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Old 06-07-2015, 05:59 AM   #1
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ISO Favorite way to cook flat iron steak

This is a cut of beef I've never cooked (or eaten). From what I've read, it tends to be tough and should be marinated. Wondering how DCers cook/treat a flat iron steak? I don't want the result to be tough.
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Old 06-07-2015, 10:33 AM   #2
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I've had a couple. And I also read up on them quite a bit. I don't think you should expect a whole lot... It was ok....the flavor was good, not very tender. I marinated mine in some tex mex style seasonings with a bit of beer and mustard...you could marinate in whatever you please, I suppose...I did it on a very hot grill over coals from a camp fire...cooked it to med-rare....It was with a few people at a pot luck, so we all just had a few pieces. I wouldn't buy it again, but it was interesting to try..
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Old 06-07-2015, 10:40 AM   #3
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Around here that cut is not trimmed to remove the gristle. It's sliced across the grain to produce small steaks with a line of gristle through the length. They are called blade steaks. I've grilled them and don't care for the flavor.
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Old 06-07-2015, 02:37 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
Around here that cut is not trimmed to remove the gristle. It's sliced across the grain to produce small steaks with a line of gristle through the length. They are called blade steaks. I've grilled them and don't care for the flavor.
When I see something here in Quebec, called "blade steak", it usually looks something like this:



I prefer the thicker "blade roast" that looks the same. I use it for pot roast.
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Old 06-07-2015, 03:35 PM   #5
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oh my. what differences!

I always keep a flat iron on hand - typically frozen.
I do not find them tough.
I do find them ultra-flavorful.
they don't look anything like the "blade steaks" in the pix.

thoroughly thaw or fresh; on a plate, bring to room temp, salt the plate, salt the top, allow to stand 2-3 hours.
pre-heat oven to 235'F
sear a nice crust in a hot heavy pan, flip once.
into the oven 10-20 minutes depending on degree of doneness desired.

for me, I like rare:

DW prefers more well done.

thin sliced across the grain, on the bias.
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Old 06-07-2015, 07:23 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
Around here that cut is not trimmed to remove the gristle. It's sliced across the grain to produce small steaks with a line of gristle through the length. They are called blade steaks. I've grilled them and don't care for the flavor.

I have seen and bought this one. It is a tough piece of meat. I have always cut it up for stew meat. By doing that I can remove the gristle easily. Like most stew meat it does soften up when braised. I buy the smallest piece I can find. Less gristle.
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Old 06-07-2015, 08:03 PM   #7
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I slice it thin and use it in stir frys.
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Old 06-08-2015, 09:31 AM   #8
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Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
Around here that cut is not trimmed to remove the gristle. It's sliced across the grain to produce small steaks with a line of gristle through the length. They are called blade steaks. I've grilled them and don't care for the flavor.
This steak was described to me as the 2nd most tender cut on the carcass. I've dry fried them in a hot CI pan, grilled them, and broiled them, all with great results. But you do have to look for good marbling, and when serving then, cut out the center gristle. And seasoning is important as well. The steaks I've made have always come out tender, once the gristle is cut away. I love this steak, whether it's called a flat iron, or blade steak, or little sizzler.

But I can understand that aren't crazy about the flavor. We all have different tastes. And what's good to me, might not be for you, and vice versa. It's all good. And I know that your prep and technique had to be good. After all, you are Andy M., one of our premier steak cookers on DC.

Go get yourself a good rib steak and call it a day.

Seeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 06-08-2015, 09:58 AM   #9
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...But I can understand that aren't crazy about the flavor. We all have different tastes. And what's good to me, might not be for you, and vice versa. It's all good. And I know that your prep and technique had to be good. After all, you are Andy M., one of our premier steak cookers on DC.

Go get yourself a good rib steak and call it a day.

Seeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
Thanks, Chief. Sounds like a plan.
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Old 06-09-2015, 08:28 PM   #10
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On Tuesday 09/06/2015 at 6:11 pm, Capital Writing Services wrote:
I bought a "chunk" (.06 kg) of this the local butcher. He cleaned it for me so the gristle/connective tissue is removed. He also showed me on the picture of the cuts of a side of beef where it is. Because it comes from the top part of the front leg, it can be tough. It is nicely marbled. The three butchers I called to learn more about this cut all concurred that it needs to be cooked on this side of medium-rare. Once it is moving to medium or well-done, it will be as tough as shoe leather (or, as one butcher said, you better have really strong teeth).

I found out why I've never gotten it when I've gotten a side or whole steer--it is usually tossed in to be ground. I also didn't know that this cut existed until this winter when it came up here.

I had to buy more than eight ounces. I am going do a test and cook a piece to medium rare (for the photoshoot), cook two smaller pieces to medium and well done. This was local, grass-fed beef. The chunk is 0.6 kg and was under $17. So it isn't an expensive cut, just one that doesn't take kindly to being overcooked.

Two butchers said they sear it on each side for 2 minutes and then pop it a 275 oven for 30 minutes (that is using the whole piece). I am going to do both-cook it in a screaming hot grill pan and sear it 2 minutes each side and finish in a 275F oven. might want to try both methods--the one in the recipe and the one the two out of three butchers use. I'ld still do the "how tough does it get" test with what isn't used for the photo.

Now I know what a flat iron steak is and why it is called that (once the gristle is removed, the two pieces are flat). The gristle in the piece I bought was about 1/8-3/16 " thick.

Tomorrow will be the test. I'll see how it turns out.

Thanks everyone for your input. I have a better sense of the cut of meat I will be cooking and what to expect.

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