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Old 01-02-2012, 11:52 AM   #21
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I have a really unique soup question which seems like it might find a perfect answer from all you soup experts! I am a hindu, so I do not eat beef. But I only started following this practice from when I was in high school, before which I used to eat some beef. I didn't really enjoy most beef products much so giving it up was not too difficult. The one food though I really miss though is french onion soup. I understand it is impossible to truly replicate the soup without using beef stock, but does anyone have good tips or options to make a similarly hearty non-beef version?
You could try vegtable broth but I am not sure how that would taste... Maybe start with vegtable and add some of the sherry or wine that others have posted...
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Old 01-02-2012, 03:04 PM   #22
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What is the blog address so we can read it? Thanks!
I Love Soup
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Old 01-02-2012, 03:08 PM   #23
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I have a really unique soup question which seems like it might find a perfect answer from all you soup experts! I am a hindu, so I do not eat beef. But I only started following this practice from when I was in high school, before which I used to eat some beef. I didn't really enjoy most beef products much so giving it up was not too difficult. The one food though I really miss though is french onion soup. I understand it is impossible to truly replicate the soup without using beef stock, but does anyone have good tips or options to make a similarly hearty non-beef version?
Hi Jolokia,

I would like to suggest to try vegetable stock with dry white wine and some soy sauce.
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Old 01-03-2012, 12:36 PM   #24
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Originally Posted by Jolokia View Post
I have a really unique soup question which seems like it might find a perfect answer from all you soup experts! I am a hindu, so I do not eat beef. But I only started following this practice from when I was in high school, before which I used to eat some beef. I didn't really enjoy most beef products much so giving it up was not too difficult. The one food though I really miss though is french onion soup. I understand it is impossible to truly replicate the soup without using beef stock, but does anyone have good tips or options to make a similarly hearty non-beef version?

Actually it really is not that unique. I cannot use beef stock in that soup either. All you have to do is to buy ready made vegetarian "beef" stock. It is available in stores. And there you go, you are on the way to a good soup without having have to brake your religiuos or simply diet adhearance.
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Old 01-03-2012, 12:40 PM   #25
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here is the link to what i am refering to:

http://www.amazon.com/Osem-Flavor-Pa...5612364&sr=8-1
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Old 01-03-2012, 12:54 PM   #26
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I have to laugh. I often think ... soup ... recipe? Recipe for soup? Is there such a thing? Rarely do I make soup from a recipe, I just use whatever is at hand, peasant food, so to speak.

Yeah, my real name is Claire. I think there is room for two claires in DC!

I did pea soup, my recipe such as it is, on another line.

One you might consider is grilling over charcoal, many different vegetables. Onions, for sure, leeks, squash of various kinds, both summer and winter, eggplant. Toss them in olive oil seasoned with some garlic kind of seasoning mix. Grill until browned. Then chop (I usually slice in half vertically before grilling). Then stick in a stock pot and cover with water. After stewing for awhile, you will have a great base for vegetarian soups of all kinds.

From one Claire to another --
I agree with both Claire's. Great soup is so easy to make. But don't scoff at recipes. Sometimes, just every once in a while, you make something that comes out amazing. And with a recipe, you can recreate that amaizing soup, or whatever it is that you made, and share it with others. REstaurants use recipes because it allows them to make the same dish, exactly the same way, and with the same results. It also allows them to hire new employes and know that the product will be the same.

I have a whole list of recipes in my "Soup, Stew, & Chowders" cookbook that allows me to teach others the basics of building a great soup. The recipes also allowed me to try different ideas, and record the recipes that worked, and discard the ones that didn't.

Just as with any work, to be able to record what you've accomplished is an important part of cooking. Can I make chili, or New England boiled Dinner without a recipe? You betcha. But if I want the prize winning white chili from a couple years back, then I'd better follow the recipe I developed to make it. Otherwise, it will taste a bit different every time I make it.

Seeeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 01-03-2012, 05:12 PM   #27
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Thank you Chief Longwind Of The North. Yes, I do agree with you that recipes can be a very big asset. Since I have started my blog (52 soup recipes in 52 weeks), 1.5 month ago, I have received recipes from France, US, The Netherlands & Israel. Quite some recipes were amazing with ingredients which were new to me or more often the combinations were new to me. So yes let us be thankful for recipes as well

ps sorry for my English, it's not perfect yet but do hope you understand what I am trying to say.....


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Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
I agree with both Claire's. Great soup is so easy to make. But don't scoff at recipes. Sometimes, just every once in a while, you make something that comes out amazing. And with a recipe, you can recreate that amaizing soup, or whatever it is that you made, and share it with others. REstaurants use recipes because it allows them to make the same dish, exactly the same way, and with the same results. It also allows them to hire new employes and know that the product will be the same.

I have a whole list of recipes in my "Soup, Stew, & Chowders" cookbook that allows me to teach others the basics of building a great soup. The recipes also allowed me to try different ideas, and record the recipes that worked, and discard the ones that didn't.

Just as with any work, to be able to record what you've accomplished is an important part of cooking. Can I make chili, or New England boiled Dinner without a recipe? You betcha. But if I want the prize winning white chili from a couple years back, then I'd better follow the recipe I developed to make it. Otherwise, it will taste a bit different every time I make it.

Seeeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 01-03-2012, 05:20 PM   #28
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Thank you for sharing! I love Osem

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Old 01-03-2012, 05:41 PM   #29
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I made my take on Dawglover's soup on Saturday. I didn't have edamene or broccoli, but more or less did the same I did otherwise (turkey stock + chicken stock, chopped chicken etc.). That soup is a winner. I'm sure if you followed Dawglover's recipe, it would turn out. I do it by "taste and by golly."

Smoked Turkey Wild Rice Black Bean Soup
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Old 01-03-2012, 05:46 PM   #30
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Another soup--blasphemy--not homemade, is to take a can of clam chowder, add some cooked (or canned) shrimp, canned oysters, frozen white fish, that fake crab, and smoked oysters or mussels (drained), red pepper flakes, splash of sherry or white wine. Add more milk/cream as needed and more cooked cubed potatoes. Garnished with some fresh lemon zest, fresh lemon juice, parsley, butter, pepper, splash of more fresh lemon juice or sherry. I do this at my parents' house to use up the canned clam chowder (the white stuff--must be New England style--they have tons of "red" style as well)--it is a great way to get rid of frozen shrimp, fish, canned fish, etc. And, it is tasty.
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