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Old 12-06-2008, 07:52 PM   #21
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While trans fats do occur naturally in animal fats, I believe I read that the trans fats created in the hydrogenation process are still worse/different.
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Old 08-03-2009, 02:46 AM   #22
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Tenderflake lard in 454 and 1.36kg size is now non-hydrogenated. Made a blueberry pie with it the other day and it turned out great! Nice and flaky. Just use the recipe on the packaging.

This site won't allow me to post their website. Just google 'tenderflake' it's the first link.
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Old 08-03-2009, 06:43 AM   #23
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Crisco does make a shortening that is supposedly trans fat free... I've yet to try it though.
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Old 09-22-2009, 12:40 PM   #24
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dumb question

Can you substitute lard for shortening measure for measure?
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Old 09-22-2009, 01:16 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by juliet44 View Post
Can you substitute lard for shortening measure for measure?

Yes. You can sub one-for-one.
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Old 09-22-2009, 01:37 PM   #26
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The product you're looking for is known as "leaf lard." It's sold in butcher shops and some specialty stores. I get mine from a farmer at the Union Square Greenmarket in New York.

The leaf lard I buy has to be rendered, which is easy enough to do, and then it keeps indefinitely in the fridge. Leaf lard comes from the area around the kidneys and is VERY white. It's supposed to be the best quality.

I use it for biscuits and pie crusts.
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Old 09-23-2009, 11:38 AM   #27
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I get my leaf lard from a nearby Amish grocery. They render it themselves. It lasts a long time in the refrigerator, but is not shelf stable like hydrogenated lard.
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