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Old 01-03-2014, 12:32 PM   #41
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Originally Posted by CraigC View Post
I've been buying fresh and shucking them my self.
I love oysters and sometimes buy fresh ones this time of year.
My problem is opening them.
I do have a shucking knife, but it is still so hard to do.
Every time I buy whole fresh, I always say never again. That going out for them is much easier.
I have watched countless YouTube videos on shucking with little success.
Maybe its the knife? Maybe its the oysters?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Addie View Post
Steve, if you purchase them in the shell, why can't you steam them open and then add them and their liquor to the rest of the stew. You would just have to strain their liquor and the steaming broth through a cheesecloth. Like you do if you are making clam chowder. Sure would be easier than trying to shuck enough of them for the stew.
I like the idea, but I think it might over cook them. I sure could use some help as you can see from my post above.
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Old 01-03-2014, 12:49 PM   #42
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roll_Bones View Post
I love oysters and sometimes buy fresh ones this time of year.
My problem is opening them.
I do have a shucking knife, but it is still so hard to do.
Every time I buy whole fresh, I always say never again. That going out for them is much easier.
I have watched countless YouTube videos on shucking with little success.
Maybe its the knife? Maybe its the oysters?



I like the idea, but I think it might over cook them. I sure could use some help as you can see from my post above.
The secret to steaming crustaceans is to remove them from the heat the second you see the shells open. Then you drain the steaming water through a cheesecloth. Also the liquor from the animals themselves. It only takes five minutes at the most. The smaller the animals, the shorter time required. It helps if you have a glass cover so you can shut the heat off immediately. Don't leave the stove. Stand there and watch them closely. Have your tongs in hand. Have a platter or tray close by so you can put the oysters on them as you remove them from the pan. If you remove them immediately from the pan as soon as you see them starting to open and pour their liquor through the cheesecloth, they will still be half raw. They will finish cooking in the heat of the broth of the chowder and it will be flavored from the liquor and steaming water. Make sure you collect every drop of their liquor, as that their essence of flavor.


Did I make this understandable.?
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Old 01-03-2014, 12:55 PM   #43
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Once you find the right spot at the hinge, it becomes second nature. Towels are as important as the knife. One to set the oyster on and one over the top to hold the oyster and protect your "holding" hand. The "knife" is actually a prying and scraping tool, IMO.
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Old 01-03-2014, 03:00 PM   #44
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I love oyster stew. I've always found pints of shucked Willapointe oysters in the fishy section of the meats counter, or if they have a fish department, I can usually ask and get them.

I got another pint today, (YAY!) and some celery and 2 quarts of half and half.

The Willapointe oysters says on the lid they are extra small, but in my experience there are a few giant oysters inside. No matter, they always taste good. The liquid included is kind of bland, but I will prick or cut up the larger oysters to get a good broth going.

I usually make the base, add the oysters then remove from the heat and put in the fridge overnight to let the oyster flavor get permeated.

The next day, I bring it all up to a simmer until the oysters are frilly then pig out.

Once I've used up the oysters, if I have some base left, I put it in the freezer to add to the next batch. This time, I ran low on food and ate it (YUM). Hopefully I'll have some left this time.
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Old 01-04-2014, 01:20 PM   #45
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Originally Posted by CraigC View Post
Once you find the right spot at the hinge, it becomes second nature. Towels are as important as the knife. One to set the oyster on and one over the top to hold the oyster and protect your "holding" hand. The "knife" is actually a prying and scraping tool, IMO.
I hear you Craig.
It seems it might be the oysters as I sometimes have a very hard time determining the hinge.
When I do find it, I am successful, but it is still hard to do.
I think this is something that requires experience. The more you shuck, the better you get at it.

Also sometimes the oysters in SC are attached to each other. This really complicates the opening.

Are fresh oysters in those plastic containers in liquor? Or should they be drained?
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Old 01-04-2014, 01:23 PM   #46
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Originally Posted by Addie View Post
The secret to steaming crustaceans is to remove them from the heat the second you see the shells open. Then you drain the steaming water through a cheesecloth. Also the liquor from the animals themselves. It only takes five minutes at the most. The smaller the animals, the shorter time required. It helps if you have a glass cover so you can shut the heat off immediately. Don't leave the stove. Stand there and watch them closely. Have your tongs in hand. Have a platter or tray close by so you can put the oysters on them as you remove them from the pan. If you remove them immediately from the pan as soon as you see them starting to open and pour their liquor through the cheesecloth, they will still be half raw. They will finish cooking in the heat of the broth of the chowder and it will be flavored from the liquor and steaming water. Make sure you collect every drop of their liquor, as that their essence of flavor.


Did I make this understandable.?
Yes, Addie. Perfectly understandable. Thank You.
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Old 01-04-2014, 03:56 PM   #47
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Originally Posted by Roll_Bones View Post
Are fresh oysters in those plastic containers in liquor? Or should they be drained?
They are in liquor (or more precisely, oyster juice - not to be confused with booze ).

If you are making the stew recipe at the start of the thread you definitely do not want to toss it out. That's where all the flavor is.

What I usually do is strain the oysters over a bowl, to reserve the liquor. Then I rinse the oysters under cold water and pick through them to remove any bits of shell. Nothing worse than eating creamy soup and biting into a piece of shell.
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Old 01-04-2014, 05:33 PM   #48
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Originally Posted by Roll_Bones View Post
I hear you Craig.
It seems it might be the oysters as I sometimes have a very hard time determining the hinge.
When I do find it, I am successful, but it is still hard to do.
I think this is something that requires experience. The more you shuck, the better you get at it.

Also sometimes the oysters in SC are attached to each other. This really complicates the opening.

Are fresh oysters in those plastic containers in liquor? Or should they be drained?
That liquor is the natural juices of the oyster and have a lot of flavor. Flavor to be savored.
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Old 01-05-2014, 04:18 PM   #49
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This is some good stuff.

Kathleen thought it would be a good idea to make, and I have to so say I would encourage her to do so again.

Did I mention...
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Old 01-05-2014, 04:35 PM   #50
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Originally Posted by FrankZ View Post


This is some good stuff.

Kathleen thought it would be a good idea to make, and I have to so say I would encourage her to do so again.

Did I mention...
I made it as written except I forgot to buy clam juice so I used a small can of chopped clams. The oyster flavor was still prominent. Delicious. Thank you for sharing this recipe, Steve!
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Steve Kroll's Oyster Stew Having this hearty soup on New Year's Day has been a tradition in our family for a number of years. If you are unable to find bottled clam juice, you can substitute chicken or vegetable stock. [SIZE=3][B]Oyster Stew[/B][/SIZE] [B]Ingredients:[/B] [LIST] [*]2 pints shucked oysters in their liquor [*]8 tbsp butter [*]1/2 cup flour [*]2 shallots, finely chopped [*]4 stalks celery, finely chopped [*]1 clove garlic, minced [*]1/2 cup dry white wine [*]1 8 oz bottle clam juice [*]3 cups half & half [*]2 or 3 good shakes of Tabasco [*]1/2 tsp old bay seasoning [*]1/8 tsp ground nutmeg [*]salt and pepper [/LIST] [B]Preparation:[/B] [LIST=1] [*]Strain the oysters, reserving the liquor. Rinse the oysters under cold water and set aside. [*]Melt the butter in a small dutch oven over medium heat. Stir in the flour to make a roux. Cook the roux for 5 minutes, stirring frequently. [*]Add the shallots, celery, and garlic, and cook for a few minutes longer, until the vegetables are tender. Continue stirring the entire time. [*]Add the white wine, clam juice, and reserved oyster liquor; stir to make a paste. Cook for a couple of minutes to burn off the alcohol. Gradually add the half and half, a cup at a time. Continue stirring and don't let the mixture come to a boil. Reduce the heat to low. [*]Add Tabasco, old bay, and nutmeg. Stir in oysters and cook gently over low heat until the oysters are cooked through and beginning to curl around the edges. [*]Season with salt and pepper to taste. [/LIST] [IMG]http://i892.photobucket.com/albums/ac125/SteveKroll/oyster_stew_zpsa2e28e40.jpg[/IMG] 3 stars 1 reviews
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