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Old 10-29-2006, 08:57 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by philso
andy m. - what with you being a mod and having so many posts, etc. i'm a little leary of saying this, but do you actually do this? how does it come out?
popping the bottom crust into a hot oven for a few minutes will melt all the shortening, after which you're going to pull it out of the oven and let it cool again. and then attach the top crust to a partially baked bottom? how many is a few minutes. the crust by itself would be completely cooked in between 10 - 15 depending on how hot of an oven you're talking about. if you've done this and the results are good, then someday i may give it a shot with say a pumpkin pie...
What Andy suggested is called Blind Baking and is a valid and frequently used technique for preparing crusts for cream pies, or setting a graham cracker crust before adding the filling, or a host of other pies that require a pre-cooked crust before the filling is added.

If your raw crust is made properly, the flour starches will set before the shortening has a chance to melt and the crust will retain the proper shape. If the sides fall in, then you have too much shortening in your crust.

On other thing, when blind baking your crusts, you must either use some sort of weight to keep the crust bottom from bubbling (pie beads, dried beans, etc.), or perforate the crust every few inches with a fork to allow steam and hot air to escape.

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Old 10-29-2006, 11:15 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by philso
andy m. - what with you being a mod and having so many posts, etc. i'm a little leary of saying this, but do you actually do this? how does it come out?...
What does my position here or the number of posts have to do with this? You can ask me anything about a post I have made. I hardly ever retaliate...

I've used this method once and it worked for me. I got the tip online somewhere kept it on file for future use. I don't usually need it to keep crusts from getting soggy.

BTW, I use both dark and clear glass pie plates.
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Old 10-29-2006, 12:46 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Goodweed of the North
If your raw crust is made properly, the flour starches will set before the shortening has a chance to melt and the crust will retain the proper shape. If the sides fall in, then you have too much shortening in your crust.
A crust made in a way to expressly stay upright during blind baking might be "proper" in that sense ... but it won't be as tender as a truly delicious crust should be! I still vote for "anchoring" the crust on the rim of the pie plate if and when you have to blind bake. That's accomplished by letting it flop over the edge. You can add a fancy fluted edge on top of that flopped-over section and trim the excess once out of the oven.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Goodweed of the North
On other thing, when blind baking your crusts, you must either use some sort of weight to keep the crust bottom from bubbling (pie beads, dried beans, etc.), or perforate the crust every few inches with a fork to allow steam and hot air to escape.
One continues to hear about the beans, but I really have to wonder why this idea hasn't died a natural death: I tried it once and only once, having to throw both the crust and the beans out thereafter. The crust had taken on a nasty bean flavor that would hardly have enhanced the lemon meringue! Perforating works just fine.
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Old 10-29-2006, 01:19 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ayrton
...The crust had taken on a nasty bean flavor that would hardly have enhanced the lemon meringue! Perforating works just fine.
You're supposed to use DRIED beans!
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Old 10-29-2006, 07:52 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChefJune
Philso, I've never seen a two-crusted pumpkin pie!
that's right. if the egg wash works on a bottom crust crust, then i might try it on a two crust pie.

by the way, there is a two-crust pumpkin pie... of sorts. in early colonial cookery, pumpkins were sliced thinly and layered with apple slices in pies. try it some time. it's fairly good.
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Old 10-30-2006, 02:41 AM   #16
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Originally Posted by Andy M.
You're supposed to use DRIED beans!
Ah, Andy, I can only hope you're being facetious. I assure you, they were dried beans as we all know them. Are you picturing me smearing the crust with refritos?!
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Old 10-30-2006, 07:06 AM   #17
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thanks all who answered. I made an apple pie and is still was soggy.
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Old 10-30-2006, 09:09 AM   #18
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I use this pie crust recipe and never have a soggy bottom.
3 cups flour
1/2 lb lard
1 tsp. salt
1 egg
1 Tlb. vinegar
5 Tlb. water
Mix your flour and lard until blended, I usually put this in a bowl and use a fork to mix. Will look crumbly.
Mix the egg with the vinegar and water and add to dry mixture.
Mix well and work dough until you can form into a ball.
Chill dough for about 1/2 hr.
This makes enough for 2 double crust.
Roll out between 2 pieces of wax paper that has some flour on the wax paper. Roll into a small circle and then turn dough over and continue rolling out to size you want.
Peel wax paper off slowly and put dough into pie pan. Add your fruit and roll out second crust.
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Old 10-30-2006, 10:14 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kaef156
thanks all who answered. I made an apple pie and is still was soggy.
Kaef, are you expecting the bottom crust to be the same as the top crust? You know that's just not possible, right?

I wonder if you're really talking about "soggy" or if you're just talking about a crust that isn't crunchy and isn't browned and is moist. If so, that's just normal bottom crust in my world.

Soggy, on the other hand, is really wet. I'd still say that if it's wet with really nice juices but otherwise cooked through, it's a matter of taste. Either you like it or you don't, but it's still succesful. My mom makes a blueberries and cream pie to knock your socks off but necessarily, because the cream is added in so it's a fairly wet berry mixture to start with, the bottom crust does become wetter than, say, an apple pie (but what a wet crust it is!!).

To make sure your bottom crust is cooked through, you might want to bake the pie more toward the bottom of the oven.
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Old 10-30-2006, 11:38 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kaef156
thanks all who answered. I made an apple pie and is still was soggy.
Can you post what you did? What apples you used, how much flour you put in with them, that sort of thing? We are really good at troubleshooting a recipe here if we have all the information. We could help to make sure your next pie is more to your liking.

Also, just to reiterate what Ayrton said, the bottom crust of a pie is never going to be flaky like a top crust, that just isn't possible. It can however remain intact through the serving process and be quite solid.

Please post what you did and we will help you out.
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