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Old 02-14-2007, 03:57 PM   #1
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Crockpot liquid levels

I'm a bit unclear as to how much liquid to add when I'm cooking something. My recipes have conflicting advice.

If I have, say, a cylindricalish roast, how much of it should be covered by liquid? A quarter of the way? Halfway? Completely? I know that crockpot cooked meats create liquid on their own but how far up do you fill your crockpots?



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Old 02-14-2007, 04:03 PM   #2
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Old 03-01-2007, 08:30 PM   #3
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There is no real right or wrong way. Just add some liquid and cover it up. if you have too much liquid at the end, put the excess in a saucepan and cook it over high until it reduces to a thicker consistency. If you want to make a gravy out of the drippings stirr in a couple of table spoons of flour a little at a time until dissolved and then let simmer for a few minutes.

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Old 03-01-2007, 09:16 PM   #4
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I place my seasonings in the bottom of the crockpot and then add one cup of liquid in the bottom of the crockpot and place the meat in over it. This will keep the ceramic pot from cracking and add the moisture for dry seasonings.
After 2-3 hours If it looks to be drying out, add another cup of very warm water and recheck it after about 30 minutes. Just add small amounts of water as needed so the meat juices are not deluded.
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Old 03-02-2007, 05:44 AM   #5
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I think it depends on the recipe but less is probably better. If you are leaving it all day, then be sure your liquid level is sufficient. And as the poster up a bit says, you can always concentrate your juices--which I think is a better idea than not putting enough liquid in.
Another way to help concentrate your juices that is used when oven braising is to put a layer of parchment paper or foil (if there isn't tomato in your recipe) touching the surface of your crockpot ingredients. The liquid condenses on it and drops right back, concentrating your liquid.
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Old 03-02-2007, 06:58 AM   #6
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If I do a roast in the crock pot, I just put the roast in - season, sliced or whole onions on top and enough water to cover bottom of pot, not very much. Then just cook on low all day,
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Old 03-02-2007, 09:03 AM   #7
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I think I'm right there with Barb. I don't think I add 1/2c and maybe closer to 1/3. This is when I do a chuck roast that takes up the whole bottom of my oval slow cooker. I add carrots, onions and potatos so it gets additional moisture from them. I used to put everything on top of the meat and season it last, figuring the liquids produced from the veggies will slowly mix with the seasoning and seep down over everything. It always came out good, but for something different I recently started putting the carrots on the bottom and the meat on top of them. The roast retains more of its "sear" this way as it's not setting in the rising liquids.
This works if I'm looking to eat in 3-1/2 hours or 6.
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