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Old 06-27-2006, 06:08 AM   #51
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Traditionally our fish and chip shops were run by Italians, then came the Indians and Pakistanis - who, as well as serving traditional fish suppers, or haggis or pie suppers, offer you the immortal words 'Ye waaaant curry soss (sauce) wi yer chips, hen?'!!! Sounds like in Dundee, they also have kebabs on offer in the Indian/Pakistani takeaway shops!!
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Old 06-27-2006, 09:26 AM   #52
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Originally Posted by Ishbel
Velochic
Traditionally our fish and chip shops were run by Italians, then came the Indians and Pakistanis - who, as well as serving traditional fish suppers, or haggis or pie suppers, offer you the immortal words 'Ye waaaant curry soss (sauce) wi yer chips, hen?'!!! Sounds like in Dundee, they also have kebabs on offer in the Indian/Pakistani takeaway shops!!
But why, when they make the best curry in the world??

My husband just reminded me of this awesome gyros takeaway that was run by a family from China. There you go. I shouldn't have sterotyped.
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Old 06-27-2006, 09:41 AM   #53
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But the Pakistani shops do have kebabs as part of their food culture, so maybe it wasn't a big step for them to serve them in Greek/Turkish style bread and smear them with Indian curry sauce or Chinese sweetnsour?!!!
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Old 06-27-2006, 10:14 AM   #54
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Good point, because they have naans already. Not much different than pita or pide. I've just never heard of it. I'm probably wrong. I don't have a problem admitting I'm wrong. I was just thinking, "what are the odds of there being a town in Scotland where all the Indian restaurants sells Turkish döner kebap when in the rest of the world the Turks sell it"? I thought she might be confused by term "döner" or "gyros".
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Old 06-27-2006, 10:27 AM   #55
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All over the UK, from London to Cornwall to Edinburgh to wherever, the young men who go out on the bevvy (drinking) always round off the night with either an Indian or Chinese meal or a take-away kebab from a mobile van or a take-away shop....! Most Indian restaurants I know don't sell kebabs as a take-away, but sell the lamb patties as a starter. The eating of kebabs in the street, late at night is a young man's rite of passage sort of thing And there seems to be an urban myth that the kebab soaks up the alcohol!
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Old 06-27-2006, 10:32 AM   #56
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My husband just reminded me of this awesome gyros takeaway that was run by a family from China. There you go. I shouldn't have sterotyped.
It's not about the ingredients that make up the person, but the ingredients that make up the food.

Ciao,
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Old 08-02-2006, 11:15 AM   #57
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Cretan Gyros

I am aching, just having read this thread, for gyros like I remember them. We were not long married (many moons ago) when we went to Crete for an October holiday.

The gyros I remember were little strips of lamb/pork, stuck on large skewers like kebabs and cut off in little slices. These were placed in a small, round, thin pitta bread. They were topped with yoghurt, mint, cucumber, tomato and... chips (very thin american style fries), before being rolled up into a sausage shape. How the milky sauce and grease ran down our hands as we greedily devoured these first tastes of foreign food.

I watch Bourdain's programmes, impressed that he gets the same hit out of eating takeaway/junk food, as much as he does the higher end of the market fare.

Pining for Bouzouki, ouzo and greasy-yoghurty hands.
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Old 08-02-2006, 11:22 AM   #58
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I like Greek gyros, but Turkish ones are my favorite.
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Old 08-06-2006, 09:11 PM   #59
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We get very good Doner Kebabs here, from quite a few outlets. But the meat is definately not 70 fat, that would awful.
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Old 08-24-2006, 03:02 PM   #60
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I saw Gorden Ramsey's "F Word" last week and they had a on feature Donner kababs. In the Donner Kabab factory they make the Donner from Lamb breast and mechanically recovered meat off the bone. The whole lot is then minced to a paste and seasoned with salt, pepper, oregano amougst others and then squashed into patties and compressed on skewer. Apparently it can only contain beef if its titled a Kabab and not a Donner Kabab. (donner is just lamb)

When i was in greece I saw the pork equivilant which a friend described as a pork cornet. Very strange unleven bread wrap with chips (potato fries)

The only true way to eat a donner Kabab as anybody from the UK or like minded nations will know is after 9 pints of stella (Insert other psuedo-imported strong Larger) at 1.00am served in a toasted pitta bread, with mixed salad, pickled chillies and approximatley 1 litre of "Chillie Sauce" which roughly translates to red paint and chille seeds. Alternately Donner meat and chips with chillie sauce is a suitable beer soaking substitue when you feel like slumming it

EDIT: 70% fat proably isn't far off as lamb breast is really mostly fat. I was surprised it was even meat!
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