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Old 03-17-2010, 04:17 PM   #11
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that's the best reason ever , FrankZ.......my hubby makes or does stuff for me, too, he hates,...you are a great partner.......obviously........
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Old 03-18-2010, 07:16 PM   #12
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Well ... he soaked it for about 2 hours in warm water, changing the water every 30 minutes or so, to try to pull out some of the salt. He put it on foil and indirect grilled it for about 1 1/2 hours. I know technically we have pastrami but it was still very good.
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Old 03-15-2011, 12:23 PM   #13
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Grilled Corned Beef Brisket

Hello to All!

First time posting and couldn't pass up the Corned Beef Brisket Grilled discussion.

I have been grilling my corned beef for many years, and it has come to a yearly tradition of many friends and family waiting and talking all year about this day.

I hated the way my mother use to cook the corned beef in water, that I think steals most of the flavors.

I don't soak in water to remove the salt, I don't add any new spices but the ones that came in the package. I always buy the flat that is approx. 8 - 12 lbs. The point is removed. I try to find some that has less fat but not all lean, because remember, the fat keeps the meat moist and the flavors alive.

I lay out 12 sheets of heavy duty foil, take two sheets, long enough to wrap the beef, and panel them together. Put two pieces of foil length wise, not the part that was ripped, on top of each other and do a small fold on the length wise edge, about three time so the pieces when open stay together and form a panel. Do until you have a total of 6 panels. Open these up and lay three panels on top of each other. Place your corned beef on top and wrap tightly. There will be part of the corned beef that is exposed. You will do the same with the rest of the panels of foil, turn the exposed side down on top of the last three sheets of foil and wrap it up again, this time laying it crosswise to cover. It will seem like a lot of foil but as you will find out it is just enough.


Heat up enough charcoal to last three hours, and raise the rack to the highest part of the grill. I usually cook three briskets at a time.


Cook, flipping every 1/2 hour for 3 hours. In the last 1/2 hour, remove and open up the foil and poke with a fork, be careful for the juices will be overwhelming, drain the juice into a pot and use this to cook your potatoes and cabbage. If the corn beef is not yet fork tender then cook a bit longer. (You will noticed that the foil is becoming larger than the brisket, this is why you have to tightly wrap in the beginning. It forms a cooking pocket full of steams and spices.) Yum!

I let it rest for 15 minutes in the foil and slice away..

Never had a complaint! It may seem like a bit of a fuss, but why spend the money on a delicious piece of meat if you are just going to boil away all the flavors. (I don't soak to remove the salt, but if you are salt sensitive then you might want to consider it, although I don't ever remember mine being salty) PS: make enough, even though I make approximately 45 lbs, I barely have enough left to make sandwiches the next day..


Happy St. Patrick's Day!
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Old 03-15-2011, 12:58 PM   #14
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Hi SR64. Welcome to DC.

I have to say you are not grilling corned beef. Tightly wrapped in foil and simmering in its own juices is braising. Your grill simply is providing a heat source. However, I'll bet it tastes good.
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Old 03-15-2011, 01:19 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
Hi SR64. Welcome to DC.

I have to say you are not grilling corned beef. Tightly wrapped in foil and simmering in its own juices is braising. Your grill simply is providing a heat source. However, I'll bet it tastes good.
I see what you're saying, but most food cooked on a grill outside is thought of as grilled, whether it touches the grates or not. You need to think of grilling as a verb and not a method
I knew a family that used to cook hamburgers in a foil pan, on the grill, and poke holes in the foil when they were just about done. It produced a good burger from what I remember. And saved them from cleaning the grates now that I am thinking about it again Technically they were basically fried hamburgers, but I would consider them more "grilled" than a hamburger cooked stovetop on a grill pan
I am going to grill a hamburger...
I am going to cook a grilled hamburger...
I am going to grill a brisket...
I am going to braise a brisket on the grill...

Oh shoot, I just got myself all confused



BTW, a corned beef brisket just went on my shopping list this morning. I'm not sure how I am going to cook it yet, since I don't like corned beef unless it is buried in a Reuben. I might just smoke it if that's all it takes to make pastrami. I can never get pastrami around here.
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Old 03-15-2011, 01:34 PM   #16
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Oh, how funny! From beginning to end. I bought mine and started it today. I like both cuts, and they shrink so much that we can always use more! and there are only two of us.

I actually buy extra pickling spices (by the way, corning is basically a pickling process) and spend the first afternoon stewing the meat in the spices, an onion or three, garlic cloves. This evening I'll pull out the meat, strain the broth, and refrigerate both. De-fat the stock Thursday morning, then meat and carrots, onions, potatoes, etc into the stock again. I use the fattier cut to make a soup which is really my husband's favorite, and my two older ladies love it. The flat brisket I de-fat, slice as thin as I can, and freeze for use in Ruebens. I tend to go low on the cabbage, because it can be overwhelming. Sometimes I don't put it in at all, using a can of saurkraut to make the soup what I call "Rueben soup" served with rye bread and Swiss cheese!
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Old 03-15-2011, 01:42 PM   #17
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pacanis, a grill is nothing more than a heat source. If you put a covered pot of water on a grill, are you grilling water or boiling it?

You can boil, braise, stew, steam, smoke and grill on a grill. With the lid down, a grill acts as an oven so you can roast on a grill too.

You can 'grill' a burger on a gas burner (but that would make a mess).
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Old 03-15-2011, 02:10 PM   #18
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My post was a little tongue in cheek, but you are right, Andy, it is a heat source, but it is also a verb. To "grill" something is to cook it on a grill, regardless if you are wrapping it in foil or placing directly on the grate. And that grill is generally accepted as being outside. I wouldn't expect to open a thread titled "Grilled Chicken Wings" and see a picture of some wings sizzling away on someone's George Foreman grill setting on their kitchen counter, but "technically" they would be correct. It's all in what is commonly perceived.
If someone tells me they grilled a brisket, I'll know where they cooked it. We can get into the specific grilling method after that.

Now don't make me change my dinner thread today and say I'll be baking my ribs in the outdoor oven
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Old 03-15-2011, 02:36 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by pacanis View Post
My post was a little tongue in cheek, but you are right, Andy, it is a heat source, but it is also a verb. To "grill" something is to cook it on a grill, regardless if you are wrapping it in foil or placing directly on the grate....

This is where I don't agree. To me, grilling is a cooking method beyond the heat source used.
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Old 03-15-2011, 02:57 PM   #20
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Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
This is where I don't agree. To me, grilling is a cooking method beyond the heat source used.
That's cool To me grilling is multi dimensional.
Either way, I think I'll end up smoking that corned beef that I get.
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