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Old 10-30-2007, 10:11 AM   #51
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I guess mine need an intervention program!! They do like grass of any kind, however. We've owned many cats and they all went and the present furchildren go nutty when in the presence of catnip. I'll have to look for this cat thyme and see if this has the same effect.
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Old 10-30-2007, 10:27 AM   #52
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It is a silver grey erect woody bush that grows up to about a foot and has little pink flowers. Withstands the wind well. Late spring is usually when you can get it over here, flowering summer/autumn. Teucrium marum is the botanical name. Supposedly smells similar to cat mint but I don't find it quite so noxious!
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Old 10-30-2007, 10:43 AM   #53
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Do your cats "attack" the bush??? It's hopeless here in Texas.........if I even try and bring home a catnip plant (and I've even put it inside an old gerbil cage) the inmates eventually annihilate it. I've even thought of planting it in a hanging basket to see if it would survive but haven't tried it yet. Does this cat thyme tolerate humid conditions? We live in sauna Houston.
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Old 10-30-2007, 11:09 AM   #54
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Cat thyme is fairly woody and tolerated them rolling over it, just like you have a new pair of shoes and they want to mark it. Every so often they would break off a bit but they don't eat it, just rub themselves with it so it has a bit more longevity.

Perth's summers are quite hot, think last year it got to 47C, (which is what 120-ish F???) but if not, wasn't far off. But we also get rain through summer. Storms. Christmas Day it is usually either boiling hot or pouring with rain and hot. Think it really likes the sun. Perth has a semi-Mediterranean climate but the nature of the plant would suggest it be tolerant of most conditions that weren't cold. Mountain Valley Growers (all one word in the website name with a .com) has a few good pics of it. Wikipedia says it came from Spain which I guess maybe humid at times, just like Perth but not all the time. Houston sounds like Darwin in the Northern Territory. They say it is like walking into a wall at times the humidity is so bad.
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Old 10-30-2007, 11:13 AM   #55
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Just had a look at the USDA zone map and it looks like Texas is okay for it. It is good for zones 5 - 11, and Texas is within that range.
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Old 10-30-2007, 11:25 AM   #56
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haahaha--Darwin in the Northern Territory---too funny------I appreciate Texas for the most part--born and bred here though I'm amused when I'm told that I don't have an accent which I don't. Been posted overseas on and off for 15 years Give me a week with my outlaw cousins in East Texas and I can "drawl" with the best of them. Yes, the weather here is gobsmacking at times. We have literally turned on the AC's at Thanksgiving, Christmas, and Valentine's Day. Most years we don't have killer freezes but you can't be complacent on that issue either. Then one year a northerner will blow in and drop temps 40 degrees in a matter of hours and then all of the tender vegetation will be "Gone With the Wind". Thanks for all your info on the cat thyme. When's the best seasonal temps to plant it? Here, the best time to plant is no later than Mar.
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Old 10-30-2007, 11:36 AM   #57
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In Perth, we can't buy it until about now and then it is in a pot about four inches across and the plant is usually about four inches tall, maybe a bit less, sometimes a bit more. As soon as we get it, we plant it. We are coming into late spring just now. It seems to rain one day a week at the moment but then will be fine for the rest of the time. It hailed on Sat am and apart from some clouds yesterday and today, been fine ever since. Cold but fine. The day before it rains it gets really muggy and warm and everyone complains about the heat, even though it hasn't hit 30C yet! We don't do change very well in Perth! Where I am in the Eastern suburbs, we get the summer winds. There is a golf range about five mins drive (car that is, not golf drive!) from my house that in the height of summer gets winds of around 100kph. The plant seems to be fine in all those conditions. Thinking about it, we could probably plant up to mid-December but would probably have to protect it a bit and keep the water up to it for some time. Summer here isn't kind to new plants, esp with the water restrictions. Mind you, the cats find it too hot for them, so the plant has a chance of establishing itself! Swings and roundabouts...
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Old 10-30-2007, 08:34 PM   #58
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I leave for Houston in 2 weeks so I will look up this catnip thyme. We have a wonderful Mom & Pop local garden center that has specialty herbs, native plants, etc., and I'll check with them to see what they have to say about acquiring some. Grey foliage always looks nice in the garden so we'll see. Maybe my " furry druggies" will enjoy "massaging" with it rather than engaging in mass annihilation. Thanks again for all the info Bilby :)
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