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Old 05-18-2011, 10:08 AM   #1
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Yeast in a double batch

Hey all,

I've been baking bread for a couple years now, but I've never doubled a batch. I was wondering how much yeast I should use? I've poked around online, and found a mix of answers. I'm planning on using a jar of dry yeast. (not rapid rise). I'm making ciabatta bread and pretzels. If I use more yeast, do I add more to the sponge as well?

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Old 05-18-2011, 10:23 AM   #2
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If you are going to let your dough ferment for a day or two you really do not have to use more yeast for a double batch of ciabatta.
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Old 05-18-2011, 10:23 AM   #3
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I'm also a bread baker - weekly - and my answer is.... it depends. I normally work from a poolish, but I've also worked directly from a new yeast starter mixture, which is what you sound as though you're doing.

The "it depends" part is how long do you have before you want to have the bread baked. You can use the normal amount of yeast starter without doubling it IF after working it into your dough you give it time to double again, usually a couple of hours in a warm, damp place.

If you want to work in less time, then there's no reason not to double your yeast.

As I said, I work from a poolish (preferment) that I prepare the night before (1 cup of flour+1 cup of warm water+1 pkg. of yeast. Mix, cover and use it within the next two days.) and guarantees a nice rise in anything I add it to, and I only use one package of yeast to get it started. But in making a poolish, I caution you to use only a glass or ceramic vessel, and stir it with a wooden spoon only. No metal of any kind. Sometimes metal kills yeast. (It has something to do with radical-free ions - remember high school chemistry? I don't. I just take their word for it.) I don't even use plastic.

I hope I've been of some help.
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Old 05-18-2011, 12:47 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Selkie View Post
I'm also a bread baker - weekly - and my answer is.... it depends. I normally work from a poolish, but I've also worked directly from a new yeast starter mixture, which is what you sound as though you're doing.

The "it depends" part is how long do you have before you want to have the bread baked. You can use the normal amount of yeast starter without doubling it IF after working it into your dough you give it time to double again, usually a couple of hours in a warm, damp place.

If you want to work in less time, then there's no reason not to double your yeast.

As I said, I work from a poolish (preferment) that I prepare the night before (1 cup of flour+1 cup of warm water+1 pkg. of yeast. Mix, cover and use it within the next two days.) and guarantees a nice rise in anything I add it to, and I only use one package of yeast to get it started. But in making a poolish, I caution you to use only a glass or ceramic vessel, and stir it with a wooden spoon only. No metal of any kind. Sometimes metal kills yeast. (It has something to do with radical-free ions - remember high school chemistry? I don't. I just take their word for it.) I don't even use plastic.

I hope I've been of some help.
Do you happen to have a recipe for 100% whole grain flour using the poolish that you would be willing to share?
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Old 05-18-2011, 07:29 PM   #5
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Well thank you very much for your input. Is a poolish the same thing as a sponge?
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Old 05-18-2011, 07:37 PM   #6
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Not really. A Poolish is the French term for an Italian Biga, although wetter, and both are the same thing as an English pre-ferment. Got that!?

Here's a Wikipedia description:

Pre-ferment - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

It's an aged sponge technically, I suppose.
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Old 05-19-2011, 08:13 PM   #7
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I have done a lot of bread making and if I'm going to be using the dough that same day then I definitely double the yeast if I am doubling the recipe. Hope that helps. Good luck with your baking!
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