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Old 01-15-2013, 03:03 PM   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by roadfix View Post
I crave for more salt on hot, sweaty days.
Are the days hot and sweaty or are you?
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Old 01-15-2013, 03:57 PM   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
Are the days hot and sweaty or are you?
Humid days and one sweaty body.
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Old 01-15-2013, 04:01 PM   #33
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I never add salt when cooking rice . I am usually cooking it to accompany something that's full of flavour like a curry so the rice doesn't need salt. It cooks fine. I also always use brown rice, such a nice nutty texture .
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Old 01-15-2013, 04:24 PM   #34
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I never add salt when cooking rice . I am usually cooking it to accompany something that's full of flavour like a curry so the rice doesn't need salt. It cooks fine.
This.
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Old 01-15-2013, 04:35 PM   #35
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A friend who has high blood pressure was staying with us, so I decided to leave out the salt when cooking brown basmati rice. I did this several times before I realized that was probably the reason the rice was slightly sticky. I had been scratching my head, trying to figure out why. I have been cooking brown rice in the same pot for 35 years and this had never happened before. Eventually I figured out it might be the fact that I wasn't adding salt. I tried with salt again and no more slight stickiness. That was true even with only 1/4 tsp of salt for 2 cups of dry rice.
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Old 01-15-2013, 05:55 PM   #36
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We often make rice in advance of the dish which it accompanies. Last night we toasted / fried some basmati in a little peanut oil for some 3 minutes (no salt added), added some meat stock, brought to a simmer, cooked covered for 9.5 minutes, removed from heat source and let it sit covered for 10 minutes while the stir fry which it was to accompany was cooked. The resulting rice was neither pasty nor gummy. The grains of rice were fully cooked but retained their individual identity, which is the way I like rice unless I'm trying to pick it up (and shovel it in) with chop sticks or eat it in a tomato sauce baked dish.
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Old 01-15-2013, 07:39 PM   #37
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This isn't an all or nothing situation.

You CAN cook rice without salt. You CAN season it at the table. It may not be the best way.

It has been shown that food cooked with salt tastes better than food that is salted only after cooking.

I season the cooking liquid for rice so it cooks salted and I season it at the table because I recognize that everyone's taste for salt is different. I use more than my SO.

I don't make rigid rules about seasoning food at the table. A chef in a restaurant has to walk a fine line. He has to make tasty food so he adds salt in the kitchen but he may not add as much as he thinks is needed because he knows there are customers that would complain. It has often been said you can add more salt but you can't subtract salt (even with a potato).
I figure the food is properly seasoned when there's just enough salt to where it enhances the food, but you can't overtly taste the salt. It's no coincidence that the places where I don't feel the food needs any more seasoning are typically $40+ per plate.
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Old 01-16-2013, 02:29 AM   #38
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Maybe as I live somewhere where getting hot and sweaty rarely happens (steady now) so I don't need extra salt .

Flippin brass monkeys here today .
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Old 01-16-2013, 06:56 AM   #39
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I'm one of those who has several kinds of rice on hand. Basmati, Jasmine, Calrose, in the summer converted (it is great for rice salads), When I first moved here you couldn't buy the kind of rice you need to make risotto, so I learned to make it with Calrose, and it works fine. Calrose was the rice just about everyone used in their daily rice cookers when I lived in Hawaii. I never had a rice cooker, but more or less learned to cook rice with it and it is my general purpose rice. In Hawaii they sold it in 20 lb bags! Jasmine for Thai and other southeast Asian dishes. Basmati, of course, for Indian. The latter two are very frangrant, it is a joy just to smell them cooking.
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