"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Soups, Stews & Casseroles > Slow Cookers
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 01-01-2007, 09:08 PM   #1
Senior Cook
 
SueBear's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Council Bluffs, Iowa
Posts: 111
Send a message via Yahoo to SueBear
Question Cooking Pork Roasts and time

I have a question and pretty sure I know the answer but wanted to get a few other thoughts. I'm looking at doing a cp recipe that's calling for a pork roast, no problem. Have one issue with it, no time to spend on this as I'm going to be in graduate classes. The last thing I want to deal with is dinners.

Anyway. In this recipe I'm looking at is it wants the pork to be browned before it's put in the cp.

I found this on the Internet so I'm going by what it has. The recipe I'm following will be

1 tablespoon vegetable oil 2 lb pork roast
salt and pepper to taste 4 potatoes, quartered 1 white onion, quartered 6 cloves garlic 1 14.5 oz chicken broth

The time frame of this recipe is low setting for 6 hours. I'd assume 6 to 8 hrs like the majority of them are. What I found after reading some is recipes that have pork roasts being slow cooked for 10 hrs if they do not have the browing done. What I'm wondering here is can I do the same thing?

Any insight is greatly appreciated.

Sue

__________________

__________________
It's the simple things in life we experience that add spice and sweetness to those every day dull moments.
SueBear is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2007, 07:50 AM   #2
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Straits of Juan de Fuca
Posts: 893
Am I reading this right - can can you cook the roast for 10 hours instead of the 6-8 hours that goes with the browning of the roast?? Yes, sure you can, presentation won't be as nice, your roast won't have any color and nothing in the ingredients will give color. But the flavor should be fine.
__________________

__________________
cjs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2007, 10:01 AM   #3
Head Chef
 
Toots's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Austin TX
Posts: 1,580
This is how I make my pork roast in the crock and I do NOT brown it first

1 onion, sliced
3-4 lb pork roast (get the kind with the bone in it)
3-4 garlic cloves, diced
1 can beef broth
2 T soy sauce

Place sliced onions in the crock and then the roast. Throw everything else in, cook on low 9- 10 hours.

I make a simple gravy with the cooking liquid by doing the following:

melt 1/2 stick butter in a deep skillet
add 1/4 c flour and stir, the flour will bubble up.

add 2-3 cups of the cooking liquid from the roast. Whisk and cook. Gravy wil thicken. Season with salt/pepper.

Serve with mashed potatoes and a side veggie. Easy and not labor intensive dinner.
__________________
Toots is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2007, 02:53 PM   #4
Senior Cook
 
SueBear's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Council Bluffs, Iowa
Posts: 111
Send a message via Yahoo to SueBear
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toots
This is how I make my pork roast in the crock and I do NOT brown it first
That's basically what I'm looking at doing. Thanks Toots!

I don't have time for prep and imho presentation is the last thing on my mind. Suppose moving out to the midwest after awhile you get the train of thought where it doesn't matter who you have to impress any more.

Thanks for the info!
__________________
It's the simple things in life we experience that add spice and sweetness to those every day dull moments.
SueBear is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2007, 05:14 PM   #5
Master Chef
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 9,229
Suebear; it is important to note that slow moist cooking methods, such as thoses done in the slow-cooker give the best results with lesser quality meats, such as pork butt or shoulder roasts, chuck roasts, etc., where there is sufficient connecting tissue and fat to prevent the meat from drying out. Also, cook the roast at the lower temperature if your slow cooker has a low and high setting. The liquid should not boil vigorously, but gently simmer. The goal is to bring the roast to between 180 and 190 degrees. That way, the collagen and fat will melt and produce a glorious texture. The onions and other aromatics you add will have the chance to completely flavor the meat and resultant juices.

I wish you success with your meal. Just don't try to make it with a pork tenderloin or fresh ham. These are too lean for what you are trying to do.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- http://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2007, 04:08 AM   #6
Senior Cook
 
SueBear's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Council Bluffs, Iowa
Posts: 111
Send a message via Yahoo to SueBear
It was a basic pork roast.. nothing special. Yes the cp has the low/high setting on it and I'd planned on doing the low setting so it does the sloooow cook.

First time for using the new cp my hubby got me too. Will let ya'll know how it turns out after I make it.

Sue
__________________
It's the simple things in life we experience that add spice and sweetness to those every day dull moments.
SueBear is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2007, 02:49 AM   #7
Senior Cook
 
SueBear's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Council Bluffs, Iowa
Posts: 111
Send a message via Yahoo to SueBear
been so busy I forgot..

it's been so busy I totally forgot to respond until I happen to come around looking for something else.

Pork roast turned out great. One thing I disovered, my husband actually brought it up was the meat was so tender that we need to start making pulled pork which will be really easy with our hours.

I did a 4 lb beef roast with onions, carrots, and red potatoes the other night -came out wonderful and my husband loved it so much he went back for 2nds and took some to work with him the following day. I've done a Pizza Chicken in it which we both found to be quite tasty. I did a Beef Stroganoff which was very good also.

I'm looking around for a few other ideas still. However I am finding that as I try different recipes and become comfortable using the cp, I can come up with my own.
__________________
It's the simple things in life we experience that add spice and sweetness to those every day dull moments.
SueBear is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2007, 06:21 AM   #8
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 905
There are different "pork roasts" but I am finding that even pork loins benefit from the braising that you do in a crockpot rather than dry roasting.
If you do pulled pork, do it in the regular oven and uncovered to get the crust that is so good with that. You can do it overnight if you are afraid of leaving your oven on while you are not at home.
__________________
Candocook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2007, 06:09 PM   #9
Senior Cook
 
SueBear's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Council Bluffs, Iowa
Posts: 111
Send a message via Yahoo to SueBear
Quote:
Originally Posted by Candocook
There are different "pork roasts" but I am finding that even pork loins benefit from the braising that you do in a crockpot rather than dry roasting.
If you do pulled pork, do it in the regular oven and uncovered to get the crust that is so good with that. You can do it overnight if you are afraid of leaving your oven on while you are not at home.
Don't have time to deal with things in the oven.. graduate student going for my MBA so paying attention things in the oven is out of the question.

I won't turn the oven on while I'm sleeping either, not something I feel comfortable with, older house. It's just an easier and convenient way of getting things accomplished in the long run for me. A good thought process but not something that would be feasible at this time.
__________________

__________________
It's the simple things in life we experience that add spice and sweetness to those every day dull moments.
SueBear is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:48 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.