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Old 03-29-2019, 12:49 PM   #11
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Masa harina is the finer ground one. Grits are usually coarse, like polenta, some coarser than others. I think the "quick" hominy grits are finer than the regular, which is very coarse. It's all precooked, in the nixtamalization process, so that's not what makes them quick, as with bulghur.
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Old 03-29-2019, 10:50 PM   #12
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I think we could help you better if you shared why this question is important to you?

I am just trying to learn what the different variations of cornmeal are available.
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Old 03-29-2019, 11:57 PM   #13
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I am just trying to learn what the different variations of cornmeal are available.
I think that the answers are mostly there in this thread, but you may have to weed through the rest of us muddying up the water.

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Old 03-30-2019, 12:12 AM   #14
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Not to mention each manufacturer will put their own spin on various names
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Old 03-30-2019, 04:46 AM   #15
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New to this message board. Above I don't see how I can respond to responses.
Click on the "quote" button. A window will open at the bottom. It will have what you want to respond to at the bottom of the page. When you are done, click on the "submit reply" button.
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Old 03-30-2019, 11:21 AM   #16
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Masa harina is the finer ground one. Grits are usually coarse, like polenta, some coarser than others. I think the "quick" hominy grits are finer than the regular, which is very coarse. It's all precooked, in the nixtamalization process, so that's not what makes them quick, as with bulghur.

Do quick grits have less nutritional value than regular grits?
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Old 03-30-2019, 03:01 PM   #17
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Not an answer, but this video just hit YouTube, and it shows the Nixtamalization process used to make fresh masa for tortillas. I was amazed at how flexible and stretchy the tortillas turn out when made this way.



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The best tacos I ever had were at a place called The Treat in Great Falls, Montana, many years ago. They made their own tortillas, and they were flexible rather than crisp. I hate when a tortilla crumbles into a handful of chips and filling with the first bite.

These ones at The Treat had a tender but sort of leathery texture - you could wrap and hold them together right to the last bite, but they were real corn tortillas, not flour. They had very good homemade hot sauce too, really unexpected in central Montana back in the '60s. There were no other Mexican foods in town.

That was the first Mexican restaurant I ever ate at. Where I grew up in Minnesota, they had never heard of Mexican as a food genre back then.
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Old 03-30-2019, 04:23 PM   #18
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I too am a fan of the pliable tortillas. We have many stores that make their own. I love to buy a package of about ten and saute them in butter. I am not a bread eater, so these tortillas hit the spot. And excellent replacement for the bread.

I have a package of them in the fridge right now. And my daughter for my birthday, bought me a large container of lobster claws. I am torn between using the tortillas or making the tradition roll with a hot dog bun. I already have the lobster meat mixed with mayo, celery and onion. All it is waiting for is the container to put it in. I just might make one of each.
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