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Old 02-24-2008, 05:52 PM   #1
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Cassava dessert

I grabbed a cassava (also known as yucca, yuca or even tapioca) yesterday, just because it is so cheap, only cost me $ 0.99/lb.
My friends suggest me bake cassava cake, but... it takes 1 hour to bake, kinda energy-consuming. So I changed my mind, and wanna make something unique and relatively green.
Okay, I announce that I create a cassava dessert as shown in my photo, LOL.
It tastes soooooooooooooo goooooooooood, with marvellous smell of coconut, not too sweet, very healthy dessert. Look at the inside, soft red bean paste filling ^&^.

First of all, I would like to talk about the toxin in cassava, which is called cyanide-based toxin. Because of that terrible compound, raw cassava can't be eaten. As a very important first step, boil cassava to get rid of this toxin. If it can be poked through easily, it means the cooking is done. Strain and remove water, wash with running water thoroughly, and strain dry. Now it is ready to be used in further cooking.
For my cassava dessert, besides mashed cassava, I need one small sweet potato (cooked and mashed), 2 tbsp coconut cream powder, 1/2 cup granulated sugar, 4 tbsp sticky rice flour and 1 cup red bean paste. You can find them in oriental store.
Blend cassava, sweet potato, sugar, coconut cream powder, sticky rice flour. Wearing disposable gloves to avoid ingredients sticking on the hand and making mess, form an elastic dough. On the working counter, line a sheet of plastic wrap or parchment paper, place dough on, and divide the dough into eight portions.
On a plate, sprinkle dry shredded coconut.
Wrap each dough portion with red bean paste filling, round well and roll on coconut to have it evenly covered with coconut. Put in muffin cup and place in steamer.
Steam for 15 minutes.
And...
Enjoy!

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Old 02-24-2008, 10:36 PM   #2
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sorry sounds like way to much work. kinda scary too.

babe
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Old 02-24-2008, 11:05 PM   #3
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Was the cassava cake you refer to a Filipino dessert by chance? My Filipina grandmother makes bibingka all the time which is kind of like a custard/bar cake (or our version is at least) made of cassava, coconut milk, eggs and sugar.

You shouldn't be afraid of cooking cassava. The level of cyanide is so low in cultivated varieties; you really don't need to go to any extremes to remove it. We use raw shredded cassava to make bibingka and it cooks with the cake. Very delicious and very filling.
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Old 02-25-2008, 10:51 AM   #4
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I've made Filipino cassava cake about 5-6 times in the last 2 years. I just grate the raw cassava without having to wring it dry, then bake with eggs, coconut cream, and milk. I'm still alive... :-)
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Old 02-25-2008, 11:26 AM   #5
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Anau and Chopstix,
Since it was my first time to cook cassava, I was too cautious on the so-called toxin stuff. When my hubby and I woke up this morning, we laughed and said "see, we are both alive". Quite funny.

Yeah, "Filipino dessert", that's what I talked about. I am quite satisfied with the taste of cassava, and sure I would like to try more traditional and "formal" way to cook this root.

Thanks.
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Old 02-25-2008, 11:44 AM   #6
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Thanks for posting the Cassava cake recipe. It looks interesting and I think I have to try my hand at it.

Some more ways to make Cassava that I learned from some of my family who have lived in Africa are:

Fried Cassava - You just boil the yucca slightly and then remove the peel and then slice it and ensure they are dry. Then deep fry them in oil and sprinkle lime juice, salt and chili powder on it and enjoy.

Mashed Cassava - Boil yucca just like you would potatoes until they are fork tender. Then dry them out and peel them. Cut it into small cubes and then put it in a bowl along with coconut milk and mash them (I like a non-smooth rough mash). You can serve it as a side with curry. It's really very good.
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Old 02-25-2008, 12:44 PM   #7
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Yakuta,
In Brazil, fried cassava is prepare the same way you do except for the lime juice.
Cassava is normally served with mayo or aiolli.

I also use mashed cassava to prepare Bobo de Camarao (Shrimp bobo), a tradicional Brazilian dish. Have you ever heard of?
Here is the recipe (serves 6):

Ingredients
1 Lb cassava root
3 Tbsp olive oil
2 Onions, medium size.
4 fresh tomatoes
2 Lb medium size shrimp, cleaned and peeled. Tails removed.
1 bunch of cilantro, stems finely chopped. Keep the leaves for garnish.
1 cup of coconut milk (thin)
3 Tbsp of dende oil (Red Palm Oil)
Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste

Preparation
Peel and cut the cassava root in cubes.
Put cubes in 4 Qtr saucepan, cover with water and bring to a boil.
Reduce hear and let it simmer until cassava is tender.
Drain water, add 1/4 cup of coconut milk and mash with hand blender, set aside for later.

In the meantime, peel and chop the onions and tomatoes (small size)
In a 5 Qtr. Dutch Oven (or big enough saucepan), heat up the oil medium high and add the chopped onions, cook them for about 5 min. until golden.
Add the tomatoes and cook the mix for additional 5 min.
Add the shrimp and chopped cilantro, salt and pepper to taste and reduce the heat to medium/medium low. Cook for about 7 to 10 min. depending on the type of shrimp you are using (precooked or raw)
Once the shrimp is done (check if it looks pink), add the coconut milk stirring slowly.
Add then the cassava puree, not at once but with a spoon mixing thoroughly to incorporate completely into the shrimp mix.
Stir in the dende oil to the mix and increase the heat to medium and keep cooking for additional 8-10 minutes.

Serve hot from the Dutcho oven/cooking pan over a bed of plain fried rice.
Add cilantro leaves on top of each dish and sprinkle ground pepper.

Notes to improve the flavor of the dish:
a) Marinate the shrimp for 4 hrs before cooking with a mix of lima juice, salt, pepper and chopped garlic. Make sure to bring out of the fridge at least 30 min. before cooking.
b) To reduce the consistency of the Bobo (shrimp mix) due to the cassava and add shrimp flavor, you can use the shrimp leftovers (tails, heads , etc.) to make a stock the day before by boiling them with mirepoix, filtering and refrigerating. Add the stock to the mix before the dende oil to adjust the consistency.
c) Serve with Malagueta Pepper Sauce (Brazilian pepper) on the side if you like hot dishes.
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Old 02-25-2008, 01:01 PM   #8
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Hi wysiwyg thanks for posting the recipe. I have eaten Moghu, Cassava or Yucca as it is known but mostly with an African influence since some of my family is from east africa and these dishes are very popular there.

The version Brazil sound very good as well. I will give it a shot as well. I do like to buy Yucca when I find them at the farmer market. They are high in starch but they really taste good especially the fried versions.
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Old 02-25-2008, 06:46 PM   #9
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Yakuta,
This dish is clearly a mix of African and American Indian influences. African for the fried portion but American Indian because pureed Cassava, or Mandioca as is called in Brazil is mainly the way aborigens prepared it (boiling/stewing as opposed to frying).

In Brazil the Yucca flour is also very popular for all sort of uses. If you are interested, I can send you the recipe to fry it so can be used with bbq'd meat. If you ever go to downtown Chicago, try the "Fogo de Chao" Brazilian restaurant, I am sure they have fried cassava flour (is called Farofa)
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Old 02-25-2008, 07:00 PM   #10
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Hi yes go ahead and send me the recipe as a PT if you dont mind. I have been to Fogo but no I have not tried the dish you mentioned. I did not know Yucca flour existed if you know a place in Chicago I can buy it let me know.

Thanks
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