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Old 08-27-2015, 05:55 PM   #11
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It can be difficult to determine just what is a " low simmer." The problem is, people have varying ideas of simmer.
They shouldn't To simmer means to cook at just below a boil, when you see gentle bubbling. Boiling happens at 212°F, so a simmer is below that - around 190 to 205. It's not exact and a few degrees won't make enough difference to matter.
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Old 08-27-2015, 10:07 PM   #12
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Ok, again I will weigh in. I agree with DCSaute but use a little different technique, which I will explain. My water comes from a well 90 foot below ground. The temperature is a constant 43 degrees year round, from the tap. I place enough cold tap water into a pot to cover the eggs, and it doesn't matter whether I'm cooking 1 egg, or two dozen in a large pot. I place the pot over my largest burner, uncovered, and cook over medium-high flame on my gas stove top. I bring the water up to the temperature where it just starts to boil, them turn the heat down until the water is kept at about 200 degrees. It's still hot, but does not jostle the eggs around. I start timing from when the water started boiling, 2 minutes, 40 seconds for perfect soft boiled eggs, that's with solid egg white, and soft yolks, or for seven minutes for hard-boiled eggs. There is never a cracked egg in the pot.

If I'm going to use the eggs immediately, I pour of the hot water, and bounce the eggs around in the pot to craze the shell, then immerse them in the running, cold tap water for about a minute. This cools them enough to handle, but still remain fairly warm inside. The shell comes away very easily, so long as you break that first membrane between the shell and the egg white. I get whole, perfect eggs nearly every time.

Water boils at around 212 degrees F. The egg white starts solidifying at around 180 degrees F. So I bring the water up to 212', but just barely, and then reduce the flame to keep them around 200', plenty hot enough to cook the eggs, but not hot enough to bounce them around in the pot, so there are no cracked shells.

Now I admit that I would have to use another stove for a while to get the burner settings right for the method I use. But by watching the water behaviour, it should be a simple thing to learn.

I do the same thing with poached eggs, and they come out perfect as well, except that I season the water with salt and pepper before gently putting the egg into the hot, but still water. I occasionally jiggle them with a spoon to see how done the egg whites are. When the egg white is firm, and the yolk still soft, I use a slotted spoon to remove the perfectly poached egg.

There you go, yet another technique for making perfect boiled, and poached eggs.

My way isn't the only way. Other methods are equally effective. What determines whether an egg is perfectly cooked is how much heat is applied, and for how long. You can even bake the darned things in the oven and get the same results. Heat does the work. Master the heat, and you've mastered the egg.

Seeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 08-27-2015, 10:38 PM   #13
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I put the eggs in a pot of cold water, bring to a boil, then take it off the burner and cover for 10 minutes. Empty the pot and refill with cold water, then put the eggs back in to cool.
I do mine exactly the same way, and it's worked perfectly for years.

Carry on and let the debate go on, I'm done and happy.
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Old 08-27-2015, 10:40 PM   #14
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I put the eggs in a pot of cold water, bring to a boil, then take it off the burner and cover for 10 minutes. Empty the pot and refill with cold water, then put the eggs back in to cool.

I do mine this way too, though I drag it out to 12 minutes...
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Old 08-27-2015, 11:30 PM   #15
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Dawg, you're such a rebel.
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Old 08-27-2015, 11:46 PM   #16
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The Last Word on Hard-Cooked Eggs?

I even add a few ice cubes!

CG, glad you found your perfect method!
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Old 08-28-2015, 12:42 AM   #17
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Which of the methods mentioned works best if you don't let your eggs age before boiling, I wonder
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Old 08-28-2015, 01:11 AM   #18
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Which of the methods mentioned works best if you don't let your eggs age before boiling, I wonder
If eggs are hard to peel and you're making the eggs for something like egg salad, there's no need to peel the eggs. Just cut them in half, scoop them out of the shell with a spoon and chop.
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Old 08-28-2015, 01:32 AM   #19
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Originally Posted by Cheryl J View Post
I put the eggs in a pot of cold water, bring to a boil, then take it off the burner and cover for 10 minutes. Empty the pot and refill with cold water, then put the eggs back in to cool.
That was my old, trusty way, except the whites stuck to the shells frequently. Hence, trying yet another way.

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I do mine this way too, though I drag it out to 12 minutes...
I'm a 12-minuter too. Or was. I'm learning to like a less-cooked yolk center.

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Originally Posted by Kayelle View Post
If eggs are hard to peel and you're making the eggs for something like egg salad, there's no need to peel the eggs. Just cut them in half, scoop them out of the shell with a spoon and chop.
Good idea, but I rarely make "egg salad". I usually want them to look pretty when they are hard-cooked.

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Which of the methods mentioned works best if you don't let your eggs age before boiling, I wonder
And yet another reason I love this new-to-me method. When/if we get to the Farmers' Market, I like buying a dozen or two fresh eggs from the farmer. Those eggs are only a day or two away from Mrs. Cluck, so they're pretty fresh. Guess what? THEY peel clean and smooth, too.
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Old 08-28-2015, 01:51 AM   #20
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That was my old, trusty way, except the whites stuck to the shells frequently. Hence, trying yet another way.


I'm a 12-minuter too. Or was. I'm learning to like a less-cooked yolk center.


Good idea, but I rarely make "egg salad". I usually want them to look pretty when they are hard-cooked.


And yet another reason I love this new-to-me method. When/if we get to the Farmers' Market, I like buying a dozen or two fresh eggs from the farmer. Those eggs are only a day or two away from Mrs. Cluck, so they're pretty fresh. Guess what? THEY peel clean and smooth, too.
He he he...non aged boiled eggs that peel nicely? Which method was your method? Nevermind, I'll scroll back and use your method.
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The Last Word on Hard-Cooked Eggs? Over the ages there have been many threads with many posts regarding many ways to hard-cook an egg. [URL="http://www.discusscooking.com/forums/f22/how-do-you-boil-an-egg-26432.html"]http://www.discusscooking.com/forums/f22/how-do-you-boil-an-egg-26432.html[/URL] [URL="http://www.discusscooking.com/forums/f22/iso-hard-boiled-egg-basics-84378.html"]http://www.discusscooking.com/forums/f22/iso-hard-boiled-egg-basics-84378.html[/URL] [URL="http://www.discusscooking.com/forums/f22/differing-opinions-for-the-pefect-hard-boiled-egg-45814.html"]http://www.discusscooking.com/forums/f22/differing-opinions-for-the-pefect-hard-boiled-egg-45814.html[/URL] [URL="http://www.discusscooking.com/forums/f22/how-to-make-the-perfect-boiled-egg-53851.html"]http://www.discusscooking.com/forums/f22/how-to-make-the-perfect-boiled-egg-53851.html[/URL] And on, and on... In the movie "Bull Durham", Annie Savoy states "I've tried 'em all, I really have..." when she says her monologue equating religion to baseball. That's how I've felt about hard-cooking eggs. I've tried them all. I think I have finally found the true way. About a month ago, Serious Eats put up an old article about hard-cooked eggs. I never tried it that way before, so I gave it a go. Cue the Monkees, 'cuz I'm a Believer! [URL="http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2009/10/perfect-boiled-eggs-recipe.html"][B][U]Perfect Boiled Eggs[/U][/B][/URL] It's so simple. Bring a pot of water to a boil (I've used a 2-quart for two eggs with great results). When the water comes to a full boil, immerse your eggs into the boiling water (I use my spider) and boil for 30 seconds with the cover OFF the pot. After 30 seconds, cover pot and immediately reduce to a low simmer. Simmer for required length of time depending on desired doneness. (I have a glass-top stove, so I turn the burner off, slide the pot half-off the hot spot, then turn the heat back to low when it looks like "barely simmer" state has been reached.) 11-12 minutes gives me perfectly done hard cooked eggs. As soon as time is up, remove the eggs from the simmering water (again with the spider, I am) and put into a bowl of iced water. Results? Firm white, cooked yolk, no green ring, and very easy to peel - usually without any dimple in the wide end of the egg. You do not need salt/vinegar/baking soda. You do not need to put a tiny whole in the large end of the shell. You don't need to crack the egg shells as you dump the eggs in the ice water. Easy Peasy, perfect eggs. The eggs in the salads I made for tonight's dinner were [URL="http://www.discusscooking.com/forums/f104/dinner-wednesday-8-26-2015-a-93637.html#post1433884"]8-minute eggs[/URL]. Just the barest of "done" where they meet the white, the rest of the yolk was soft but not liquidy. Kinda like a paste, but in a nicer way. Himself likes good, runny-yolk sunnyside up ones, and likes a looser yolk just about anywhere. I've just moved away from the "give me a rock-hard yolk, darn it!" stage. This is as soft as I can go. The beauty of cooking them this way gives you the option of taking one out with the spider and cooling it earlier than the second one. Just NOW thought of that! [IMG]https://arriverabooks.files.wordpress.com/2015/03/bang-your-head.gif[/IMG] Like the man said in the long-ago Alka-Seltzer commercial, "[URL=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9qdfMYFl0Ic]Try it, you'll like it[/URL]". [SIZE="1"]* I hope I didn't go over quota with Pop Culture references...[/SIZE]:ermm: 3 stars 1 reviews
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