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Old 12-13-2011, 11:53 AM   #11
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Heres a good brine recipe

Alton Brown's 2-Hour Mustard Brine For Pork Chops Or Roast Recipe - Food.com - 191816
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Old 12-13-2011, 12:08 PM   #12
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I have an excellent recipe for dragon loin that will also work with pork loin. I guarantee your husband will love it.


Chinese Dragon

Ingredients:
  • 3 to 5 pound boneless dragon loin (you can substitute pork loin , but your guests will know the difference)
  • tsp salt
  • tsp ground pepper
Marinade:
  • cup hoisin sauce
  • cup soy sauce
  • 2 Tbs tomato paste
  • 1 Tbs Chili Garlic sauce
  • 2 Tbs rice vinegar
  • 2 Tbs firmly packed brown sugar
  • 1 Tbs grated ginger
  • 2 tsp five-spice powder
Garnish:
  • 1 small green mango
  • cup crushed pineapple
  • 2 tsp lemon juice
  • 2 Tbs Pineapple vinegar (substitute rice wine vinegar if you can't find pineapple vinegar)
  • tsp crushed red pepper (optional)
  • small red bell pepper, julienned
  • 4 scallions, thinly sliced
  • 1 cup chopped dry roasted unsalted peanuts
Combine hoisin sauce, soy sauce, tomato paste, chili garlic sauce, rice vinegar, brown sugar, ginger, and five-spice in a medium saucepan. Simmer over low heat for 10 minutes. Remove from heat; allow marinade to cool.

Trim excess fat from loin, season with salt and pepper. Then place in a large plastic zip bag. When marinade has cooled, pour into plastic bag, squeeze out any excess air, and zip closed. Allow to marinate for at least 1 hour (preferably overnight), refrigerated.

Preheat oven to 350F. Place the loin on a rack in a shallow roasting pan and cook for 20 to 30 minutes per pound, or until internal temperature is 160F. Allow loin to rest for 10 to 15 minutes, covered with foil, before slicing.

Slice thin and serve topped with garnish.
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Old 12-13-2011, 12:19 PM   #13
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Thank you all for the wonderful suggestions. They give me something to try the next time I brave the kitchen.
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Old 12-13-2011, 01:16 PM   #14
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Pork, like fish, can be tricky to properly cook. There is a very fine line between undercooked and overcooked.

If you're new to cooking, I would suggest getting an instant read meat thermometer. It will help you get things right until you've done it enough to know what you are looking for. Pork tenederloin should be cooked to an internal temperature of 160F. I actually like it around 152-155F (slightly pinkish), but that's me. You'll see a lot of cookbooks that say cook it to 185-190. In my experience, if you do that you'll end up with shoe leather.
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Old 12-13-2011, 07:13 PM   #15
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Actually the USDA recommends that you cook Pork to 145. But I usually cook it to 140 as it can dry out when it is overcooked. Cooking by time is not easy to do, as it depends on the temperature of the meat and the exact temperature of the cooking surface. The best way it to cook by the internal temperature of the meat. A good instant read thermometer, like a Thermapen, is the best way to go.
Amazon.com: Splash-Proof Super-Fast Thermapen (Orange) Instant Read Thermometer, Perfect for Barbecue, Home and Professional Cooking: Kitchen & Dining
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Old 12-13-2011, 10:33 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Al Pine View Post
Actually the USDA recommends that you cook Pork to 145.
Apparently that's a very recent change to their guidelines.
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Old 12-13-2011, 10:37 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Kroll View Post
Apparently that's a very recent change to their guidelines.

Yes, it was earlier this year.
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Old 12-14-2011, 09:13 AM   #18
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I made a really simple brine today that has worked excellent. 1 cup brown sugar 1 cup sea salt and some pepper.
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Old 12-14-2011, 09:16 AM   #19
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[QUOTE=Hot Tamale;1083554]I made a really simple brine today that has worked excellent. 1 cup brown sugar 1 cup sea salt and some pepper.[Pressure is what you feel when you don't know what your doing-Chip Kelly
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Old 12-14-2011, 09:20 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hot Tamale View Post
I made a really simple brine today that has worked excellent. 1 cup brown sugar 1 cup sea salt and some pepper.
How much water?
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