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Old 11-05-2010, 02:09 AM   #21
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Good morning ladies, I hate a soggy bottom so when you say "pie shells" does this mean a blind baked bottom?
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Old 11-05-2010, 02:23 AM   #22
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Originally Posted by Bolas De Fraile View Post
Good morning ladies, I hate a soggy bottom so when you say "pie shells" does this mean a blind baked bottom?
No, I bake my pie crusts at the same time as the tourtiere. But, the the meat mixture isn't wet when I put it in the pie crust and doesn't get wet while baking. Never had a problem with soggy.

Tourtiere is traditionally served with gravy or home made ketchup. Some people like baked beans on the side.
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Old 01-02-2011, 12:31 AM   #23
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Bolas, I've guided two sisters through doing this, two years ago over the phone, this year on the internet with the youngest. No, I've never blind-baked, and the bottom has been always crispy and flaky (as I said, I gave up on making the pastry part years ago and buy it in the dairy fridge). Neither of my sisters have had a problem with soggy bottoms either. I didn't ask what kind of pie pan they used, but I use a clear Pyrex one, so I can look at the bottom and see when it is golden, so I don't take it out too early. Remember, the filling is already cooked when you put it in the pie pan. To me the "secret", whatever you use for thickener, it to make sure the meat filling is almost as thick as you want it before baking, so you don't wind up with a lot of unthickened meat juices running into the bottom.

Believe it or not, some of the elders in my family (long since passed away) used to just put raw ground pork between the pie crusts and bake.
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Old 01-02-2011, 09:46 PM   #24
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Well, I'm sitting here in the after-glow of a good holiday season, just after sending my inexperienced guests home with full bellies of tourtiere.My sisters picked up the torch, to re-visit an old tradition, and to introduce the younger generations to it. For me the one ingredient all of you have told me about is savory, and every year I swear I'm going to grow some or buy some, but find myself cooking and ... well, you know how it goes. My husband just went back to have a big slice before going to bed. In my family, this dish was always accompanied by beets of some sort. Does anyone know the tradition behind that, or, for that matter, even heard of it? Since I was fitting a Canuk dish around a diverse ethnic group, I made a large plate of pickled vegetables for the main side. That went over like gang-busters as well, they just loved it. As you all know, tourtiere isn't exactly a "lite" dish. But if anyone else has heard of beets as a side to tourtiere, let me know. I'm just assuming that it is when you're freezing your tootie off, and don't have stuff like lettuce and tomatoes going around, root veggies work!
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Old 01-03-2011, 12:16 AM   #25
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Well, I'm sitting here in the after-glow of a good holiday season, just after sending my inexperienced guests home with full bellies of tourtiere.My sisters picked up the torch, to re-visit an old tradition, and to introduce the younger generations to it. For me the one ingredient all of you have told me about is savory, and every year I swear I'm going to grow some or buy some, but find myself cooking and ... well, you know how it goes. My husband just went back to have a big slice before going to bed. In my family, this dish was always accompanied by beets of some sort. Does anyone know the tradition behind that, or, for that matter, even heard of it? Since I was fitting a Canuk dish around a diverse ethnic group, I made a large plate of pickled vegetables for the main side. That went over like gang-busters as well, they just loved it. As you all know, tourtiere isn't exactly a "lite" dish. But if anyone else has heard of beets as a side to tourtiere, let me know. I'm just assuming that it is when you're freezing your tootie off, and don't have stuff like lettuce and tomatoes going around, root veggies work!
Not sure about the beets, but I think they are traditional. They certainly go well with it. You are probably right that it's cause fresh leafy veg is hard to come by in winter. Home made ketchup is also traditional with tourtière. I'll ask on LiveJournal Montreal.
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Old 01-03-2011, 12:42 AM   #26
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I like to test my leetle gray cells, so my Quebecoise cookbook is ... well, ... yes.... in French. There must be a dozen recipes for tourtiere, but almost all of the say "Cuire au four, a 350 (175c) jusqu'a ce que la pate soit bien doree. So I put in on and start looking after a half hour. The clear pyrex dishes let me look to the bottom until the pate soit bien doree. Until the crust is golden. Try explaining that to my sisters!
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Old 02-18-2011, 09:07 AM   #27
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Thumbs up Pastie recipe

I will submit my recipe in a day or so. If anyone wants to try it. I use beef and pork roast together, chopped but not ground. And, I use thyme leaves and basil with onion powder, garlic powder, white pepper. I use the seasoning in the meat/veggie mix and in the dough. As the traditional recipes use. An egg white wash on top for golden brown product. And I use turnips finely diced mixed with potatoes, celery and onions. If you don't use the turnips its not really a true traditional pastie. They blend nicely with the potatoes.
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Old 02-18-2011, 09:29 AM   #28
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Thank you I'll be watching for it.
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Old 02-18-2011, 10:19 AM   #29
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I forgot about mentioning adding some diced rutagagas in with turnips. Not too many- just gives the mixture a bit of a bite.
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Old 02-18-2011, 10:25 AM   #30
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Not sure about the beets, but I think they are traditional. They certainly go well with it. You are probably right that it's cause fresh leafy veg is hard to come by in winter. Home made ketchup is also traditional with tourtière. I'll ask on LiveJournal Montreal.
Please do get a recipe for the homemade ketchup! An ex-boyfriend's mom used to make tourtiere with the best homemade ketchup. She grew up in the Gaspe area.
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french canadian, meat pie, recipe, tourtiere

Tourtiere [FONT="Comic Sans MS"]This is a recipe from a friend of mine, its a keeper. 1 pound of ground pork per pie (or 1/2 lb pork and 1/2 lb of ground beef) 1/4 of an onion 1 tsp of sage 1/2 tsp of poultry seasoning salt and pepper to taste (dash of celery salt if you like) Mix and cook till meat turns brown, If excess juice, then pour it out but you do want some juice otherwise the pie will be dry/tough. Put browned meat mixture into the pie shell, put top crust on and bake till golden brown. If the sage is really strong, then cut back on the amount, otherwise taste test to be sure. Edit: I also use a LOT more onion. I do the whole onion myself, but I thought I'd put in the recipe as it was given to me, not my edited version![/FONT] 3 stars 1 reviews
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