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Old 03-07-2005, 11:33 AM   #1
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I need a remedy! Cinnamon Raisin Bread help

I love to bake homemade cinnamon-raisin bread, but I'm having a problem with the rolled layers of cinnamon filling separating after it's baked and sliced. My technique is simple, after the dough has risen twice, I roll it into a 9 by 12 rectangle, spread it with about 1 T of butter, and sprinkle the cinnamon-sugar mixture all over...about 1 to 2 inches from the edges. I then roll it up tight, seal the seam, and place it in the pan to bake. After it's baked and cooled (at least 30 minutes cooled) when sliced, there are big gaps that separate and pull apart, where it was rolled.

I checked the Baker's 911 site, and they said to press down with the edge of your palm on the edge of each roll EACH time you make one roll over..to seal it , but that doesn't work because 1) the filling prevents the dough from adhereing, and 2) you make quite a mess on your hand...losing some of the filling as it sticks and gets all over the place.

I think I remember seeing a trick where you take a skewer and poke several holes from the top, all the way to the bottom, of the rolled, ready to bake loaf, once it's in the pan, to make sure all the layers stick. resulting in a cohesive loaf (???), but I could be wrong. Any ideas?

Thanks in advance :)

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Old 03-07-2005, 01:36 PM   #2
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...send all your ugly bread to me

and if you won't do that then another suggestion would be to put the filling in one roll at a time - filling, one complete roll, press, filling, one complete roll, press. I'm not a bread baker but it sounds like an option - there are some here who are excellent at bread baking and will probably have the solution for you.
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Old 03-07-2005, 02:16 PM   #3
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I would send it to you, but it's usually gone before anyone can really look at it. As they say, beauty is only skin deep LOL.

In any event, I thought of your solution, and if no one has any other ideas, that's what I'm probably going to do. Thanks! :)
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Old 03-07-2005, 11:58 PM   #4
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Lisa - you didn't say if your recipe is for one loaf or two ... but here are a couple of thoughts:

(1) The butter spread on the dough might (probably is) one of the problems, (2) When you are introducing the butter-cinnamon-sugar onto the dough. Remember, you are greasing the bowl to keep the dough from sticking to it ...

I mix my butter into the dough ... I don't spread it on as part of a "jelly-roll" - it's just not going to stick that way. Well, it "might" using a different technique ... but I doubt it.

Here is my thinking ... think about puff pastry ... layers of butter that keep layers of pastry seperate. It sounds like your method is giving you the same "sorta-kinda" result ... too seperate and flaky. Butter is 20% water, which is going to create steam ... spread on to a layer of dough it will seperate the layers, incorporated into the batter it's impact is going to be on cell structure (crumb/texture).

Here is what I do .... right or wrong ....

After the dough proofs (rises) the first time ... I punch it down, roll it out, and sprinkle the cinnamon-sugar on it (no butter). When I roll it up I do it backwards (instead of toward me and sealing it with the palm of my hands I roll it away from me and use my finger tips because I can get a tighter roll and seal that way (which might be a problem for someone with fingernails) and I seal it about every 1/2 to 1 turn. When I finish forming the loaf I put it into the bread pan for the second proofing (rise) - and then bake. More often than not - it stays together like it should.
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Old 03-08-2005, 01:33 AM   #5
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Michael..I didn't even think of that, and I make my own puff pastry! The only thing is, I only use 1 T of butter, but you're right, it's like the dough is the 'greased bowl' and besides keeping it from sticking to itself during a roll, I'm encouraging the 'layer' effect. I will definitely omit spreading the butter on the dough, and add it with the 2T of butter that's already worked into the dough when combined and kneaded.

Now, my one question is, how do you get each roll (toward or away from you), to seal? Doesn't the cinnamon-sugar mix prevent adhesion when you pinch or press the dough in with your fingers, with each roll? That's the problem I had with rolling and trying to seal down -- cinnamon-sugar lifting and sticking to my fingers, and a hard time sealing each roll due to the grainy-powdery layer of the cinnamon-sugar.
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Old 03-08-2005, 12:21 PM   #6
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Lisa, I'd definitely follow Michael's suggestions. One way to seal the dough as you roll even though you have the cinnamon-sugar mixture on it is to leave an approximately one inch edge around the dough that you don't cover with the sugar. That way, the edges of the dough will be able to adhere to itself and you won't be battling the filling.


Also, try using a little less cinnamon-sugar mixture on the bread. That way, on the second rise (once it's rolled and in the pan before you bake it) the dough will be able to adhere to itself in places preventing the gaps where your filling is.

Good luck and keep experimenting--it sounds like your family will love you for it!
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Old 03-08-2005, 12:48 PM   #7
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Before spreading the filling over your dough, brush with egg-wash. The technique will glue the layers together, similar to making the pastry of ravioli stick together. The egg-wash is not apparent in the finished product, but will help bind the layers together.

I would think that Michael's method will work great as well. But you have to make sure that the dough is sticky enough to adhere to itself.

You might add a bit more water to your dough. A dry dough is hard to work with (well it's really easier as it doesn't stick to your hands as much, but you know what I mean ).

A moist and sticky dough, coupled with good rolling technique and a bit of egg-wash should solve your layering problem.

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Old 03-08-2005, 02:02 PM   #8
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Thank you, Goodweed :) I didn't even think of that..great idea! It just so happens that I'm making two loaves this weekend, so I can try both methods. I'll be a happy camper when I see that beautiful spiral of cinnamon, minus the gaping crevice.
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Old 03-08-2005, 09:07 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PA Baker
Lisa, I'd definitely follow Michael's suggestions. One way to seal the dough as you roll even though you have the cinnamon-sugar mixture on it is to leave an approximately one inch edge around the dough that you don't cover with the sugar. That way, the edges of the dough will be able to adhere to itself and you won't be battling the filling.


Also, try using a little less cinnamon-sugar mixture on the bread. That way, on the second rise (once it's rolled and in the pan before you bake it) the dough will be able to adhere to itself in places preventing the gaps where your filling is.

Good luck and keep experimenting--it sounds like your family will love you for it!
Thanks, PaBaker :) I do leave about 1 inch or more on all sides, and I spread a medium amount of cinnamon sugar evenly over the dough.

My problem was getting the dough, as I roll it, to adhere over the cinnamon-sugar. No matter what I do, it doesn't happen, so I figured that using egg white instead of butter, leaving the dough a little sticky, and pinching and pressing in, should solve it. Wish me luck! I'll report back! :)
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Old 03-19-2005, 01:05 PM   #10
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I just wanted to thank everyone for all the amazing advice. I made my two loaves this morning, using the egg wash to adhere to the cinnamon-sugar mix, which made the roll and pinch method extremely easy, the dough sealing perfectly -- and due to that, I was rewarded with a flawless cinnamon spiral when I sliced into it! Thank you all, again! :)
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