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Old 05-28-2014, 01:17 PM   #11
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My sauce always has a healthy dose of dried porchini mushrooms. Add them just once, and you'll never be without them again. Yes, they are expensive but I buy them in bulk through Amazon to make them affordable.
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Old 05-28-2014, 01:36 PM   #12
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My sauce always has a healthy dose of dried porchini mushrooms. Add them just once, and you'll never be without them again. Yes, they are expensive but I buy them in bulk through Amazon to make them affordable.
I always have dry porcini on hand. I got mine from Oregon Mushrooms: Oregon Mushrooms

I grab a handful, chop them roughly and toss them in the sauce.
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Old 05-28-2014, 02:23 PM   #13
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I grab a handful, chop them roughly and toss them in the sauce.
Me too Andy. The premium quality I get are nice and clean, no need to pre soak them and they release all the flavor in cooking the sauce.
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Old 05-28-2014, 03:05 PM   #14
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I swear i can remember my grandmother throwing in a whole chunk of Parmesan cheese into her sauce. If you don't have grated, Don't sweat it.
She probably threw in the parmesan rind rather than waste it when she couldn't grate any more cheese off it. Fairly common in Italian families (and mine even though I'm not Italian) and it gives a lot of flavour to the sauce. It is, of course, discarded when the sauce is ready to be served. I've seen it done on television cooking demos, too.
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Old 05-28-2014, 03:12 PM   #15
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My sauce always has a healthy dose of dried porchini mushrooms. Add them just once, and you'll never be without them again. Yes, they are expensive but I buy them in bulk through Amazon to make them affordable.

I use dried Hen of the Woods mushrooms. Sadly, the tree where my friend used to find them was cut down, no more free mushrooms unless we can find another dying oak with them.
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Old 05-28-2014, 03:57 PM   #16
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[B]

I've heard of people putting vinegar in their sauce. Is this cool?
Vinegar is often used as an alternative to wine either because cooks have no wine available or they are teetotal or because the recipe asks for it.

Wine vinegar would be best, I think, although balsamic or cider vinegar would probably work if you have it in.

In France they often use verjuice (made from the sour juice of unripe grapes) as an alternative to vinegar.
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Old 05-28-2014, 04:23 PM   #17
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I wouldn't add anything acidic to a tomato sauce until the very end if it's too sweet and then I'll add some citric acid I keep around for adding acidity without too much extra flavor. Adding anything sweet or acidic to a tomato sauce before it's done cooking is unwise because tomatoes vary in acidity and sweetness. For me a tomato sauce is bright and slightly acidic on the tongue and has a sweeter, almost mellow finish rounded out by the supporting flavors in the sauce and that's the attribute I feel gets lost when you cook tomatoes for too long. A long cooked sauce is more of a one note flavor to me.
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Old 05-28-2014, 07:41 PM   #18
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My sauce always has a healthy dose of dried porchini mushrooms. Add them just once, and you'll never be without them again. Yes, they are expensive but I buy them in bulk through Amazon to make them affordable.
I use them too. They are such a great umami addition to tomato sauce and so many other things.

The best I've had I brought back from that big market in Florence, Italy. The stuff you buy here does not compare. Then I found a serviceable tub of them at BJ's Warehouse (think Costco) but they stopped selling them because no one bought them. Now I usually buy them at Eataly in NYC.

Dried porcinis are a fabulous and versatile ingredient.
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Old 05-28-2014, 07:46 PM   #19
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Vinegar is often used as an alternative to wine either because cooks have no wine available or they are teetotal or because the recipe asks for it.

Wine vinegar would be best, I think, although balsamic or cider vinegar would probably work if you have it in.

In France they often use verjuice (made from the sour juice of unripe grapes) as an alternative to vinegar.

Wine is usually added to tomato sauce for the alcohol not the acid . Tomatoes are acidic enough on their own.

Alcohol dissolved flavor components better that water or oil does.

Alcohol is especially effective with tomatoes. Hence red wine and vodka being used.
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Old 05-28-2014, 08:02 PM   #20
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I use them too. They are such a great umami addition to tomato sauce and so many other things.

The best I've had I brought back from that big market in Florence, Italy. The stuff you buy here does not compare. Then I found a serviceable tub of them at BJ's Warehouse (think Costco) but they stopped selling them because no one bought them. Now I usually buy them at Eataly in NYC.

Dried porcinis are a fabulous and versatile ingredient.
How right you are jenny. The flavor was unsurpassed but they ended up in the dumpster. I had to go find this this thread of my Italian porcinis disaster..Only now I can laugh...Mushroom disaster!!
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ISO the Best Tomato Sauce [B]Let's talk about tomato sauce.[/B] I have some on the stove right now! Here's what i put in it: Sauteed garlic and mushrooms, followed by six spicy/hot sausages cut into 3rds which were then seared before adding crushed tomatoes. A little salt and pepper, basil and oregano (unfortunately the herbs were not fresh, i only had dried) And a small handful of Parmesan cheese. I had baked some chicken earlier in the day and saved the drippings so, screw it, in the pot it goes. Popped on the lid and lowered to a simmer. Now i plan on letting it sit for quite a while, at least until the sausage is cooked through. I find the longer you cook a sauce the better the end result but is it possible I'll over-cook the meat? Anyway, now that ive explained the recipie that will begin making me millions of dollars let's get to the real reason i created this thread... I want to pick the brains of all you brilliant bolognese chefs out there. All you secret sauce samaritans, all you pasta pro's with something to prove. [B]I need to know[/B], what makes a good tomato sauce a good tomato sauce. What ingredients are your favorites and which are taboo? What techniques are sacred in your sauce-making? What are some crazy sauces you guys and gals have free-styled? Is it fair to dip Mozzarella sticks in marinara while your spaghetti is bone dry?! Ive heard of people putting vinegar in their sauce. Is this cool? Simply put, I wanna know your deepest darkest tomato sauce secrets! Let the compendium begin! 3 stars 1 reviews
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