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Old 02-17-2015, 12:21 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by Roll_Bones View Post
I learned a few things from my mother too. Then I learned her way was not always the right way.
Sorry, I have been taught to not do this. That a roux or reduction is the right way to thicken. I was taught to never use flour and water.
I will try the flour and water shake up method, but if I end up with lumps, I know who to blame.....
RB, put a drop or two of Gravy Master in your slurry before you shake it. You will see if you have any flour that has not blended in.
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Old 02-17-2015, 12:28 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roll_Bones View Post
I learned a few things from my mother too. Then I learned her way was not always the right way.
Sorry, I have been taught to not do this. That a roux or reduction is the right way to thicken. I was taught to never use flour and water.
I will try the flour and water shake up method, but if I end up with lumps, I know who to blame.....
Quote:
Originally Posted by Addie View Post
RB, put a drop or two of Gravy Master in your slurry before you shake it. You will see if you have any flour that has not blended in.
Another hint is to add the slurry slowly, whisking as you pour to thoroughly mix it into your broth.
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Old 02-17-2015, 01:00 PM   #23
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A slurry using potato starch and liquid.
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Old 02-17-2015, 01:19 PM   #24
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Originally Posted by Addie View Post
When you have a houseful of kids clammering to eat, you use the method that is the fast way to get it on the table. And I am not talking canned convenience foods. I have always cooked from scratch and will continue to do so. Sure I have the time now to go slow, but I am the one who is clammering to eat. now
Got all those T-shirts. Six kids all under twelve at one time.
I'm not trying to come across as 'superior' in the way.
I'm blessed to be able to follow my hobby. It's classic French home cooking mixed with some 'haute cuisine'.
I only put up info that I genuinely think may be of some benefit to the home cook.
Little tips like dextrinizing the flour makes such a difference to the final dish. It only takes a couple of minutes.
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Old 02-17-2015, 02:03 PM   #25
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Originally Posted by puffin3 View Post
Got all those T-shirts. Six kids all under twelve at one time.
I'm not trying to come across as 'superior' in the way.
I'm blessed to be able to follow my hobby. It's classic French home cooking mixed with some 'haute cuisine'.
I only put up info that I genuinely think may be of some benefit to the home cook.
Little tips like dextrinizing the flour makes such a difference to the final dish. It only takes a couple of minutes.
My sister used to make gravy like you do. But then she didn't have as many kids as me.

If they were all under 12 at the same time, they probably were all teenagers at the same time. Good Luck!
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Old 02-17-2015, 02:36 PM   #26
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Butter, flour, whisk in hand and lots of determination! Go for it!!!
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Old 02-17-2015, 02:48 PM   #27
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I usually do it my Mom's way too, with the flour/water (sometimes broth/stock) slurry. I enjoy cooking "authentic" when I have time, other times I take shortcuts. There are times I must get the food on the table NOW because my blood sugar is dropping, resulting in one extremely crabby cook ready to toss things around. During those times, slurry is perfectly divine!

I never have lumps in my gravy. I bring the pan juices to a boil, then whisk like I'm mad about something as I drizzle in the liquid.
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Old 02-17-2015, 04:21 PM   #28
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I've seen some people on TV use blenders or food processors to make their gravy. I have always thought that was far more trouble than it was worth. Does anyone has any experience with that method?
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Old 02-17-2015, 05:33 PM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by puffin3 View Post
Got all those T-shirts. Six kids all under twelve at one time.
I'm not trying to come across as 'superior' in the way.
I'm blessed to be able to follow my hobby. It's classic French home cooking mixed with some 'haute cuisine'.
I only put up info that I genuinely think may be of some benefit to the home cook.
Little tips like dextrinizing the flour makes such a difference to the final dish. It only takes a couple of minutes.
What is "dextrinizing the flour"? I expect I do know what it is, I just don't know it by this name. (And I may not be alone.)
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Old 02-17-2015, 10:42 PM   #30
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What is "dextrinizing the flour"? I expect I do know what it is, I just don't know it by this name. (And I may not be alone.)
It means toasting the flour. I think it's fussy and adds a slight taste to gravy that's not unpleasant but ... Made it taste different somehow.

I tried it once or twice but didn't see the benefit.
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