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Old 05-01-2007, 07:23 AM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jpmcgrew
I started my tomatoes(seeds) a couple of months ago in my house in a sunny window in Northern New Mexico 7500 ft and plan on putting them in large containers in my little 8x10 green house .They are at least 11 inches tall I will plant tall stems deep to get deep rootsI also have a small heater in green house and dont hafto worry about frost.It is still less then below 35 degrees but heater maybe only gets it up to 45- 50 degrees at night and the green house can heat up to 80-85 when the sun is out without heater . However I dont know how cold the young plants can take with out killing them. Any thoughts?
I looked at my notes from last year and all I noted on May 22 and May 23 was FROST! FROST! I did not note the temps, but I also did not call it a freeze, so I am guessing the temp was 34*, 33*, or 32*F. It killed my tomato plants to soil level, with 1/3 of them never recovering, or was it 2/3rd? not recovering ? Whatever, I was in a pickle. The sole potato plant that did not get covered was killed to soil level too.

Okay GW, we are waiting to learn why 65 tomato plants . I was embarrassed to say I have 45 plants .

15 San Marzano for canning
15 Pink Beauty for juice
15 Juilet, paste tomato for canning sauces.
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Old 05-01-2007, 07:54 AM   #22
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I purchaced a seed starter kit that came with 75 peat pellets and a little plastic greenhouse container with depressions for each of the pelets. I also bought a container of mixed seeds, all heirloom, with yellow, black, striped, pink, and a ocuple other colors of tomatoes. I've always purchased particular strains, but this year, just felt adventurous. I believe I'll be canning tomatoes this year. So far, the count is up to 67 of the seeds that have started growing out of the 75 planted.

I'll be planting yellow crookneck squash, and a couple varieties of purple beens, along with some field beans. I've got purple and black carrots and a carrot seed strip to plant as well. In the front yard, my strawberry plants are doing nicely and the choke cherrie trees are leafing out, along with the raspberries. The artic kiwi plants look like they're ready to start budding, as are the blueberry plants. I just hope we get good rain this year.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 05-01-2007, 10:17 AM   #23
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I have always used Miracle Grow Potting Mix to start my tomatoes and have never had a problem.My seeds alway sprout within 3-5 days I water them with warm water I think thats what makes them sprout so well.Im lucky as I have a huge window in kitchen where the sun hits it all day.A friend gave me this big rolling rack like they use in the meat market I then cover it it with a clear plastic making it into a green house type so they stay nice and warm until Im ready to put them in the outside green house.
My problem is the growing season is short which is why I started early this year if I dont I wont get fruit till the end of August.
Funny thing is last year I got tomatoes well into december they exploded with fruit how I dont know how as it got soo cold at night and the little heater cant keep it that warm.
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Old 05-01-2007, 10:56 AM   #24
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The way things have been going around here, the massive garden I planned probably won't take place.

I'll probably end up doing some large deck containers of tomatoes, peppers, & eggplants, along with the usual herbs, & perhaps plan for a fall garden. Temps & bugs are easier to deal with then anyway.
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Old 05-01-2007, 11:12 AM   #25
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I bought those little peat pellots and started early. When the weather warmed, I put them outside. THEY ALL DIED. I had two dozen plants: mostly herbs, but also squash, cukes, etc. I missed watering them for ONE day (Sunday, the day my dog was found). I will not bother to do this again. Seedlings will show up next week or so. I did plant my lettuce garden, and hope it fares better.

I enlarged my tomato garden so that three plants will have more room. I have another spot for one more. That gives us plenty of tomatoes, plus some to give away.
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Old 05-01-2007, 05:28 PM   #26
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Where I always run into problems is that I get impatient. I always seem to put the plants out for too long and the intense daytime sun kills them . Teh packages always recommend placing the plants outside for only a half hour or so, and gradually increasing the exposure time so that the plants get used to full sun. I will be patient this year.

Maybe I'll plant the carrots tonight. That would be a good thing.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 05-01-2007, 05:41 PM   #27
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Boy, you guys are ambitious and hard working. I can't stand dealing with the bugs and fertilizers and etc. But many folks get great satisfaction from digging in the dirt all season - not to be laughed at.

I take the lazy way out and grow perennials and buy the fresh veggies at the farm stand or the store.
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Old 05-02-2007, 04:17 AM   #28
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I decided when I moved here to buy seedlings and try almost nothing from seed. This year really proved that I should have stuck to that decision.

One thing I absolutely could NOT grow in Florida or Hawaii was large tomatoes (in both places I could grow cherry tomatoes, sweet 100s), and I love growing them here (I like Early Girls because our season is short). I've always kept an herb garden if I owned a patch of dirt.
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Old 05-02-2007, 05:01 AM   #29
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I foolishly under-sowed the basil, so I've got to get another batch going. They'll hit still hit full size, though. Another year's worth of frozen pesto!

Also got to take cuttings from the potted oregano in the basement, as the one I left outside didn't make it through the winter.
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