"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Desserts, Sweets & Cookies & Candy > Cakes & Cupcakes
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 06-15-2006, 03:49 AM   #1
Sous Chef
 
Banana Brain's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 647
Call me crazy, but a cheddar cheesecake?

So I was watching The Secret Life of Cheesecake today, as I amb addicted to the Food Network, and I was watching all about the different types of cheesecake from all around the world. Outside of the US, every country pretty much has its own kind of cheesecake besides cream cheese. The French use their Neufchâtel, the Romans like Ricotta, the Greeks use Mascarpone, etceterra. And I had to wonder: why doesn't anyone use the best cheese in the world, sharp cheddar cheese? Or white cheddar? So I'm going to create a dessert cheesecake made of fine Tillamook cheddar or white cheddar cheeses. Or maybe something cheaper, because I havn't actually ever made a cheesecake and might screw it up. I'm determined to do this, and I'll try and keep you posted. Wish me luch and that it doesn't end up tasting like I spilled my candy and soda in my nacho cheese at the movies.

__________________

__________________
Noncooks think it's silly to invest two hours' work in two minutes' enjoyment; but if cooking is evanescent, so is the ballet. -Julia Child
Banana Brain is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-2006, 05:49 AM   #2
Executive Chef
 
marmalady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: USA,SouthCarolina
Posts: 2,642
Go for it - but note that all the dessert cheesecakes are made with a mild tasting cheese that provides a palate for other flavors. Cheddar is a strong cheese, so it may be a little difficult.
__________________

__________________
marmalady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-2006, 09:15 AM   #3
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,370
Some folks make savory cheesecakes so I see no reason not to try.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-2006, 09:29 AM   #4
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 4,764
Send a message via MSN to urmaniac13 Send a message via Skype™ to urmaniac13
Yes, I would think with cheddar, savoury cheesecake would be better, something in the vain of quiche, however considering the fact that a combination of very piquant aged pecorino and sweet fresh pear is so very delicious, maybe we will be in for a surprise for another winning sweet-savoury combination...
__________________
urmaniac13 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-2006, 12:11 PM   #5
Master Chef
 
Constance's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Southern Illiniois
Posts: 8,175
You and I are on the same wave-length, Licia.

We love cheddar cheese with apple pie. BB, if you want to make this a dessert cheesecake, you might consider using apple pie filling in some way...perhaps as a topping.
Of course your own homemade pie filling would be best, but a good brand of canned filling would also be good. When I use the canned stuff, I like to add a splash of lemon juice in addition to the spices. It seems to give the apples a fresher taste.
__________________
We get by with a little help from our friends
Constance is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-2006, 01:05 PM   #6
Master Chef
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 9,229
The main reason cheddar, colby, and similar cheeses aren't used is texture. If you look at the cheeses that were used on FN, they were all soft, creamy cheeses that blended well with other ingrediants. If you are really serious about making your cheesecake from good cheddar, first, I'd get something better than Tillamook. Second, I would bring a cup of milk or cream up to 170 degrees using a candy thermometer, and using a fine grater, grate another 2 cups of cheese directly into the hot millk or cream, stirring as the cheese is added, until a silky smooth cheese sauce is produced. I would then let that cool and use it, along with egg, , cornstarch, and diced fruit to make the custard for the cheesecake. I might still add cream cheese to add body. But do to the bite of the cheddar, I would omit the sour cream.

This can work, but you will have to think carefully about your technique, and the flavors you use. Good luck and keep us posted.

Also, think of cheeses such as Havarti and Gruyere as they also compliment the flavor of fruit.

Seeeeya; Goodweed of the North
__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- http://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-2006, 02:51 PM   #7
Sous Chef
 
Banana Brain's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 647
Quote:
Originally Posted by urmaniac13
Yes, I would think with cheddar, savoury cheesecake would be better, something in the vain of quiche, however considering the fact that a combination of very piquant aged pecorino and sweet fresh pear is so very delicious, maybe we will be in for a surprise for another winning sweet-savoury combination...
Apple pie? Wouldn't have thought of that.
__________________
Noncooks think it's silly to invest two hours' work in two minutes' enjoyment; but if cooking is evanescent, so is the ballet. -Julia Child
Banana Brain is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-2006, 02:52 PM   #8
Sous Chef
 
Banana Brain's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 647
Quote:
Originally Posted by Goodweed of the North
The main reason cheddar, colby, and similar cheeses aren't used is texture. If you look at the cheeses that were used on FN, they were all soft, creamy cheeses that blended well with other ingrediants. If you are really serious about making your cheesecake from good cheddar, first, I'd get something better than Tillamook. Second, I would bring a cup of milk or cream up to 170 degrees using a candy thermometer, and using a fine grater, grate another 2 cups of cheese directly into the hot millk or cream, stirring as the cheese is added, until a silky smooth cheese sauce is produced. I would then let that cool and use it, along with egg, , cornstarch, and diced fruit to make the custard for the cheesecake. I might still add cream cheese to add body. But do to the bite of the cheddar, I would omit the sour cream.

This can work, but you will have to think carefully about your technique, and the flavors you use. Good luck and keep us posted.

Also, think of cheeses such as Havarti and Gruyere as they also compliment the flavor of fruit.

Seeeeya; Goodweed of the North
Perhaps I could use... Velvetta? It would be creamy.
__________________
Noncooks think it's silly to invest two hours' work in two minutes' enjoyment; but if cooking is evanescent, so is the ballet. -Julia Child
Banana Brain is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-2006, 03:04 PM   #9
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 4,357
Interesting concept, Banana. Don't know how cheddar would fare with eggs in a cheesecake - but go for it.

As far as cheap, and if you've never made a cheesecake before, go to Kraft, is one suggestion. There are many no bake cheesecake recipes out there, many requiring only creamed cheese. My experience with cheesecake has always been with a creamy cheese - never cheddar. Let us know how it turns out.
__________________
mish is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-18-2006, 03:21 AM   #10
Sous Chef
 
Banana Brain's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 647
I'm thinking of abandoning plan cheddar cheesecake. Since, ya know, I've never made a traditional cheesecake of any sort? If it turned out crappy, I wouldn't know if it was me or the cheese. And I'm known for screwing desserts up that I don't know. Just ask my first three keylime pies and first crem brulee. I still have yet to make them right.
__________________

__________________
Noncooks think it's silly to invest two hours' work in two minutes' enjoyment; but if cooking is evanescent, so is the ballet. -Julia Child
Banana Brain is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:11 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.