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Old 12-14-2006, 09:33 AM   #41
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I am a girl!! I am a girl!!

And a relatively reliable source, usually, though I can steer you wrong with the best of them.

Like I mentioned, I work for University of Missouri Extension and we make a point of having good info.

Thanks, skilletlicker, for your vote of confidence.
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Old 12-14-2006, 10:06 AM   #42
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A girl........Well bless yo little pea-picken heart...Certainly no offense meant when I refered to you as "he"...I trust that none was taken......
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Old 12-14-2006, 10:57 AM   #43
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I never bother to pay higher prices to buy eggs that are advertised as being "lower in cholesterol, higher in protein & Omega 3", etc., etc., because I notice that none of these producers actually TELL you what they're feeding these chickens in order to produce these AWESOME credentials. I do, however, buy eggs (& chicken, goat, pork, & bison) from a local organic/free-range farmer who pasture-raises his livestock. And he's right around the corner from me, so yes I DO know exactly how his livestock is raised pasture-raised. (As an aside - visiting his free-range pork is a real hoot. He raises heritage breed red Tamworth pigs that live free in acres & acres of fenced forest land, yet are really friendly. Sort of makes it hard to eat the delicious pork they provide.)

I raised pet chickens - for the eggs - for many years. As Sparrowgrass has said, the fact that my birds received all sorts of weeds, bugs, & table scraps on a daily basis made a HUGE difference in the quality of the eggs. As far as the scientific value - I neither knew nor cared. All I knew was that they were GREAT eggs, & my neighbors & family clammored for them.
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Old 12-14-2006, 11:57 AM   #44
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Did you know that having a chicken or two out in the yard will cut down on the ticks that may be lurking there? They are one of the few birds that eat the little critters.
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Old 12-14-2006, 12:14 PM   #45
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Actually, Guinea Hens hold the gold star as far as tick predation goes.

My "girls" had a lovely cedar-shingled coop & a large covered run to protect them from the dogs, fox, racoons, & weasels always trying for a quick chicken dinner.

However, when I planned to be working in the garden, I always brought a hen or 2 out with me. They were a hoot. Perfectly content to follow me around picking up weed seedlings & bugs as I weeded & turned over soil. I always brought out heavy-breed chickens that couldn't fly, rather than the light breeds I also kept. This way I didn't have to bother clipping wings or worrying about birds getting frightened & flying off on me.
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Old 12-14-2006, 12:23 PM   #46
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If you want a useful amount of Omega-3, take fish oil tablets.

A vast majority of Americans consume a lot more protein than they actually need for good health.

The difference in cholesterol levels among eggs is not significant. Either with Eggland's or generic eggs, you get more than you should.

I make these points to say that micro decisions about eggs are not necessary. Eat them because you like them, not because you are relying on them for some nutritional component.
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Old 12-14-2006, 12:49 PM   #47
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Andy M.....

You Da Man!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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Old 05-30-2008, 10:41 AM   #48
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hello all,

i have run across this forum and wish to respond to all who seem to be confused about egglands best!

first and foremost, read the packages on the different varieties of egglands. some ARE cage free, organic, etc. you MAY be getting the range free eggs, but unless u are buying the cage free...then no.

i've noticed people talking about "what" they feed the hens and what makes these eggs different from others. it's exactly that, it's what they FEED the hens that produces a more nutritious egg. the feed that these hens eat is an all vegetarian feed-so no animal by product! :) The feed has also excluded hormones and antibiotics, which are commonly found in other feeds. In turn, these hens produce eggs that are higher in lutein, vitamin e, omega 3, and iodine; and lower in cholesterol and saturated fat, by significant amounts.

another thing people seem to question is what the difference between brown and white eggs are. Simple, white hens lay white eggs, red hens lay brown varieties. some say they taste a difference, other than that there is no difference.
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Old 05-30-2008, 12:47 PM   #49
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bridgetk3 View Post
another thing people seem to question is what the difference between brown and white eggs are. Simple, white hens lay white eggs, red hens lay brown varieties. some say they taste a difference, other than that there is no difference.
I raised egg layers,they were white hens, they had brown eggs, only different I could ascertain was the color of the yolks , they were darker. The eggs tastes the same as white. The yolks were possibly darker because of the feed I gave them, non chemical, organic feed. I wish I still had those wonderful egg layers, they died of old age and I did not use them for cooking, only for the eggs.
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Old 05-30-2008, 01:32 PM   #50
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All vegetarian feed? I was under the impression that chickens need meat in their diet.
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