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Old 10-22-2007, 06:24 PM   #21
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Yes,go to the doctor to make sure.I once got a spider bite that was so bad I could have sworn it was a Brown Recluse it turned out to just a really really bad spider bite.I had no idea they can get this bad.
But this is because of your bad bug karma, jp!
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Old 10-22-2007, 06:28 PM   #22
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But this is because of your bad bug karma, jp!
ProbablyI already have bad bee karma
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Old 10-22-2007, 06:52 PM   #23
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My nephew was bitten by a brown recluse and he had to go in daily to a wound care clinic and have the dead tissue cut out. He let it go hoping it would get better but the pain was getting so bad he had to go see his Doctor.
Don't let it go.
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Old 10-22-2007, 07:16 PM   #24
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If you are in Florida, it is highly unlikely that you have been bitten by a brown recluse spider. Check the range maps. And google "brown recluse spider distribution" or "myth of the brown recluse". You will find a number of articles in which arachnologists state that these spiders are either "absent from" or "extremely rare" in Florida.

I have read several articles about the frequency with which idiopathic necrotic wounds are misdiagnosed as spider bites. There's no way to test for spider venom, so oftentimes physicians, not being entomologists, will fall back on the "spider bite" explanation if the patient suggests it.

If you have been bitten by an arthropod of some sort, it is much more likely to have been a critter that seeks blood meals from humans--a tick, bedbug, flea, or assassin bug, for example. There are also many other possible causes of bite-like lesions and necrotic wounds.

If your doctor agrees that you have been bitten by a brown recluse, he is almost certainly wrong. Make sure that he considers other possible causes of your lesion and does not simply fall back on the usually-incorrect "spider bite" diagnosis because it is easier than searching for the actual cause.

Keep an eye on the wound. Watch for any changes. Most likely it's nothing serious, but if it gets worse rather than better over the next few days, make sure you have it examined by a knowledgable dermatologist.

Take care!

[p.s. I got some of this information from an article by Richard S. Vetter, of the Entomology Dept at UC Irvine. I can't post the link here, but you can google his name to find it.

[Also, I currently work as a biologist in an entomology lab. ]
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Old 10-22-2007, 08:27 PM   #25
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Actually the BR is in Florida.

The brown recluse spider, Loxosceles reclusa Gertsch & Mulaik, is frequently reported in Florida as a cause of necrotic lesions in humans. For example, in the year 2000 alone, Loft (2001) reported that the Florida Poison Control Network had recorded nearly 300 alleged cases of brown recluse bites in the state; a subset of 95 of these bites was reported in the 21 counties (essentially Central Florida) under the jurisdiction of the regional poison control center in Tampa.

And here is the case and first hand testimony of a victim (with GRAPHIC pictures) of someone bitten in Florida. Looking at these photos and the necrotic tissue damage, there is no denying it was the BR.

Notice this victim says:

“Well, well, well. Here I am again writing the story of how someone in my family was bitten by a brown recluse spider. A spider the experts claim does not exsist in my area.”


The wikipedia map showing the BR area of habit is wrong.
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Old 10-22-2007, 08:41 PM   #26
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From what I recall from a science show recently.....you really should go to the doctor. Soon.
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Old 10-22-2007, 08:46 PM   #27
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If you are in Florida, it is highly unlikely that you have been bitten by a brown recluse spider


Highly unlikely yes. But is does and did happen. His aunt had the spider with her and it was possitively identified as a b.r.
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Old 10-22-2007, 10:09 PM   #28
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Actually the BR in Florida.

The brown recluse spider, Loxosceles reclusa Gertsch & Mulaik, is frequently reported in Florida as a cause of necrotic lesions in humans. For example, in the year 2000 alone, Loft (2001) reported that the Florida Poison Control Network had recorded nearly 300 alleged cases of brown recluse bites in the state; a subset of 95 of these bites was reported in the 21 counties (essentially Central Florida) under the jurisdiction of the regional poison control center in Tampa.
Um....If you actually READ the page you quote above, you will see that the very next sentence says that not a single specimen of L. reclusa has ever been collected in Tampa.

The whole point of the page is to say that despite the number of reported "brown recluse bites", there is very little evidence that the necrotic lesions observed in those patients were actually caused by these spiders.

The article says that the only recorded instances of L. reclusa in the state of Florida come from a few isolated specimens, and a couple of populations in single buildings, which were most likely transported from places where the species is more common, and which were subsequently eradicated.

So, yes, there is a remote possibility that you could be bitten by a brown recluse spider in Florida. But, as I said, it is extremely unlikely.


Quote:
And here is the case and first hand testimony of a victim (with GRAPHIC pictures) of someone bitten in Florida. Looking at these photos and the necrotic tissue damage, there is no denying it was the BR.


How can you say that? There are all kinds of conditions that can cause necrotic tissue damage like that. The mother mentioned that the child was found to have staph--how do you know that the staph was not the cause of the necrosis and kidney failure rather than a sequela from a spider or insect bite?

The ONLY way to know for SURE that you have been bitten by a brown recluse is to catch the spider in the act and to bring it to an arachnologist or entomologist for positive ID.

Do you have any idea how difficult it is to identify spiders to species? You absolutely MUST use a microscope, even to reliably identify most specimens to the family level, let alone genus and species.

Quote:
The wikipedia map showing the BR area of habit is wrong.


No, it's not. Though some isolated specimens and small populations (i.e. occupying a single building) have been found outside of the range, the range accurately shows where established breeding populations of this spider are known to occur. And because it is of medical significance, its whereabouts are pretty well known to the people who study these things.
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Old 10-22-2007, 10:18 PM   #29
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Um....If you actually READ the page you quote above, you will see that the very next sentence says that not a single specimen of L. reclusa has ever been collected in Tampa.

The whole point of the page is to say that despite the number of reported "brown recluse bites", there is very little evidence that the necrotic lesions observed in those patients were actually caused by these spiders.

The article says that the only recorded instances of L. reclusa in the state of Florida come from a few isolated specimens, and a couple of populations in single buildings, which were most likely transported from places where the species is more common, and which were subsequently eradicated.

So, yes, there is a remote possibility that you could be bitten by a brown recluse spider in Florida. But, as I said, it is extremely unlikely.




How can you say that? There are all kinds of conditions that can cause necrotic tissue damage like that. The mother mentioned that the child was found to have staph--how do you know that the staph was not the cause of the necrosis and kidney failure rather than a sequela from a spider or insect bite?

The ONLY way to know for SURE that you have been bitten by a brown recluse is to catch the spider in the act and to bring it to an arachnologist or entomologist for positive ID.

Do you have any idea how difficult it is to identify spiders to species? You absolutely MUST use a microscope, even to reliably identify most specimens to the family level, let alone genus and species.



No, it's not. Though some isolated specimens and small populations (i.e. occupying a single building) have been found outside of the range, the range accurately shows where established breeding populations of this spider are known to occur. And because it is of medical significance, its whereabouts are pretty well known to the people who study these things.
Ok. Living in Alabama, which most say is not the home of the BR, I've seen it and have had friends biten by it. Confirmed. Fact. And then I read facts from first hand victims in Florida. Want to call them a liar....well email 'em.
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Old 10-22-2007, 10:28 PM   #30
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Okay, let's chill a little here. This discussion doesn't need to get into a "knowledge" contest.

Doesn't matter whether the spider is in Florida or not. What matters is that it IS possible that Renee could have been bitten by one. Don't forget that it takes only one egg in thousands for a person to contract salmonella poisoning.

Okay, everyone back to your corners.
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