"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > General Cooking
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 05-20-2005, 08:04 PM   #1
Senior Cook
 
oldcoot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: USA,California
Posts: 487
The Parsleys

I'm familiar with three types of parsley, and enjoy each.

First, there's Chinese parsley, aka Coriander or Cilantro. Very pungent, very unique flavor.

Then there's the old standby, Curled leaf parsley. Often thought of merely as a garnish, personally it is my favorite parsley flavor. Strong but not overwhelming, refreshing.

And last but not least, Flat leaf or Italian parsley. Much weaker flavor than the first two, and that flavor is also rather unique.

All three are in my garden, and B/W and I use them as recipes suggest. I find them often indispensible for some dishes.

How do you feel about 'em???

__________________

__________________
oldcoot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-20-2005, 08:40 PM   #2
Hospitality Queen
 
jkath's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Southern California
Posts: 11,448
I love them too, coot.
I especially love the regular old parsley minced in with my manicotti filling. It gives it just the right flavor, along with nutmeg stirred in.

I adore cilantro! I put it in my salsas for a perfect combo.

As for italian, I can't remember if I've had it or not
__________________

__________________
Come visit my foodie blog: www.SockmonkeysKitchen.com
This week's topic: Pinterest and Potatoes
jkath is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-20-2005, 10:05 PM   #3
 
HanArt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Louisiana
Posts: 272
It may be called Chinese parsley, but the flavor is entirely different than flat leaf or curly.

I grow both flat leaf and curly (cilantro bolts too quickly), but prefer flat leaf for cooking. The main reason I grow them is because they're a food source for the parsley worm (future Eastern Black Swallowtail butterfly).
__________________
HanArt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-20-2005, 11:36 PM   #4
Senior Cook
 
oldcoot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: USA,California
Posts: 487
True - cilantro bolts and flowers rather qickly, but it also re-seeds itself and so it is easy enough to have young plants available most anytime. Incidently, the leaves have the same flavor even though the shape changes drastically, and those leaves remain useful all through the bloom time, which is extensive. My patch has been in bloom for nearly a month, now. Attractive white flower clusters. And easier to grow that "regular" parsely.
__________________
oldcoot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-21-2005, 02:15 AM   #5
Master Chef
 
Michael in FtW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 6,592
Cilantro, compared to curley leaf and flat leaf parsleys, have only two things in common - they are green and are called parsley.

While I "might" sub curley for flat leaf (or vice versa) with adjustments for the differences in their intensity - I would never sub cilantro for either.

One nice thing about all three, when used as a garnish - if you eat the garnish after the meal ... they all 3 work to clean your breath.
__________________
"It ain't what you don't know that gets you in trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so." - Mark Twain
Michael in FtW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-21-2005, 09:00 AM   #6
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Scotland
Posts: 2,977
In the UK, we call the leaf of what you term 'cilantro' as coriander. I know that dried coriander is from the seeds. I use a lot of coriander in Indian and Singaporean type dishes and for carrot and coriander soups. I buy it in huge bunches from an Indian grocer, just round the corner from my home. I also think it acts as a good airfreshener in my kitchen - and I like it much more than the phony smell of canned airfreshener or pot-pourri!

I only use flat leaf parsley - the tighter curly parsley can often get quite muddy from the rains we get (even through our 'summer' months) and takes ages to wash before chopping. I have never been able to ascertain any difference in flavouring between the curly and flat leaf varieties. However, I would never use coriander where a recipe calls for parsley - they may look similar, but the flavours are too 'different' to substitute one for another.
__________________
Ishbel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-21-2005, 12:35 PM   #7
Hospitality Queen
 
jkath's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Southern California
Posts: 11,448
Ishbel, what a great idea for using coriander seeds to freshen your kitchen! I love that smell! I keep my seeds in one of those big wooden pepper mills, and grind them onto this and that. When the mill's freshly used, it does smell heavenly!
__________________
Come visit my foodie blog: www.SockmonkeysKitchen.com
This week's topic: Pinterest and Potatoes
jkath is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-21-2005, 05:30 PM   #8
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Scotland
Posts: 2,977
I use the leaf coriander for its airfreshening properties, but I'm going to have a go with the seeds.... Thanks for the suggestion!
__________________
Ishbel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-22-2005, 12:53 AM   #9
Hospitality Queen
 
jkath's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Southern California
Posts: 11,448
noooooo thank you!!!
__________________
Come visit my foodie blog: www.SockmonkeysKitchen.com
This week's topic: Pinterest and Potatoes
jkath is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-22-2005, 02:57 AM   #10
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: UK
Posts: 6
Fresh Coriander

One of the great benefits of our "global village" is that what used to be rare ingredients are now plentiful. In East London the Asian community settled some 30 years ago with them they brought their own stores and that dream ingredient fresh coriander. A unique and fresh flavour all of its own. Chopped into some good quality olive oil and with a little fresh lemon makes a lovely dressing.
__________________

__________________
bilboben is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:39 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.