"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Pasta, Rice, Beans, Grains...
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 11-14-2004, 08:51 PM   #21
Head Chef
 
Audeo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: USA,Texas
Posts: 1,871
I'd like to offer a special thanks to all of you for your thoughts and ideas!

I have learned that pasta, as with all things, requires practice, practice to be able to "intuit" the feel of the dough going in and coming out of the roller. And thanks to so many here, especially Darkstream, I have improved immensely...after about 35-40 tries since originally posting this thread. The agreements I have with all of you are too numerous to mention on a variety of points!

The biggest solution for me in making ravioli was employing a flouring/folding then re-rolling technique to create a much thinner pasta layer, moreover cooking the ravioli in barely simmerine broth, instead of a boiling solution. My family is truly much happier these days...!

Next on my OCD horizons is to continue practicing the flouring/folding/rolling thinner and thinner technique to produce a super-thin layer tantamount to phyllo pastry to make strudel!

(Best wishes and prayers are welcomed here....!)
__________________

__________________
Pain is inevitable. Suffering is Optional.
Audeo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-22-2004, 03:02 PM   #22
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Galena, IL
Posts: 7,973
Husband uses 1 egg to 3/4 cup AP flour, pinch of salt, with a very high success rate. For what it is worth, he uses egg beaters (I believe it is 1/4 cup=1 egg) more often than whole eggs (simply because it is easier to have them on hand). Yes, we did experiment with all kinds of supposedly more 'authentic' flours, but remember that the "authentic" flour is used with the "authentic" eggs and "authentic" other ingredients. Humidity, water, size of eggs, size of yolk, etc, differ from place to place, and plain old AP flour seems to work better than specialty flours.

He used to make all our pasta from scratch, but then we bought a pasta maker from hell (which I finally threw out). I'm now looking for a new one so we can get back to "normal". (In the past we've owned Atlas and Mercato, but this was an Imperia and it was so poorly milled that it shredded the dough instead of cutting it). If you have great friends with great kids, making pasta is a fun thing to do with them.
__________________

__________________
Claire is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-05-2004, 07:43 PM   #23
Sous Chef
 
subfuscpersona's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 562
Quote:
Originally Posted by on 06-Oct-2004 Darkstream
A NOTE ON FLOUR
This is a notorious problem in any international cooking forum...Basically, pasta is made from durham wheat, a hard (high in gluten) wheat that is also used in bread making...The recipes above use Canadian wholewheat and white durham flour. Since most of you appear to live in the USA, and Canada is just a stones throw away (comparatively), you SHOULD be able to get proper flour.

But if not, then you should use a strong bread flour. If it is not strong enough, you can add one or two tablespoons of cornflour to the wheat to increase the gluten content.
Hi Darkstream - I was re-reading this thread (most excellent advice!) but I'm confused why cornflour increases the gluten content. Please enlighten. TIA
__________________
subfuscpersona is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2004, 07:42 AM   #24
Master Chef
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 9,229
If I felt I needed to increase the protien content, I would use vital wheat gluten. It's available in local supermarkets around here.

Seeeeya; Goodweed of the North
__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- http://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2004, 12:48 PM   #25
Sous Chef
 
subfuscpersona's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 562
re - using cornflour to increase gluten content

Quote:
Originally Posted by on 05-Dec-2004 subfuscpersona
Quote:
Originally Posted by on 06-Oct-2004 Darkstream
A NOTE ON FLOUR
This is a notorious problem in any international cooking forum...Basically, pasta is made from durham wheat, a hard (high in gluten) wheat that is also used in bread making...you SHOULD be able to get proper flour...But if not, then you should use a strong bread flour. If it is not strong enough, you can add one or two tablespoons of cornflour to the wheat to increase the gluten content.
Hi Darkstream - I was re-reading this thread (most excellent advice!) but I'm confused why cornflour increases the gluten content. Please enlighten. TIA
Quote:
Originally Posted by on 06-Dec-2004 Goodweed of the North
If I felt I needed to increase the protien content, I would use vital wheat gluten.
So would I. To my knowledge cornflour contains no gluten. That's why I'm confused by Darkstream's recommendation.
__________________
subfuscpersona is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2004, 04:11 PM   #26
Master Chef
 
Michael in FtW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 6,592
I spent 6-months going crazy trying to figure this out .... but I now own an Italian/English - English/Italian dictionary .... and if you really want them I can point you to several on-line resources on "international" flour composition and grading.

Ah, yes .. flour .... there is NO way to get a direct comparison between American flours and European flours ... especially from France, Germany, or Italy since the US doesn't use the same grading methods. Since we're talking about pasta - I'll skip the French and German stuff ...

Dried pasta in Italy is, by law, only durham wheat flour and water. If the flour originates from durham wheat grown in Italy it is called Semolina. If it comes from flour ground from durham wheat grown in, and imported from, Canada it is called Mannitoba. In the US - durham wheat ground into flour, regardless of where it was grown, is either called Semolina or Durham Wheat flour.

American's can go nuts trying to find Italian "Type 00" flour to make "authentic" Italian homemade pasta (which is an egg pasta). Although I can not find any Italian source that states it specifically - Type 00 must relate to how finely the flour is milled since there are no less than 7 types of Type 00 flour, with different ash/protent/gluten contents all for different purposes. Italian flours seem to fall into two catagories - Type (a finer milled flour) and a Calibration (coarser milled). In Italy, you would just pick up a bag of "Type 00 for pasta" and be done with it.

In America, if we want to make "homemade pasta" comperable to Italian homemade noodles, it seems the Italian immigrants are right - just us plain old American AP flour.

What does an Italian in America do to make a more substantial pasta dough - like for lasagna noodles, manicotti, etc. ? They don't go rushing around looking for something special like corn flour, gluten flour, etc. - they just add an extra egg yolk to the recipe! Well, that is if you can trust the Italian cooks on TV such as Carlo Middione, Lidia Bastianich, Nick Stellino, or Biba Caggiano - and I swear I saw Mario Batali do it a couple of times but he didn't explain why.
__________________
"It ain't what you don't know that gets you in trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so." - Mark Twain
Michael in FtW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-10-2004, 01:12 PM   #27
Senior Cook
 
Darkstream's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 287
Well, I think you are in fact probably right. Cornflour (I am not talking corn meal/polenta, but the white fine powder used in Chinese sauces) is as I understand it made from maize. And maize products do not contain gluten, which is why the are recommended to those who have gluten allergy.

I remember reading somewhere that adding cornflour would help if the flour you were using to make pasta was too soft. I have tried it, and it has worked for me. It seems to add extra starch or something that elasticises the dough.

But at the end of the day, why don't you simply use Canadian durum wheat bread and pasta flour? Canada is NOT that far away from America. If you can get it in Italy (a LOT of "Italian" pasta is made from Canadian wheat), you MUST be able to get it in America.

Or is it a prohibited substance in the US?
__________________
Darkstream is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-10-2004, 06:58 PM   #28
Master Chef
 
Michael in FtW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 6,592
Darkstream - the fine white corn powder used in Chinese sauces is usually corn starch, not corn flour.

Believe it or not, we grow durum wheat here in the US, too. The problem is that not every store carries it - I've got 5 stores around me that I shop at for different things and only 2 carry semolina flour. The stuff available to me is from Bob's Red Mill in Oregon - Bob's No. 1 Semolina for Pasta.
__________________
"It ain't what you don't know that gets you in trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so." - Mark Twain
Michael in FtW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-11-2004, 10:38 AM   #29
Senior Cook
 
Darkstream's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 287
Two great nations divided by a common language.

Go with the corn starch, and insist that your retailers supply you with the products YOU want, not what they want to supply.
__________________
Darkstream is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-11-2004, 12:27 PM   #30
Head Chef
 
Audeo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: USA,Texas
Posts: 1,871
Ahhhh, the great advice continues on this thread!

My continuing thanks and best wishes to all!
__________________

__________________
Pain is inevitable. Suffering is Optional.
Audeo is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
ceviche BCG Fish & Seafood 4 01-27-2005 11:21 AM
Fresh Lasagna Noodles amber Pasta, Rice, Beans, Grains... 14 01-22-2005 11:47 AM
Sweet Pasta with White Chocolate Cream kansasgirl Desserts, Sweets & Cookies & Candy 0 12-08-2004 04:51 PM
Pasta with Anchovie Sauce debthecook Pasta, Rice, Beans, Grains... 0 11-26-2004 05:57 AM
Hand Forming Stuffed Pasta Darkstream Pasta, Rice, Beans, Grains... 3 11-09-2004 02:37 PM


» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:32 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.