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Old 09-06-2006, 09:49 PM   #21
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Ok...all confused now....

Can you imagine the confusion out there. Tradition tugging one way, modern America tugging another. "What the h--- you doing with my flowers? They are for so & so, not you!" Where did we begin missing the boat? Was it the '60's?
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Old 09-06-2006, 09:50 PM   #22
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Dunno Marion, but I wasn't born til the late 60's so I think it was likely more in the 80's, the famous "ME" decade.
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Old 09-06-2006, 09:56 PM   #23
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80's

That may be true Alix. It would've been the '80's before I began noticing a change. And I'm NOT telling you or anyone else my age!
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Old 09-06-2006, 09:59 PM   #24
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I was still a pup during the 80's. Didn't start high school 'til 1990.
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Old 09-06-2006, 10:04 PM   #25
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What da h---?

Didn't start highschool till the '90's? You aren't old enough to cook! Does your mommie know you have the oven on?
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Old 09-06-2006, 10:06 PM   #26
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Marion...sssshhhhh! MRS BigDog might not be happy to hear you say that about her hubby.
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Old 09-06-2006, 10:21 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MarionW
Didn't start highschool till the '90's? You aren't old enough to cook! Does your mommie know you have the oven on?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alix
Marion...sssshhhhh! MRS BigDog might not be happy to hear you say that about her hubby.
ROTFL!

She's only 348 days older then me . . . . 349 on leap year!
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Old 09-06-2006, 10:37 PM   #28
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Originally Posted by VeraBlue
I can top that, Andy...I never drink scotch before Thanksgiving or after Easter!
For me it's gin and tonic in the summer and Crown Royal the rest of the year.

I'm first generation and SO is third or fourth. We both are from lower middle class backgrounds and both feel the same. I would guess folks that live in an urban environment in ethnic neighborhoods do this a lot. Outside of that urban environment, the mix of backgrounds in the suburbs makes it impossible to predict.
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Old 09-07-2006, 01:07 AM   #29
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Sorry I disagree with most of you. I consider it poor manners to take food or drink to a party. I am the hostess and I do not want food or drinks to mess up my dinner plans. I plan what I am serving and do not want a casserole from a guest or a dessert. It is considered impolite to not serve but to serve is awkard too. Wine I put away for another time. Just keep your food at home when I invite people I expect to do it all. When someone asks what to bring I tell them nothing as my menu is planned.
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Old 09-07-2006, 01:10 AM   #30
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dad is first gen irish american, mom is second - norwegian american.
we were taught 2 basic rules.

1. never show up empty handed, anywhere, no matter what.
we normally bring wine AND italian or polish baked goods (since there's so many good bakeries of each around me), AND/or flowers.

every time i go to my parents, we bring veggies and herbs from the garden, as well as a few frozen meals i've prepared, so my mom can get a break from dinner for a coupla nights. same goes when we visit my siblings. it may seem weird, but they love my cooking. or so they say...lol?

even when i go to my buddy's house for monday night football, i bring a 12 pack and a pizza or two. neither goes to waste with my friends, and is always appreciated.
i remember we were having our monday night get together at one of the guys' house, who's wife was a bit iffy about what we might do to her place since she didn't know everyone. some of the guys are very large, very scary looking people.
i showed up early, with flowers and wine for her (i left the beer and pizza in the truck), and she seemed to relax a bit. especially after a glass or two of the wine. not to mention how she kept trying to set me up with all of her friends. i was semi-single at the time.
anyway, it was a case that proved the theory. never show up empty handed.



2. everyone is always invited. period. all get togethers, from the biggest party to the simplest meal, no one is ever excluded. even strangers.
if it should so happen that you think you don't like someone, you'll be surprised at the friends you make, rather than the enemies you'll make by not including them. a little friendship and hospitality goes a long way.
my mom says that this is a norwegian practice from years ago. if you were having a get together, you'd place a lit candle or pot of oil in the front of the house as sort of an "open house" sign. anyone who passes by is invited in to the party, and to eat.
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