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Old 05-24-2016, 07:22 PM   #31
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That old faucet is pretty cool.

My uncle lived out in the woods. His "kitchen" was a piece of plywood screwed into some 2x4 ledgers on the wall. There was a meat grinder bolted to the edge. He had 3 or 4 rifles on the kitchen wall, sink was a metal washtub. I opened the pantry and there was only like a salt shaker, pepper shaker, garlic salt, and a few cans of veggies.

Flies buzzing around. It was like something out of Texas Chainsaw Massacre. Sheesh. :)
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Old 05-24-2016, 08:29 PM   #32
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When I was in about the 5th or 6th grade my mother remarried and we moved into a little village. The house was a precut bungalow, built in the 1920's, from a company called Aladdin Homes. In the kitchen floor was a small hole that had been the drain for the old oak icebox. The large white wall hung kitchen sink had a porcelain drain board and three taps, one for hot, cold and cistern. The cistern was a large copper tub in the attic that collected rain water from the roof. The cistern had been disconnected by the time we came along. The sink remained for many years after we moved in, then came the big remodel in the 1970's complete with avocado green appliances!
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Old 05-24-2016, 08:45 PM   #33
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Dawg....my first house had green shag carpeting - well, can't really call it carpeting because it was those stick on 'carpet tiles'. LOL. Those went away very soon after we moved in.

JD....wow, you are a very busy guy. I'm really glad that you make the time to come in here and visit with us. Sending hugs to you.

I'm enjoying reading everyone's stories here!
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Old 05-24-2016, 10:48 PM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jd_1138 View Post
...People don't hire maids/cooks anymore...
Yup, what Cheryl said, jd. ~~ My best friend back home used to have a cleaning lady come every week. I love my friend even more than I could love a blood sister if I had one, but you could not pay me enough to clean her house. She is a 1000% certified clutter-bug. She's probably doing her own cleaning now; her hubby was forced to retire when he turned 66. Gotta tighten the purse strings somehow.

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Originally Posted by Janet H View Post
Stuff you don;t see in kitchens these days?

...real linen towels
Come visit me, Janet. I have real linen towels in my kitchen. They hang on a vintage drying rack I got years ago, and I use them regularly for produce and fine glassware.
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Old 05-24-2016, 11:35 PM   #35
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Originally Posted by Janet H View Post
Stuff you don;t see in kitchens these days?

Pie safes
A wood stove
A ice box (that takes block ice)
Long drain boards
A pantry cabinet with built in bins for flour and sugar storage
Oil cloth table covers
real linen towels
I learned to cook on a wooden stove. To this day I can tell the temp of the oven by sticking my hand in it. We also had an icebox. And she had that Hoosier Cabinet with the flour bin and sifter on the bottom. It held 10 pounds of flour. We also had a kitchen table that was all metal and there were two leaves, one at each end. You pulled them out to make it bigger. We also had a double white sink on two legs and the faucets came out of the wall. The top of the deep sink that was on the left was removable for rinsing laundry.

My mother's first washing machine was a Kenmore wringer washer along with a Kenmore fridge and television. The washer was on wheels. You pushed it over to the sink and hung the drain hose over the smaller sink, and would swing the wringer over the deep sink filled with cold water for rinsing. Then you put the laundry through the wringer again so it went into a large laundry basket placed on the floor. The laundry was not ready to hang on the clothesline that was strung between two buildings on a pulley. On the farm, it was strung between the summer kitchen and the barn. When we moved to the city, it was strung between the next door building or a telephone pole and the side of our window. I still miss hanging out laundry and the smell of when you brought it in.

BTW, this is another great thread. Really enjoying it. Thanks.
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Old 05-24-2016, 11:56 PM   #36
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Yup, what Cheryl said, jd. ~~

Come visit me, Janet. I have real linen towels in my kitchen. They hang on a vintage drying rack I got years ago, and I use them regularly for produce and fine glassware.
My mother had real linen cloths. She received her mother's silverware set. Her older sister had kept it for her and gave it to her when she married. It came out every holiday and she used the linen cloths for the final polishing. We would sit down at the table together. She would apply the polish and I gave it the final polish with the linen clothes after it was all washed clean of any polish she might have missed. Those cloths were only used for that purpose. They got washed immediately after we were through. Washed by hand of course.

I was born between two worlds. Growing up during the days of the outhouse to outer space. Pumping water in the summer kitchen to running water in the regular kitchen and then to bottled water.

BTW, do any of you remember having a stack gas heater for hot water? We had one in the kitchen with a large tank of water right beside it. You had to heat it up to do laundry, dishes and take a bath.
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Old 05-25-2016, 12:02 AM   #37
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I was born between two worlds. Growing up during the days of the outhouse to outer space. Pumping water in the summer kitchen to running water in the regular kitchen and then to bottled water.

BTW, do any of you remember having a stack gas heater for hot water? We had one in the kitchen with a large tank of water right beside it. You had to heat it up to do laundry, dishes and take a bath.
I remember watching Ode to Billie Joe (set in the 1950's) in the late 1970's when I was a small kid. And the scene where they get an indoor toilet puzzled me. My mom explained that she had an outhouse when she was little in the 1950's in Mississippi :)

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Old 05-25-2016, 12:40 AM   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Janet H View Post
Stuff you don;t see in kitchens these days?

Pie safes
A wood stove
A ice box (that takes block ice)
Long drain boards
A pantry cabinet with built in bins for flour and sugar storage
Oil cloth table covers
real linen towels
Lehman's.com or Vermont country store has those. I'm getting one for the next Thanksgiving I host.
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Old 05-25-2016, 04:45 PM   #39
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PF, you can also buy oilcloth by the yard. As long as you have a way to finish the edge, you would have sooooo many choices! There are lots of sites that googled up. Here's one of them: Oilcloth by the Yard


Quote:
Originally Posted by Addie View Post
..We also had a kitchen table that was all metal and there were two leaves, one at each end...
Himself's family had a metal one that pulled apart to drop a leaf in. Meanwhile, back in my kitchen, I still have an old metal table. I usually keep the side by the chair up, and use it as a work table to trim beans, peel apples, etc. The other end is just across from the fridge. I lock it up when I'm pulling things from the fresh or frozen compartments when I really have to do a deep dive. It's my cheapskate's version of a cooking island.

When we got that table from my aunt and uncle decades ago, the top was completely covered in green marble contact paper. I left it like that until I decided to promote it upstairs. I was surprised how new looking the Formica was. I had figured my aunt covered it to hide some sins.
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Old 05-25-2016, 05:00 PM   #40
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As a child, a lot of my friends homes had an oilcloth on their kitchen table. The edges were always cut with pinking shears. If their kitchen table was wood, then you can bet it was covered in oilcloth. Since we had an all metal one, my mother never had the table covered except on holidays. The she used a nice tablecloth.

What I remember about oilcloth is that in the summer before AC, it would get very sticky, no matter how much you cleaned it. Try leaning your arms on it or playing cards. Then if you put a hot plate of food on it, it would stick to it.
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