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Old 11-01-2005, 11:00 PM   #11
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I did the same thing you two did, braid, brush with egg and sprinkled seasame on top (tho mine was black seasame, since that's what I have). Maybe I don't have the proper taste buds?? I think I need to go buy some store bought challah to see what one tastes like.


Would it be too much to ask for you both to PM me or post the recipe on this thread? Make sure the recipe isn't exactly like what it states in your recipe book, don't want to get in trouble.
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Old 11-02-2005, 11:36 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yakuta
..I am not worried about getting into trouble because it's from a cookbook so far as the right credits are given (which I am doing) it should be fine...
Yakuta:

Giving credit does not eliminate copyright infringement. In order to post a recipe out of a cookbook, you must request and receive written permission from the author. Then, if a permission is granted, it would be for one specific use, not for repeated use wherever you choose.
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Old 11-02-2005, 11:45 AM   #13
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Thanks Yukta! I copied it down, just in case it gets wiped out later. :)
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Old 11-02-2005, 12:19 PM   #14
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Thanks for clarifying Andy - As you can see I am ignorant about this. I just love to cook and collect books and recipes.

Anyway, the site admin can get rid of this so no one can get into trouble. Next time I will send it as a private topic. GB you can help delete it. Thxs.

Enjoy htc.
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Old 11-04-2005, 03:43 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by htc on 10-28-2005
Degassing (or punching down) vs. Kneading

I don't understand the difference between these two. I am learning a lot from the bread makers apprentice book. I am in the process of my 2nd rise for challah bread. The book says to degas or punch down for 2 minutes. They say degassing is handling the dough very gently to retain as much gas as possible. Gently fold the dough.

But when I fold the dough (I did this for about 2 min), trying to be as gentle as possible. I saw little air (?) bubles form that I think popped. It ended up looking a lot like the dough from the first rise, though the texture is different.

I don't really see the difference between the two techniques. ?
IMHO, degassing, punching down and kneading are three different techniques, not two. If the focus is on redistributing yeast in the dough during a rise (not the final rise) and eliminating *large* air pockets, then the scale would be from degassing (most gentle - preserves small air pockets but eliminates large ones) to kneading (most robust - redistributes yeast effectively but destroys *all or most* air pockets).

Kneading
- kneading is - ummmmm - kneading. Just have a light hand and don't add xtra flour. A few "turns" are sufficient. (Sometimes, as you knead, large air pockets give out little farting sounds as they burst; I think that is a riot.)

Punching down
- used to deflate dough during a rise "in the bowl". After the dough has about risen 1-1/2 to 2 times the original bulk, you punch it down with your fist (it deflates) and then, usually, you flip it (to bring the oiled part to the top) and recover with plastic wrap.

Degassing
- a gentler technique than punching it, since you achieve the same effect *without* eliminating the small air pockets. This involves stretching and folding the dough (rather than punching it).
For a general explanation of this technique (with pix), go to http://home.earthlink.net/~myjunketc...adWithBiga.htm and scroll down to the section titled The Optional Neat Trick.

Here's an *even gentler* approach to degassing, which is a variation on the above link - keep the dough *in* the bowl (since removing it from the bowl to the board will deflate a very wet dough) and apply the technique like this

One usually degasses dough when it has risen about 1-1/2 times the original bulk. Two "strech and folds" are normally sufficient. You'll notice that the dough rises faster after doing this; wait until it has risen again to 1-1/2 to 2 times the original bulk and proceed with the shaping according to the recipe.

Wet doughs benefit from using the degassing over the punch-down technique since they are very fragile and, in general, you want as much as possible to preserve the smaller air pockets in order to get an open structure (eg - holes in the interior of the bread) in the final product. This includes breads like ciabatta or baguettes.

If you're making challah, which is not as fragile, you could punch it down.

Hope this helps -
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Old 11-04-2005, 07:35 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by htc
I did the same thing you two did, braid, brush with egg and sprinkled seasame on top (tho mine was black seasame, since that's what I have). Maybe I don't have the proper taste buds?? I think I need to go buy some store bought challah to see what one tastes like.


Would it be too much to ask for you both to PM me or post the recipe on this thread? Make sure the recipe isn't exactly like what it states in your recipe book, don't want to get in trouble.
Htc, I'll send you a pm and we can go from there...Sorry I'm just now answering you..
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Old 11-07-2005, 06:21 PM   #17
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Wow Subf, tha's great info!! Thanks for taking time out to post! I am amazed that you know so much about bread baking.
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Old 11-08-2005, 01:21 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by htc on 7Nov2005
Wow Subf, tha's great info!! Thanks for taking time out to post!
Thanks!

Actually, all of the techniques I cited are "degassing", since they eliminate air bubbles in the dough. What was called "degassing" in my post is more precisely a "strech and fold" method of degassing. As noted, you can do it on the board or in the bowl.

Glad you liked the post Do I get karma? (The pix are time-consuming to create ) SF [203]
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