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Old 11-10-2008, 02:41 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by pacanis View Post
Something I've been noticing, and maybe it's just me, is that if I fry something using EVOO it incorporates into the gravy much more easily than if I use canola oil. Canola oil and I need to remember to dump some.

I can't think of a reason for that to be happening. Could it be the differences in the foods you are cooking and/or how much oil you add to the pan each time?
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Old 11-10-2008, 02:52 PM   #12
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I was thinking that, Andy. EVOO I tend to use with beef, like burgers, or pork, like porch chops. Canola I use with chicken, both skinned and also left skin on. My chicken gravy is always "fattier" looking and tends to separate. Even if I merely seared a skinless breast.
I'm going to have to do a same food/same oil comparison.
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Old 11-10-2008, 02:57 PM   #13
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I hate canola oil, but that has nothing to do with making gravy.

That pan should be just fine for making gravy.

After reading on about making gravy and listening to advice of good folks here I have been making excellent gravies. Who ever might need gravy advice should dig up that thread and you will find all that is necessary to make good gravy.
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Old 11-10-2008, 02:57 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pacanis View Post
I was thinking that, Andy. EVOO I tend to use with beef, like burgers, or pork, like porch chops. Canola I use with chicken, both skinned and also left skin on. My chicken gravy is always "fattier" looking and tends to separate. Even if I merely seared a skinless breast.
I'm going to have to do a same food/same oil comparison.

There are lots of variables, including the weight and the fat and moisture in the meat you're cooking and the absence (I assume) of a precise measuring of the oil you put into the pan.

Why do you use two different oils in the first place?

When it's all said and done, it's probably not worth a lot of thought.
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Old 11-10-2008, 03:12 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
There are lots of variables, including the weight and the fat and moisture in the meat you're cooking and the absence (I assume) of a precise measuring of the oil you put into the pan.

Why do you use two different oils in the first place?

When it's all said and done, it's probably not worth a lot of thought.
Beats me I only used one before joining this forum. Now I've got three
Someone gave me a cornbread recipe, I won't say who as I've been sworn to secrecy , that specifically called for canola oil. So I got some. Also, reading smoke points and such, and using oils to add flavor, I put everyone's opinions together and decided that since I fry chicken at hotter temps than I cook porchops or brown burgers and more heavily season it, that I would use the canola for that, too. Otherwise I would only use it once a month or so, when I make cornbread.

It's just one of those things I do
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Old 11-10-2008, 04:12 PM   #16
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I use canola for just about all of my pan frying/searing. I use olive oil more as an ingredient in such things as a tomato sauce, etc.
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Old 11-10-2008, 04:25 PM   #17
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canola oil all the way, once in a while i will us olive oil but just for the taste. tried baking a cake once using olive oil. cake tasted funny, un flavered oil.
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Old 11-10-2008, 05:09 PM   #18
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It seems all the tv chefs were using EVOO no matter what they were cooking, sauteing or frying in a pan, so I just kinda picked up the habit, with a few exceptions. I'll definitely give my theory a try and see if it's the food and not the oil, because my gravy definitely comes out better if I've fried the food in EVOO.
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Old 11-11-2008, 08:54 AM   #19
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On the subject of oils:

EVOO, or any olive oil, does have some different properties from other veggie oils. I haven't experienced the "incorporating" into gravies better, but then, I don't use olive oil to make gravy, mainly because of the taste.

On the subject of gravy:

I like to use cast iron skillets as my roasting pans. The only problem is, the 12" skillets that we have are not big enough for turkeys. So, I roast in a really thin enamelled roasting pan (what my in-laws have given us). I will pour the drippings into a CI skillet. I'll even add a little stock to the roasting pan in an attempt to deglaze it, but I hate putting that kind of pan on a burner. Once I get as much of the drippings as I can into the skillet, I'll turn the heat on and caramelize the drippings. This involves cooking all the water off, and caramelizing the solids (blood, bits of skin, etc.). Once this reaches a nut-brown color, I deglaze the pan with stock. Bring this to a boil, stirring and scraping the pan bottom well to insure everything comes up. Then I strain this liquid into a gravy separater. I pour off the highly-flavored liquid, and discard the fat. Then liquid is brought back to a boil, and thickened with either roux or cornstarch. Season to taste.

Yes, this is highly complicated, and involves dirtying several pieces of equipment. I prefer a simpler method, just roasting in the skillet, deglazing that, and tightening to make gravy. I've found that removing all the little bits that don't dissolve make the gravy look better, and gravy tastes better if the fat is removed, IMHO.
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