, I did wonder if a clear stock might make a difference.



Method.

Place chicken in casserole dish.

Rub salt, pepper and thyme into chicken.

add juice and zest of lemon.

Pour over chicken stock.

cook for one hour at gas 4 180C 350F

drain cooking liquid into saucepan and keep chicken hot.


Apply heat to saucepan.

Add enough cornflour to thicken liquid in saucepan.

Add cream.

Season to taste
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Old 04-09-2015, 07:16 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by Wyshiepoo View Post
It was actually very tasty, I think lemon and chicken go together very well.


I do this absolutely gorgeous (I think anyway) chicken and lemon meatball thing with a yoghurt, mint and preserved lemon sauce.
This is the key for me. If it tastes good, I don't worry about any differences in appearance from how it looks in a photo shoot. When you see what they do to make things look more appetizing in pictures, you quickly realize that that this is not the goal you should be seeking with your cooking. Go for the flavor and let appearance fall where it may.
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Old 04-09-2015, 07:48 PM   #17
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This is the key for me. If it tastes good, I don't worry about any differences in appearance from how it looks in a photo shoot. When you see what they do to make things look more appetizing in pictures, you quickly realize that that this is not the goal you should be seeking with your cooking. Go for the flavor and let appearance fall where it may.
Making foods look better than they are is often done for TV and print ads. They do things that have nothing to do with actual food.

Photos in cook books are a different story in my mind. They should be representative of what the recipe creates. Imagine a first time cook making this recipe and being upset because (s)he did something wrong.
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Old 04-09-2015, 09:38 PM   #18
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Where is CWS when we need her. She does styling for a living. And she creates recipes also.

Actually your sauce looks more like reality. Your sauce looks like you got the fond from the bottom of the pan. And that is where the flavor is. So I wouldn't worry. I would rather have flavor over appearance any day.

I had a friend a number of years back. She was a food stylist. I asked her how come my steaks don't look like the pictures. She told me after the picture is taken the steak is thrown out. The grill marks are made with a product we have here called Gravy Master or Kitchen Bouquet. They use that as a paint to paint on the grill marks. Then the raw steak is painted with watered down Gravy Master to make it look like it has been done to medium rare. The next step is to smear Vaseline all over the steak to make it look juicy and that a pat of butter had melted. Next a lit cigarette or two are placed behind so it looks like it has just come off the grill.

Her advice was to ignore the pictures and look at the recipe. If you have the ingredients, it sounds like something you can make and has the flavors you enjoy, then make the dish. And enjoy all your efforts while learning a new dish. Who knows. It may become the dish everyone likes when they come to your home. And that is what your dish looks like. I want to come to your house for that dish. Yum!

You sound like an adventurous cook. Some folks will only cook the foods they ate as a child and are not willing to take even a bite of a new dish. What a loss for them.
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Old 04-09-2015, 10:07 PM   #19
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Cookery books tell fibs!

I'm puzzled, Wyshie. Your dish looks so much better than the one from the cookbook. I'd much prefer your gravy to that pallid white stuff, at least I would know it had flavor. That said, I would agree with others, there's some sauce "beautification" going on in the book pic.

I also wonder if there was some cheesecloth or other strainage going on with the book sauce.
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Old 04-09-2015, 10:50 PM   #20
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Well I think that is dishonest.

I also have one book called 500 recipes in 20 minutes, the recipes I've tried from there have been very good, but 20 minutes? You're having a laugh!
You have to remember that the recipes are developed by people who have knife skills, organize their ingredients, have the tools, etc. It is sort of like home renovations. They always take more time than you think. When I test drive a recipe for publication, I recruit a friend to come over to handle the prep work--preferably a friend who has not worked in a professional kitchen. That gives me a real sense of how long it really takes for the average home cook to prepare the recipe.

Totally off topic, but last fall I had to prepare a lobster-crab-pickled mussel dish for the food photographer. With three of us doing all the prep, etc., it took us 2.5 hours to get from raw ingredients to plating. This was something the Chef indicated took 45 minutes. Longest 45 minutes in the kitchen I've spent to date.
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