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Old 09-27-2005, 08:45 AM   #11
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Like AllenMI mentioned, you answered your own question. It just needs to cook a little longer. You mentioned that you were happy with the crust that formed, so you don't need to sear it any more than when you already have. that part is working for you. Instead of 5 minutes in the oven, try 7 or 8.

What kind of pan are you cooking these in? Cast iron is a favorite when cooking steaks because they hold onto the heat so well. If you are using cast iron then you could even modify your technique a little bit if you wanted. Sear the first side as you have been doing, then flip the steak onto the second side and place right in the oven. There will be enough heat left in the pan to sear that second side and form a nice crust without having it on the stove top.

Even if you don't do that, you probably do not need to flip the meat that third time. Just sear on side on, flip, sear on side two, put in oven. The way you did it won't hurt anything as far as I know, but it is just not necessary.
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Old 09-27-2005, 09:29 AM   #12
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Good advice as always.The only things I'll add,make sure the steaks have come upto room temperature and that includes
the interior of the steak.Also you want to crank the oven as hot as it will go,500 if you can.And by all means use a themometer with it resting very close to the bone,but not touching,about 1/2" away.You might want to leave the pepper
off the steak at the beginning,it only burns and goes bitter,pepper after or very close to the end.
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Old 09-27-2005, 09:31 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by foodaholic
The only things I'll add,make sure the steaks have come upto room temperature and that includes
the interior of the steak.
Very good advice, especially with the thickness of your steak! Let it sit on the counter for at least half an hour before cooking.
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Old 09-27-2005, 10:44 AM   #14
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Exactly what you said in your first post.

The oven absolutely needs to be hotter. 450 is good. Open windows!

The sear and blast (hot oven) method is pretty foolproof, once you get the hang of it.

The length of time you leave it on the oven depends on how done you want it. Use a meat thermometer but also press your finger or thumb on the meat so that you develop a good sense of how pliable (soft) the meat feels at different degrees of doneness.
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Old 09-27-2005, 05:59 PM   #15
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Yeap it's a cast-iron skillet...I'll make sure to crank up that oven temperature and bring the steak fully up to room temperature. I think I may have only let my steak sit outside for around 10-15 minutes because I was eager to eat hahah.

Thanks for the tips everyone...I think I'll do it right this time, and I'll be purchasing a thermometer soon.
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Old 09-28-2005, 06:53 AM   #16
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The advice about letting it come up to room temp is very pertinent, especially for a steak as thick as you are using. In 15 minutes, the center is still fully referigerated. I'd be inclined to let it sit for a full hour before cooking. I can't give much other advice about the pan fry to oven method, as I almost always grill my steaks completely on my Weber gas grill. It has excellent heat control, and I can sear the steak and finish it complete. I also never try to go beyond medium rare, but on a thick steak, using a thermometer is also a great idea until you get enough practice to know how long it takes. One more thing, go easy with the salt, as salting meat before cooking can have a tendency to make it dry out.

Good luck... nothing much beats a properly cooked steak.
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Old 09-28-2005, 07:06 AM   #17
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That's the beauty of cast iron skillets. I love the ability to pop them into the oven, then after it's done, remove the item, and make a sauce from the pan drippings. Due to the time and temperatures used for this huge steak (I'm drooling!), the drippings might be burned, but if they aren't, I'd be itching to hit the pan with a little brandy or cognac, and once the flames die down, a little demi-glace and dijon mustard.
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Old 09-28-2005, 11:15 AM   #18
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You know, I'm wondering what the point of the olive oil is?? Seems to me that would cause undue smoking, and you would'nt be able to taste it once the food was done cooking, not to mention that would cause the crust to form too quickly, making the meat still raw on the inside???

What I do is buy thinner steaks!!!, no really, I would use the cast iron, or I use a SS pan, personally for this stuff, but heat it over med mid-hi heat until droplets of water dance on the surface, then add my seasoned steaks to the dry pan. If the pan is hot enough when you add your steaks, they will release themselves once they are done caramelizing. Turn them over. Then you can place in the oven, or reduce the heat on the stovetop to about medium, and cook until they are done. This way, you have the, what does emeril call them, goonies, goodies, goombies... in the bottom of the pan, and you can make your pan sauce.
I do the same w/ pork tenderloin, but after I sear the outside, I place it in a hot over, say 425 for 15 minutes.
BTW, did you know that the larger part of the T-Bone is the NY Steak, and the smaller portion is the filet mignon, depends on how the butcher cuts that section of the cow??
My favorite way to cook a NY steak is by coating it w/ crushed pepper and cooking as above. The pepper doesn't get bitter for me, only makes the steak better.
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Old 09-28-2005, 11:25 AM   #19
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Let me see if I can explain this through words.

Make a fist with your left hand be sure your thumb is overlapping your fingers and not tucked inside your palm and fingers.

Ok......make a TIGHT FIST with your left hand and take your index finger on you right hand ..... with the tip of that finger touch the area on your left hand ..... that web of skin between your index finger and thumb = Meat is well done.

Ok.....loosen your fist just a bit = Meat is medium rare.

Ok.....relax the fist = Meat is rare.

I only use this technique on my steaks. With time you'll learn pretty much how long it takes to get your steaks the way you like them. However, I've been cooking steaks for quite some time and still have a tendancy to overcook mine at times or not cook DH long enough.
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Old 09-28-2005, 06:53 PM   #20
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All I can say once again is thanks to all :D
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