"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Desserts, Sweets & Cookies & Candy > Cakes & Cupcakes
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 11-16-2011, 11:49 PM   #1
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 9
Question Can I replace whipping cream for the heavy cream?

I am want to make chocolate frosting but in the recipe I need to have heavy cream . Bur in my supermarket don't have that . they just have whipping cream . Can I replace it with whipping cream ? Please help me . Thanks .

__________________

__________________
morningstar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-16-2011, 11:52 PM   #2
Executive Chef
 
Sir_Loin_of_Beef's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Sir Francis Drake Hotel
Posts: 4,887
Yes.
__________________

__________________
Life is much more manageable when thought of as a scavenger hunt as opposed to a surprise party - Jimmy Buffett
Sir_Loin_of_Beef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-17-2011, 12:37 AM   #3
Sous Chef
 
Skittle68's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Duluth, MN
Posts: 985
Heavy cream is whipping cream :) also known as heavy whipping cream
__________________
Skittle68 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-17-2011, 12:55 AM   #4
Sous Chef
 
no mayonnaise's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 553
Heavy cream = heavy whipping cream = whipping cream

They all contain roughly 36% or more fat content.

Quote:
[Code of Federal Regulations] [Title 21, Volume 2] [Revised as of April 1, 2011] [CITE: 21CFR131.150]


TITLE 21--FOOD AND DRUGS CHAPTER I--FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES SUBCHAPTER B--FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION PART 131 -- MILK AND CREAM
Subpart B--Requirements for Specific Standardized Milk and Cream
Sec. 131.150 Heavy cream. (a)Description. Heavy cream is cream which contains not less than 36 percent milkfat. It is pasteurized or ultra-pasteurized, and may be homogenized.
(b)Optional ingredients. The following safe and suitable optional ingredients may be used:
(1) Emulsifiers.
(2) Stabilizers.
(3) Nutritive sweeteners.
(4) Characterizing flavoring ingredients (with or without coloring) as follows:
(i) Fruit and fruit juice (including concentrated fruit and fruit juice).
(ii) Natural and artificial food flavoring.
(c)Methods of analysis. The milkfat content is determined by the method prescribed in "Official Methods of Analysis of the Association of Official Analytical Chemists," 13th Ed. (1980), sections 16.156 and 16.059, under "Fat, Roese-Gottlieb Method--Official Final Action," which is incorporated by reference. Copies may be obtained from the AOAC INTERNATIONAL, 481 North Frederick Ave., suite 500, Gaithersburg, MD 20877, or may be examined at the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). For information on the availability of this material at NARA, call 202-741-6030, or go to:http://www.archives.gov/federal_regi...locations.html.
(d)Nomenclature. (1) The name of the food is "Heavy cream" or alternatively "Heavy whipping cream". The name of the food shall be accompanied on the label by a declaration indicating the presence of any characterizing flavoring, as specified in 101.22 of this chapter. The following terms shall accompany the name of the food wherever it appears on the principal display panel or panels of the label in letters not less than one-half the height of the letters used in such name:
(i) The word "ultra-pasteurized" if the food has been ultra-pasteurized.
(ii) The word "sweetened" if no characterizing flavoring ingredients are used, but nutritive sweetener is added.
(2) The following terms may appear on the label:
(i) The word "pasteurized" if the food has been pasteurized.
(ii) The word "homogenized" if the food has been homogenized.
(e)Label declaration. Each of the ingredients used in the food shall be declared on the label as required by the applicable sections of parts 101 and 130 of this chapter.
[42 FR 14360, Mar. 15, 1977, as amended at 47 FR 11824, Mar. 19, 1982; 49 FR 10092, Mar. 19, 1984; 54 FR 24893, June 12, 1989; 58 FR 2891, Jan. 6, 1993]
__________________
no mayonnaise is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-17-2011, 12:59 AM   #5
Sous Chef
 
Skittle68's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Duluth, MN
Posts: 985
And a side note, whipping cream turns into WHIPPED cream. I hate it when people call whipped cream whipping cream. Almost as much as a hate it when people say "un-thaw" :/
__________________
Skittle68 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-17-2011, 10:45 AM   #6
Executive Chef
 
bakechef's Avatar
Site Moderator
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 4,084
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skittle68 View Post
And a side note, whipping cream turns into WHIPPED cream. I hate it when people call whipped cream whipping cream. Almost as much as a hate it when people say "un-thaw" :/
I feel a little less crazy now that I have met someone like me. One that truly drives me bonkers is "I could care less"

My mother and most of my family say "unthaw"
__________________
I'm Bloggin'

http://bakingbetter.com
bakechef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-17-2011, 10:47 AM   #7
Executive Chef
 
bakechef's Avatar
Site Moderator
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 4,084
Quote:
Originally Posted by morningstar View Post
I am want to make chocolate frosting but in the recipe I need to have heavy cream . Bur in my supermarket don't have that . they just have whipping cream . Can I replace it with whipping cream ? Please help me . Thanks .
I've seen "heavy cream" and "whipping cream" in the store and they can be used pretty much interchangeably. Heavy cream has just a bit more fat, but that is about the only difference.

Now my store carries "whipping cream" and "heavy whipping cream" to add to the confusion.
__________________
I'm Bloggin'

http://bakingbetter.com
bakechef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-17-2011, 10:51 AM   #8
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Posts: 18,888
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skittle68 View Post
And a side note, whipping cream turns into WHIPPED cream. I hate it when people call whipped cream whipping cream. Almost as much as a hate it when people say "un-thaw" :/
Unthaw must mean when you stick food back in the freezer after it has "unfrozen".
__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-17-2011, 10:57 AM   #9
Master Chef
 
jennyema's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Boston
Posts: 9,272
Quote:
Originally Posted by bakechef View Post
I've seen "heavy cream" and "whipping cream" in the store and they can be used pretty much interchangeably. Heavy cream has just a bit more fat, but that is about the only difference.

Now my store carries "whipping cream" and "heavy whipping cream" to add to the confusion.

This is true.

Heavy cream and whipping cream are not always the same thing. And you're right, they can be used interchangeably and the only difference is the fat content.

If it's labeled "whipping cream" its usually light whipping cream which contains 30-36% fat. If it's labeled "heavy cream" or "heavy whipping cream" it has to have at least 36% fat.
__________________
Less is not more. More is more and more is fabulous.
jennyema is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-17-2011, 11:07 AM   #10
Cook
 
Al Pine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Aurora, Colorado
Posts: 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by bakechef View Post
I feel a little less crazy now that I have met someone like me. One that truly drives me bonkers is "I could care less"

My mother and most of my family say "unthaw"
Just curious....do these people also say that they are "unsleeping"
during the day?

And are they "unfasting" when they are eating?

And maybe they are "unwalking" when they are sitting down.

People are crazy. Fortunately I never make mistakes.......except
for when I'm awake.
__________________

__________________
Al Pine is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
cream

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:13 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.