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Old 10-22-2014, 04:44 PM   #1
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Home curries

Has anybody noticed that home curries always turn out rather watery?

Is there a solution?

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Old 10-22-2014, 04:49 PM   #2
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Never noticed that, and not having seen your recipe(s) I couldn't begin to guess why. Maybe you could post one?
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Old 10-22-2014, 04:53 PM   #3
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BBC - Food - Recipes : Slow cooker beef curry

Thanks.
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Old 10-22-2014, 05:13 PM   #4
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If your curries look watery, do the last part of the cooking with the lid off so some of the water will evaporate.
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Old 10-22-2014, 05:18 PM   #5
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Hi

I have tried that. I have never found it works though. This is a slow cooker recipe though anyway
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Old 10-22-2014, 05:19 PM   #6
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The recipe you posted is prepared in a slow cooker. That might be part of the problem. As it cooks, any juice or fat that is released from the meat will contribute to the overall liquid in the dish, rather than evaporating as it would in a stove top skillet/pan.

Typically when I make a curry and the consistency is thin, I'll remove the cover and let it reduce a bit. That isn't an option with a slow cooker because that isn't the way they are designed to work.

For the specific recipe you posted, I would suggest using a leaner cut of meat. You might also want to drain the tomatoes, as well as use Greek style yogurt, which has a thicker consistency.

Or you could always eliminate the slow cooker and try a more traditionally prepared recipe. Perhaps something like this one:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/ar...ef_curry_90850
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Old 10-22-2014, 05:27 PM   #7
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Thanks.

I have tried home made curries otherwise than in a slow cooker but I still don't get the consistency you get in a restaurant.

Can you cook in Greek yogurt for long?

I was really hoping to find slow cooker recipes though.
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Old 10-23-2014, 10:27 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jomo1972 View Post
Hi

I have tried that. I have never found it works though. This is a slow cooker recipe though anyway
Most slow cooker books suggest using less liquid that you would in any other cooking method because you don't get the same evaporation.

Some "curry" dishes are supposed to have runnier sauce but it shouldn't taste watery. I'd suggest you use less water than your recipe says but be prepared to add more as you go along..

As for cooking with yoghourt - it's inclined to split so better added at the end unless you stabilise it with flour or corn starch - useful article here

http://www.foodrepublic.com/2012/09/...g-greek-yogurt

Lentils are used in some curry recipes both for protein and for thickening. Likewise coconut and ground almonds. You might have had these in Indian restaurants
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Old 10-23-2014, 10:49 AM   #9
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Point 4 of this recipe tells you to press the ingredients down so they are covered by the liquid which suggests there isn't a lot of liquid.
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Old 10-24-2014, 04:14 PM   #10
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Put the slow-cooker lid on only partially, to allow some of the moisture to escape.

Recently, I made a sauce and only put the lid on roughly half way. It thickened up nicely compared to the last time I made it.
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