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Old 01-26-2010, 04:46 PM   #11
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I ususally cook really big chuck roasts, for sure over 15 pounds, as beeg as 20. I cook at a low temps, but i cook for good 6-8 hours. Beef is no pork it is tough, needs special attention.
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Old 01-26-2010, 08:14 PM   #12
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Just curious, what did you use for your braising liquid?
As soon as I read your question, a light came on. I don't really add any liquid, so it cannot truly be a "braise". I normally add some liquid smoke but not enough to constitute a braising liquid. I didn't this time because I was out.

After reading all the comments, I'm more puzzled as to why the pork roasts work than why the beef roast did not. I addition to the difference in the meat, this was the first boneless roast I've made. It didn't turn out dry and overcooked like you might expect. It's like the collagen and connective tissue just didn't soften, which is probably due to the fact that it cooked in about half the time of my pork roasts. Why? I'm not sure.

Next time I do a beef roast, I'll actually need to look up specifically how to prepare it.

Thanks all!
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Old 01-26-2010, 09:10 PM   #13
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Pork cooks sooo much faster. I don't mean reaches certain temp fast, I mean actually cooks, becomes soft.

I do like beef, unless it is a really good cut, unless it is cooked absolutely perfect beef just do not taste good.
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Old 01-26-2010, 10:28 PM   #14
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Jet:

If you cook a boneless chuck roast you must:

Brown it in a pan over high heat, add aromatic veggies and a flavorful liquid or liquids, cover the pot and simmer for several hours until the internal temperature reaches 190F - 205F.

If you skip the liquids, you're sunk.

If you want a medium rare roast beef, buy a different cut, cook it uncovered in a hotter oven to a much lower internal temperature (120F-150F). Look for Tenderloin, rib roasts, Top sirloin or sirloin tip. Chuck cuts are for braises.
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Old 01-29-2010, 09:20 AM   #15
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As soon as I read your question, a light came on. I don't really add any liquid, so it cannot truly be a "braise". I normally add some liquid smoke but not enough to constitute a braising liquid. I didn't this time because I was out.

After reading all the comments, I'm more puzzled as to why the pork roasts work than why the beef roast did not. I addition to the difference in the meat, this was the first boneless roast I've made. It didn't turn out dry and overcooked like you might expect. It's like the collagen and connective tissue just didn't soften, which is probably due to the fact that it cooked in about half the time of my pork roasts. Why? I'm not sure.

Next time I do a beef roast, I'll actually need to look up specifically how to prepare it.

Thanks all!
So you dry roasted a Chuck roast? NOT a good idea. Chuck roasts need to be braised, not roasted. If you want to roast beef you need to use a cut designed for roasting, say a sirloin tip, or a rolled roast. Chuck roast (pot roast) dry roasted to an internal temp of 190 would be extremely tough.
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Old 01-29-2010, 10:27 AM   #16
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Thanks Alix, now how to get to thread?
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Old 01-29-2010, 10:32 AM   #17
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Thanks Alix, now how to get to thread?
Click on Beef Forum, and it should be there. Or click on link below.

For those of you who are confused I moved Grampyjoe's question here.
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Old 02-09-2010, 09:29 PM   #18
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I tried it again last weekend, using a more proper braising technique, and the results were much better.

Thanks all!
Beef Roast-Take Two
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Old 03-02-2010, 12:59 AM   #19
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You might enjoy the way I prepared my chuck roast tonight...a many-times-used recipe. The liquids used to cook it are what's left in the canned tomatoes after draining, beef broth, and stout (I've also used porter) beer. If you want to check it out, here is the link: Beer-Braised Pot Roast - Country Living
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Old 03-29-2010, 01:41 PM   #20
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Over the weekend I did my first beef roast. I've done pork shoulders before, and did the beef boneless chuck roast the same way (which may have been my first mistake).

I applied a dry rub and braised the roast, covered, at 250deg F until it reached an internal temp of 190deg F. I removed the roast to a platter to rest and de-fatted the drippings. The first thing I noticed was how watery the drippings were. From a pork roast, they have a thick, jelly-like consistency. The beef drippings were like water, but I wrote that off to a difference between the animals. I knew something was definitely wrong when I started trying to slice the roast. The best word I can use to describe the finished product is "chewy", very chewy.

I'm thinking about trying a different cut or a lower oven temp. Is 190deg F too high? Any ideas?

TIA
Chuck roasts are better for braising than dry roasting. I would have put it in a roasting pan with a mirepoix, add potatoes.. leeks and slow cook it until the meat is falling apart tender.
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