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Old 06-03-2007, 11:39 PM   #1
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What's the difference between poeleing & braising

i've got a book that describes these methods & i can't seem to tell the difference. first the thing is browned (actually not always) & then the lid goes on & the thing inside steams in its own juices. is it the amount of liquid or what? the picture of the poeleing method has a chicken on what they call a matignon (like a mirepoix i guess) & the pic showing braising has a bunch of liquid in the pot also. is the liquid the only difference?

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Old 06-04-2007, 12:22 AM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by baking fool
i've got a book that describes these methods & i can't seem to tell the difference. first the thing is browned (actually not always) & then the lid goes on & the thing inside steams in its own juices. is it the amount of liquid or what? the picture of the poeleing method has a chicken on what they call a matignon (like a mirepoix i guess) & the pic showing braising has a bunch of liquid in the pot also. is the liquid the only difference?
It looks to me as if the liquid is the only difference: One cooks in its own juices, the other cooks in added liquid. I found this interesting site in a Google search: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.: Professional Chef, 7th Edition
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Old 06-04-2007, 09:04 AM   #3
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The difference is that braising calls for liquids being added to the meat. Poeleing does not involve added liquids, just butter and the meat's own juices.
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Old 06-04-2007, 07:07 PM   #4
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that's what i thought, thx for clearing that up.
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Old 06-04-2007, 07:15 PM   #5
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as side note:
a matignon is a mirepoix that is actually meant to be eaten with the dish
originally it was rather mushy and without much texture
but it is served as a side dish
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Old 06-04-2007, 07:16 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GotGarlic
It looks to me as if the liquid is the only difference: One cooks in its own juices, the other cooks in added liquid. I found this interesting site in a Google search: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.: Professional Chef, 7th Edition
that site looks awesome... i might even pick up the actual book.
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Old 06-04-2007, 07:18 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by obiwan9962
as side note:
a matignon is a mirepoix that is actually meant to be eaten with the dish
originally it was rather mushy and without much texture
but it is served as a side dish
i thought it could be strained out after making the sauce/gravy??
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Old 06-04-2007, 07:21 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by baking fool
i thought it could be strained out after making the sauce/gravy??
if you strain it out and then toss it, it is mirepoix
if you keep it and serve it on the side it is a matignon
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