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Old 01-16-2014, 04:42 PM   #11
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I would think apple cider vinegar would be better than the harsh white vinegar. Or even rice vinegar. I love collard greens and cabbage, cauliflower, etc.
Probably if you didn't add in the sweetness with molasses or brown sugar. I actually had to add extra when I made them the other night because I got a little heavy handed when I added the molasses (don't measure anymore) and they were a bit sweet. You really aren't adding that much anyway compared to everything else so you just get the vinegary taste.
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Old 01-16-2014, 04:47 PM   #12
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I don't think anybody would want to eat them raw, maybe zapped in a blender for a "health" drink but even then I'm not so sure. They are kind of tough and fibrous, especially the homegrown ones. Don't know what is grown commercially but there's a world of difference between what I grow and what I get bagged in the grocery. Greens pack a lot of nutrition plus fiber though and really aren't that much trouble. Once you get them started, it's just an occasional stir. You don't have to add all the other stuff, just makes it taste better. The lunch ladies from school certainly didn't add all the doctoring. Just greens, water, S&P and vinegar, which is why most of the kids, including myself, wouldn't touch them with a 10' pole. Honestly, I've never tried them that way as an adult. I reluctantly agreed to try Emeril's recipe since Craig likes even the "lunch ladies" greens preparation, though he much prefers Emeril's.
I don't think there's anything I eat that don't like the flavor of "as is" as well as seasoned or sauced. Spinach, B sprouts, even cabbage I'd have no problem eating plain if that's all there was.
I was just curious if collard greens can be enjoyed by themself. They sound like how Andy M describes cauliflower
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Old 01-16-2014, 05:09 PM   #13
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You have to be careful with any kind of greens when taking Warfarin, Coumadin, etc., even salad greens. Patients are warned about that when they are started on the medications.

Perhaps you should look up some other recipes before making a blanket statement about length of cooking times and/or cook some yourself. Some people cook even longer. Some people a little shorter. Depends on the texture you like. It also depends on whether you are using brand new leaves or full-size leaves. I use full-size leaves for my traditional type preparation, which is the only kind I've ever seen available commercially.
Actually, I wasn't making "a blanket statement" about the length of cooking times of collard greens generally. I have only seen the two featured recipes and I was commenting on the length of time they were cooked.
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Old 01-16-2014, 05:26 PM   #14
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They sound overcooked to me too. But, then I thought about it. I cook Danish red cabbage for 2 hours. They both have vinegar, so I guess that makes a difference. Keeps away that "overcooked cabbage" smell.
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Old 01-16-2014, 05:54 PM   #15
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Actually, being a novice to Collard's I didn't add any vinegar or sugar at all to last night's greens, and I thought they were great. They seem to have a slight bitter taste and I liked that just fine.
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Old 01-16-2014, 06:48 PM   #16
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I would think apple cider vinegar would be better than the harsh white vinegar. Or even rice vinegar. I love collard greens and cabbage, cauliflower, etc.
It's a matter of personal taste, like so much else (skim vs. whole milk for béchamel, anyone?). I prefer white vinegar to cider or rice vinegar in a lot of cases, although I'm a vinegar fiend
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Old 01-16-2014, 06:52 PM   #17
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I don't know if this is the case in the US, but here in Quebec, almost all the white vinegar is made from alcohol made from petroleum products.

I did find that Loblaws, etc. carry a President's Choice white vinegar made from grain alcohol. I bought some for when someone really wants white vinegar on/with food. The other kind lives under my sink with the other cleaning products.
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Old 01-16-2014, 06:52 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by pacanis View Post

I don't think there's anything I eat that don't like the flavor of "as is" as well as seasoned or sauced. Spinach, B sprouts, even cabbage I'd have no problem eating plain if that's all there was.
I was just curious if collard greens can be enjoyed by themself. They sound like how Andy M describes cauliflower
They have a bitter flavor, like most brassicas, which some people enjoy and some not so much. This is a traditional preparation for collards. I found later in life that I like cooked greens better (I still don't like them much) with some sort of pork product and vinegar in them, but you can certainly try them with less and see what you think.
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Old 01-16-2014, 06:56 PM   #19
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Actually, I wasn't making "a blanket statement" about the length of cooking times of collard greens generally. I have only seen the two featured recipes and I was commenting on the length of time they were cooked.
Actually, what you said was:

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The length of cooking seems a bit extreme. Collard greens are in the brassica (cabbage) family? Right? None of the cabbage family are improved by long cooking.
It seems to me that many cabbage recipes are cooked for a long time, like stuffed cabbage rolls, for instance. Collards are pretty tough.
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Old 01-16-2014, 06:57 PM   #20
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...
It seems to me that many cabbage recipes are cooked for a long time, like stuffed cabbage rolls, for instance. Collards are pretty tough.
And I think that is why I can't stand cabbage rolls. I do like cabbage.
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greens bacon onion beer, recipe

Collard greens can be really yummy Okay, I'll take the advice from yesterday's dinner thread and start a recipe thread for collards. This is not really my recipe but one I've stolen from Emeril and I just kind of adapt to what I have in the pantry. Bag of collards or a big bunch of collards - washed and picked thru (even if it's bagged cause I've found bugs before) A good sized onion, chopped 2 good size garlic cloves, chopped 4-6 pieces of bacon - I've even just used bacon grease if didn't have any bacon and it tasted the same, just didn't have the bacon bits in it Bottle of plain old beer - you can use chicken broth or even water if you don't want to use beer but beer just makes it better. 1 tablespoon of molasses or 2 tablespoons of brown sugar (dark or light, whatever you have) good shake of cayenne pepper - to your heat tolerance white vinegar to taste - I start with a couple of tablespoons salt and pepper Cook the bacon in a medium sized, heavy bottomed pot till crispy, remove and set aside to cool, then break into pieces. Cook onions in pot until translucent over medium heat, add the garlic for a minute or so, then add the whole bottle of beer. Add cayenne, S&P, molasses or brown sugar, and vinegar, stir. Once starting to boil start adding the collards a good handful at a time, pressing down and mixing up as they start to soften. Throw in some of the bacon pieces here and there as you do this. Cover and let cook until your desired doneness. Adding water if all the liquid evaporates and they still need to cook longer. I cook them until they are totally soft as that's the way Craig likes them. Usually takes the better part of an hour. We grow collards too like the other person in the dinner thread. A few plants can grow a lot of collards and where we live it's tough to give them away as most people here associate them with bad cafeteria food from school. So, we had to find other uses. BTW, they do freeze well if you blanch them but generally fall apart once they've been in the freezer. I much prefer the ones we've grown to what we get from the grocery so I don't mind freezing them. Creamed collards - just like creamed spinach but they take a little longer to cook. Collard Rolls - Blanch them, cut out the center vein where it starts to get big and roll up just like you would for cabbage rolls. We like to use dirty rice for this. Funny thing, when I posted this on the dinner forum the first year we grew collards, my idea showed up on a Food Network program a couple of months later. You can't blanch and freeze the whole leaves, they just tear apart - yep, learned from experience. Whose up next? 3 stars 1 reviews
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