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Old 04-21-2011, 07:08 PM   #11
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I think I would plan to be out of town on the big night!

I would also think about only making one cake. Round it out with some very nice berries and whipped cream.
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Old 04-21-2011, 07:14 PM   #12
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I hate hate when I have episodes like that in the kitchen ... and the more in a hurry I get trying to fix one disaster the quicker another one pops up. I'm surprised the paint hasn't peeled off the cupboards with the language I've been known to use in my kitchen.

But, there's a reason you did a test run! All the bugs have presented themselves so you know how to prevent them for the real deal. Best of luck to ya. =)
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Old 04-21-2011, 07:29 PM   #13
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Janet, I feel your pain. I've noted all your "disasters" and will set out to find the solution.

Did I tell you about the lemon wedding cake that I made over and over? One batch called for 2 cups of lemon juice (must be fresh) and the four tiers required about 15 batches.....successful ones. I swear I squeezed about 7 trees worth of lemons and ended up ditching the bottom tier as it just would not cook evenly. The fourth tier as actually an add-on after my quote and since the groom's family were very dear friends and I was helping them out, I didn't bother charging them and I figured out that as far as serving quantity went, it wasn't needed. Well, the cake was done, one of my best decorating jobs I had done and on the way to the venue my husband to a corner too tight and knocked over the top of the cake. I had to redo the fondant on this and redecorate both top tiers. Then a week later the bride informs me that she was unhappy with the cake, that several people said it was dry (I would have believed it if they had said undercooked). So, I gave her the money back.

We will get this one fixed up in no time. Let us know how the prototype went over tonight!
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Old 04-21-2011, 07:44 PM   #14
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A 10" cake is actually 23.45% larger than a 9" cake of the same thickness.

The original recipe, which is for three 9" layers, says it serves 12 to 14; if you were to increase the batter sufficiently to make three 10" layers of the same thickness as the 9" layers, you could get about 15 to 17 servings.
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Old 04-21-2011, 07:59 PM   #15
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Scotch, your figures are correct; however, I was basing my calculations on the fact I have been making cakes for years and a dense and tall cake like this people will eat a smaller piece of.
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Old 04-21-2011, 08:06 PM   #16
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And at a dinner party of 20, some, perhaps several, will decline dessert.

The fools!
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Old 04-21-2011, 09:25 PM   #17
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Janet H, what a hilarious account! Fit for an "I Love Lucy" episode! You have a real talent!
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Old 04-21-2011, 10:27 PM   #18
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Ah...another Alumni of the Wile E. Coyote School of Cake Making! There are not many of us who graduate!

So sorry, Janet! But, by rights...Murphy should have moved on by now. Hugs!!
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Old 04-22-2011, 12:21 AM   #19
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Now for the tasting report:

12 folks tasted and the comments ranged from oh yum to pass the bin please...

My personal take on this cake is that the cake is a very dry and the flavors are very intense, the buttercream is tooo much and overall I don't like it. Sad, becuse I generally LOVE cake. The clove, cinnamon and nutmeg are very present and with the nuts it's a bit like a chocolate flavored fruitcake... but without the fruit. it's waay to sweet.

I am seriously thinking of changing gears on this and making the same cake but instead of chocolate butter cream making a prune/dried cherry/lemon-y puree to go inside. It would add moisture and some relief from the sweet. Any suggestions at this point are welcome...
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Old 04-22-2011, 01:40 AM   #20
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Janet, I am glad you love cake because I love your cake experiences!

What I would try is rehydrating some chopped prunes, apricots, cherries, etc. in a warm water/sherry or brandy (if you like) mixture over a low heat. Just let the fruit soften but not break apart. mix some cornstarch in lemon juice, add some of the warm fruit liquid and then add all to the pot. Stir until thick. You can add some lemon zest as well to heighten the flavours of the fruit. If it is too thick once the starch is cooked in, add a bit more water. If it is too thin, add a very small amount of starch.

Also, when your cakes come out of the oven, poke tiny holes in them with a skewer or fork and spread warmed apricot jam over them. This will help to moisten them and add a layer of flavour. Don't leave a thick layer of jam over the top, just spread it into the cake.
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