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Old 04-21-2010, 03:40 PM   #51
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I could write the fallowing recipe my self, but I really would nor be able to explain as well as Sara Molton does. I pretty much fallow the same recipe.

Chicken Kiev

Recipe courtesy Sara Moulton

4 whole chicken breasts with first joint of the wings attached, halved, boned, and skinned
Herb butter, recipe follows
Flour, for dredging
2 large eggs, beaten with 2 teaspoons water
1 cup homemade bread crumbs
1/4 cup vegetable oil

“French” the chicken wing bones by scraping the meat off the bones with a sharp knife and reserving the meat for another use, detach the fillet strip from each breast, and flatten the breasts and the fillets between sheets of dampened wax paper until they are about 1/4-inch thick.
Arrange the chicken breasts skinned side down on a work surface, in the center of each mound 2 tablespoons of the herb butter, and cover the mixture with a fillet strip. Fold up the sides of the breasts to enclose the herb butter, forming the chicken into a “chop”. Dredge the chops carefully in the flour, shaking off the excess, dip them in the egg mixture, and dredge them in the bread crumbs, patting the mixture onto the flesh. Arrange the chops on a rack set over a pan and chill the, uncovered, for at least 1 hour or overnight to let the crumbs dry. In a large heavy skillet, heat the oil over moderate heat until it is hot but not smoking. Brown the chops, transferring them as they are browned to a baking pan. Bake them in a preheated 350 degree oven for 20 minutes. The chicken may be kept warm, covered loosely, for up to 10 minutes.

Herb Butter:

1 stick unsalted butter, softened
1 tablespoons minced fresh chives
1 tablespoons minced fresh parsley leaves
2 teaspoons minced fresh tarragon leaves
1 teaspoon Dijon-style mustard
Salt and pepper, to taste

In a small bowl cream together the butter, the chives, the parsley, the tarragon, the mustard, and salt and pepper to taste. Let the butter stand, covered, in a cool place for 1 hour to allow the flavors to develop.

Yield: 4 servings
Prep Time: 30 minutes
Cook Time: 2 hours 50 minutes
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Old 04-21-2010, 03:44 PM   #52
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Kievskyi Tort:

Split egg whites from egg yolks as carefully as you can. Let the egg whites stay at room temperature for about 24 hours and then whip them 20-25 minutes to increase their volume 4-5 times. When you receive snow-like fluffy foam out of egg whites, add carefully chopped fried nuts mixed with sugar and flour. Mix all together to get a plain substance. And immediately put the substance on the cooking sheets dividing it in two 6-7 mm pieces. Bake them in the oven at 100-120 degrees Celsius for two or two and a half hour. Let them cool. Put butter cream in between the two of them, cover the top with chocolate cream (2-3 mm), decorate with some pink or white cream, or jam.
For the cake pieces you need: egg whites of 10 eggs, 1 glass of sugar, 1 glass of chopped nuts, 3 table spoons of flour, vanilla.
For butter cream: 2/3 glass of sugar, 150 gram butter, 1 egg yolk, 1/2 glass milk, 1 table spoon brandy, vanilla.
For chocolate cream: 1/3 glass of sugar, 70 grams butter, 1/3 glass milk, 2 table spoons cacao powder, 2 tablespoons brandy.
The cake will weigh 1 kilogram.
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Old 04-21-2010, 04:00 PM   #53
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Schav
(spinach soup)
one of the easiest things to make.

Do you want hot or cold? In reality it doesn’t matter.

You can use chicken or beef. I like everything chicken, simply because I like chicken better than beef. In any case start by making a regular clear broth chicken or beef doesn’t matter. Do it the way you would make any soup.

Prepare, clean, peal, chop, dice, anyway you like (I like everything diced finely) onion, potato, carrots and frozen spinach (in reality you need sorrel (“a sharp-tasting plant of the dock family, used for salad greens and in medicines”) for this soup, but it is simply not available in Minnesota, to compensate for the real taste you need to add a little bit of sour taste).

For example: it takes 1 hour from the time chicken boils to the time it is ready.
After meat boiled (or actually a second or two before that) immediately turn the heat down and continue to simmer (soup should never boil). 20 minutes before meat is done add all your veggies. 5 minutes before soup is done taste and season, or actually re-season, because when chickened boiled and you picked of all that yucky dirty foam on the top and you already put the salt and pepper in (right?). I use sour salt, but a little bit of lemon juice will work as well, like a table spoon or so (that is for a 3 quart pot of soup or more). The first time you make it, don’t even bother adding anything, try it, you may just like it as is. Done.

If you want to make cold schav you do not use meat, basically you will make a vegetarian soup. Just boil your veggies; a bullion cube wouldn’t hurt, of course.
When soup is done take out couple of ladles of liquid only, let it cool down, in the mean time open an egg and beat like for a scramble egg. Very slowly whisk the egg into the liquid. Make sure it is not too hot or egg will cook, you do not want that. Egg is use to make soup look some what white. In Russian it was called “zabelit’” to make it white. I think it’s called tempering in English, might wrong. When done add the mixture back to soup, stir it well. Serve it cold with some sour cream.
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Old 04-21-2010, 04:05 PM   #54
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Sour cream cake
(a.k.a. Smetannik)

Dough:

1 cup sugar
1 cup sour cream
2.5 cups (about) flour.
½ t baking soda mixed with vinegar until reaction stops.
Cocoa powder approximate, no real measure depends on brand/type.

Icing/Frosting:

2.5 cups sugar
2 lb sour cream (use the brand that makes the heaviest, thickest sour cream, so it doesn’t run when assembling the cake)
1t vanilla.


Directions:

Make frosting first by mixing above ingredients together until sugar is completely dissolved.

For the dough. Mix sugar and sour cream until sugar is dissolved add flower. Add baking soda/vinegar mix (could substitute with baking powder, but I don’t know how much). The dough should be soft, but hard enough so you can roll it out. Divide into half. Now, my mother adds cocoa powder after she mixed the dough, she kind of works the powder into it. I can never do as good of a job, so I divide everything before hand and add cocoa powder before mixing. That is where the type of cocoa will make a difference. Russian brands are ground very finely, and give rich chocolaty color. And that is what you want. Unfortunately I have not been able to find a good substitute. Mixed dough should be divided into 6 even pieces. 3 with cocoa and 3 without. When assembling the cake you will have to stock them. It’s kind of for looks when cake is cut. In all the truth the cocoa step could be skipped. But then it’s not the same cake.
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Old 04-21-2010, 04:11 PM   #55
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Charlie, does the 6 - 7 mm refer to the thickness of the cake pieces? After 2 - 2 1/2 hours at 230F, I guess the cake pieces must be pretty crunchy. Is it ok to lightly toast the nuts instead of frying them? What kind of nuts do you recommend?

How big around (diameter) should the 2.2 pound cake be?
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Old 04-21-2010, 04:28 PM   #56
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Did I say2 1/2 hours, oh, you are asking about the Kievsky tort and I am looking at the last one.
Yes the thickness is about a 1/4 of an inch. The temp is about 212 - 230. It is baked lik a meringue (sp?) Yes they will be crunchy but the cream will penetrate and make them soft. Yes, the toasting is the word I was looking for but could not remeber, thank you. Cashews are used in the original recipe.
Diameter should be around 10-12 inches.
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Old 04-21-2010, 05:08 PM   #57
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Ok the sour cake recipe just did not make sence. Here is edited version:

Sour cream cake
(a.k.a. Smetannik)

Dough:

1 cup sugar
1 cup sour cream
2.5 cups (about) flour.
½ t baking soda mixed with vinegar until reaction stops.
Cocoa powder approximate, no real measure depends on brand/type.

Icing/Frosting:

2.5 cups sugar
2 lb sour cream (use the brand that makes the heaviest, thickest sour cream, so it doesn’t run when assembling the cake)
1t vanilla.


Directions:

Make frosting first by mixing above ingredients together until sugar is completely dissolved.

For the dough. Mix sugar and sour cream until sugar is dissolved add flower. Add baking soda/vinegar mix (could substitute with baking powder, but I don’t know how much). The dough should be soft, but hard enough so you can roll it out. Divide into half. Now, my mother adds cocoa powder after she mixed the dough, she kind of works the powder into it. I can never do as good of a job, so I divide everything before hand and add cocoa powder before mixing. That is where the type of cocoa will make a difference. Russian brands are ground very finely, and give rich chocolaty color. And that is what you want. Unfortunately I have not been able to find a good substitute. Mixed dough should be divided into 6 even pieces. 3 with cocoa and 3 without. When assembling the cake you will have to stock them. It’s kind of for looks when cake is cut. In all the truth the cocoa step could be skipped. But then it’s not the same cake.

P.S. ok, I really have to fix this. After dough is divided into 6 pieces you should roll them out to fit a 10 or 12 inch frying an. That is what you should use for baking. Spray the bottom of the pan with some oil, Pam, whatever you have, you could sprinkle some breadcrumbs so it will come out easier when done, prevent sticking. Bake at about 350 deg for about 10-15 minutes. Depending on the size of the pan you use and your oven. The baked layer should be cooked thru but soft. It is good idea to pock the holes before baking it. I use fork and just pock the holes all over. The pizza roller could be used.
Start by baking the dark piece. Don’t ask that is what everybody has been doing. While it is baking prepare a serving dish, preferably round, spread some of the frosting on the bottom. When the first piece of crust, can I call that crust is ready, placed on the serving dish, spread some more frosting. Bake the crusts alternatively (sp?), white and chocolate ones. Layer one on the top of the other spreading the frosting. When the last one is done and placed on the top of the cake, using a fork, poke a whole bunch of holes thru the cake, so the frosting can sip in. Spread the rest of the frosting on the top and the sides. You can decorate anyway you like. I am not a very good decorator so I just grate some chocolate and sprinkle heavily on the top. The cake should seat on the counter for at least 24 hours so the frosting penetrates really well. Then put in the refrigerator for another 2 days, don’t worry it is not going to go bed, it will only get better. After that you can serve it. Cut into little pieces, I guarantee you people will not be able to eat too much of it. It is very heavy, but it is heavenly.
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Old 04-22-2010, 02:21 AM   #58
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Nice recipe! :D That sounds exciting.. :) Thanks!
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Old 04-22-2010, 01:10 PM   #59
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Kartoflianiki
Potato piroshky is a closest translation I can come up with.
You can make this from leftovers or premade all needed ingredients. Personally I make this whenever I have some sort of cooked meat leftover. You will need a meat grinder for this, though food processor could also be used, maybe.
Put the meat thru meat grinder, if meat is dry I usually sauté some onion just until soft and add to the mixture, make sure that mixture is well seasoned.
Then I boil whole potato with skin on. That will keep the starch in. When potato cooked, let it cool down somewhat, so you can work with it. Peel the skin and put the potato thru the meat grinder. For 3-4 medium potatoes you will need couple eggs and 1-2 table spoons flour. Season with some salt and pepper and mix well. The mixture should be somewhat sticky and somewhat dry at the same time. Almost like dough, sort of.
When this is ready preheat some oil in the frying pan, not too much. Now it’s time to form the “piroshky”, when done they should look like a knish, or a doughnut, but kind of oblong.
Wet your hands, that will help with potato Not sticking to your hands, take some potato mixture flatten it in your hand, somewhat round, add a spoon fool of meat mixture in the middle. Now it is time to close it. Pinch all the ends together, flatten it somewhat and onto the frying pan it goes. You can make them as big as you want or as small as you want. Fry on both side till golden brown. Remember everything is cooked so it only needs to be heated up.
Note: you could use leftover mashed potato, not a problem, may have to just add a little bit more flour to make it stick together.
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Old 04-22-2010, 01:29 PM   #60
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Pork shoulder.

Take a nice chink of pork shoulder. No bones, not too much fat.
Prepare seasoning. Mix (approximately) equal parts of salt, coarsely ground black pepper and paprika. Crash some bay leaves and lots of garlic, add to the mixture too. Liberally spread all over the meat even poke some deep holes and stuff the mixture inside. Wrap the hole thin in foil. It doesn’t have to be wrapped tight, but make sure that it is closed tight so during the cooking the juices will not run out. If meat is very lean you can smother some mayo over the meat, if there is enough fat, don’t bother with mayo.
Cook like you would cook pork roast, until done. Take it out of the oven cool it down and the n put in the fridge until cold. When cold slice thinly like a cold cut, if you want to be really unhealthy spread some of the fat that is congealed by now on a piece of bread add the meat and some good mustard, enjoy your sandwich with whatever else you might like to add to it.
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