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Old 10-24-2011, 09:22 AM   #11
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When you roast the bones, the marrow is what makes the gelatin, so when you chill it to remove the fat, the "underpart" (the stock) is gelatin, not liquid. I used to make "stock" on the stove top and always found it lacking in flavor. A friend who is a chef told me to brown the bones and then roast them in the oven...the difference in the richness re: the flavor was amazing (She also told me to remove all the meat off the turkey/chicken carcass and put the bones back in the roaster pan, but to crack the big bones). She also said if I wanted to make a rich stock from poultry without having roasted the bird, to buy wings or backs, save the chicken bones from other meals, brown the wings and backs, and then put those and the pan drippings (the bones, wings, backs) in the roaster. She also recommended the pickling spice and fennel. It really makes a difference re: poultry stock. If I must say so myself, the stock I now make is very rich in flavor and I don't have to cheat and add boullion to up the flavor. The lamb stock is chilling in the fridge now--I can hardly wait to make Scotch Broth!
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Old 10-24-2011, 09:56 AM   #12
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From Food Dictionary

broth

brawth,broth
noun
1.
thin soup of concentrated meat or fish stock.
2.
water that has been boiled with meat, fish, vegetables, or barley.

Stock
1. A liquid or broth in which meat, fish, bones, or vegetables have been simmered for a longtime


From Epicurious Dictionary:

stock
In the most basic terms, stock is the strained liquid that is the result of cooking vegetables, meat or fish and other seasoning ingredients in water. A brown stock is made by browning bones, vegetables and other ingredients before they're cooked in the liquid. Most soups begin with a stock of some kind, and many sauces are based on REDUCED stocks.
© Copyright Barron's Educational Services, Inc. 1995 based on THE FOOD LOVER'S COMPANION, 2nd edition, by Sharon Tyler Herbst.

broth
A liquid resulting from cooking vegetables, meat or fish in water. The term is sometimes used synonymously with bouillon .
© Copyright Barron's Educational Services, Inc. 1995 based on THE FOOD LOVER'S COMPANION, 2nd edition, by Sharon Tyler Herbst


From Miriam Webster Online Dictionary;

broth

noun\ˈbrȯth\
pluralbroths \ˈbrȯths, ˈbrȯthz\
Definition of BROTH

1
: liquid in which meat, fish, cereal grains, or vegetables have been cooked : stock <chicken broth>
2
: a fluid culture medium
See broth defined for English-language learners »
See broth defined for kids »
Origin of BROTH

Middle English, from Old English; akin to Old High German brod broth, Old English brēowan to brew — more at brew
First Known Use: before 12th century

10
a: liquid in which meat, fish, or vegetables have been simmered that is used as a basis for soup, gravy, or sauce

From the above listed definitions, it becomes clear that stock and broth can be used interchangeably. The main difference appears to be what the flavored liquid will be used for. That is, broth is the final product, or one step from being a soup. Stock is the flavored liquid used as a starting point for making consume, soup, or various small sauces. I believe brown stock would be used, for instance, for making Sauce Espaniole, or for making demi-glace, or various gravies.

That’s my take on what the definitions from respected sources tell me. Of course, more concise definitions may be found outside the limited sources I used.

Tip: Did you know that ground beef can be used to make wonderful stock? Simply place the ground beef into a pot'pan that can be covered. Season, then brown the meat on one side, as if you were cooking a burger. Flip in and brown the other side. Break up the meat and cover the pan. Let the pan simmer over mediuim-low heat for 15 to 20 minutes. Pour off the liquid. Finish browning the ground beef and use it for your meal. Place the liquid into the fridge and let sit overnight. The fat will have risen to the top and hardened, making it easy to remove. Throw away the hardened fat. The remaining aspic tastes like the drippings from a perfectly cooked beef roast and can be used to make gravies, sauces, soups, etc.

What has happened is that the water from the meat was trapped by the lid, instead of evaporating into the air. It condenses and drips back into the pan, where it dissolves the fond that usually develops on a cooking surface when cooking meat. Also, the collagen from the connecting tissue (that's ground up into the meat) has been dissolved, giving you the rich gel that we call an aspic.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 10-24-2011, 10:47 AM   #13
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Wow
Thanks for the detailed answer!

So if I want to make simple soup with pastina can I use stock or will it be too bland?
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Old 10-24-2011, 10:54 AM   #14
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Originally Posted by dcgator View Post
Wow
Thanks for the detailed answer!

So if I want to make simple soup with pastina can I use stock or will it be too bland?

You shouldn't expect any stock or broth to provide any flavor other than the meat flavor it was made from. If you don't want bland soup, you should expect to season it.
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Old 10-24-2011, 10:56 AM   #15
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Originally Posted by dcgator View Post
Wow
Thanks for the detailed answer!

So if I want to make simple soup with pastina can I use stock or will it be too bland?
The difference from a technical standpoint is, in fact, the use of bones. Colloquially, they are used interchangeably.

The use of bones makes stock a richer and more substantial liquid than broth and thus ioften preferred for soups.
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Old 10-24-2011, 12:16 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
The difference from a technical standpoint is, in fact, the use of bones. Colloquially, they are used interchangeably.

The use of bones makes stock a richer and more substantial liquid than broth and thus ioften preferred for soups.
The use of bones allows the water, and some mildly acidic ingredient, such as celery, to leach minerals, nutrients, and collagen from the bone, the bone marrow, and any connecting tissue or cartillage attached to the bone. This makes, as Andy M correctly stated, a richer liquid with a more luxurious mouth feel, added flavor, and higher ntrient content.

This liquid is usually made in large amounts, with the resultant prodiuct devided into usable batches, and either frozen, or canned for later use. Stock is something that you "stock" your pantry with. Again, it is a starting point for many cooking applications. And yes, Like Andy M stated, you need to enhance the stock to come up with good soups, sauces, or whatever.

Example; Italian Wedding soup would start with a good beef stock, with added tomato, veggies, pasta, and maybe some garlic and oregano.

A great stir fry might consist of the stir-fried veggies, and meat, sauced with a combination of chicken stock, a touch of sugar, some soy sauce, a little sesame oil, and cornstarch used to thicken it.

For a great primer on how to use stocks, look up the mother sauces. Some of them, and many of their derivitive sauces, use some type of stock in their ingredient list.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 10-25-2011, 01:44 AM   #17
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GW--I''ve always made Italian Wedding Soup using a chicken stock. I don't think I've ever seen a recipe using beef stock--would you please share your recipe? I love It. Wedding Soup and the German variation, Hochzeitsuppe (both of which generally use chicken stock, but I guess there's no reason one couldn't use one or the other or even veggie stock). Curious to see if this is another variation of this type of soup.

I was told stock was made from bones, roasted, no salt, limited seasonings by from friend who went to chef school--the no salt is because it is intended to be used as a base for something else. I don't usually make big enough batches--I know what I'm going to do with the stock, most of the time. So I guess mine's "meatless" broth--although, the marrow bones often have bits of meat on them...Broth is made with the meat...and can include the bones, seasoning. In NA, I think common usage, unless one has been to culinary school, is to use the terms broth and stock interchangeably (and my friend tends to be a bit of a know-it-all when it comes to culinary terms--has to correct you if you interchange stock and broth...for example). A bit of vinegar will leach the nutrients (I think it is mostly the calcium) from the bones if you don't like/add celery.
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