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Old 05-18-2011, 11:37 AM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlieD View Post
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Sorry, growing up in Soviet Union caviar was not such a big deal,
...
That's exactly why I like hearing your input on this.
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Old 05-18-2011, 04:56 PM   #22
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i only buy cheap caviar, but would like to try the really good stuff someday, if I can find it. I don't know if others do this, but I slice an hb egg, set one slice on a cracker, then add the caviar followed by minced green onions as a topper.
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Old 05-18-2011, 08:39 PM   #23
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Well, here's the thing. An ounce of the really good stuff (Osetra to Beluga) is about $130 to $180. For just an ounce! I don't really understand why it is so expensive. So out of reach for most people (unless you grew up in the Soviet Union and had connections to bath in it of course ). I've tried many of them and they ARE fantastic but I couldn't justify the price unless I won the lottery.

But, Paddlefish caviar is anywhere from $14-20 per ounce. That's 10 times cheaper than the really good stuff. I think it used to be even less but might have gone up possibly. But either way it's still in the range of affordable now. A two ounce tin at Kelly's is only $27. (plus the shipping). A little more at Marky's (who also has the $180 per ounce stuff and everything else - it's a Russian Caviar importer and they have farms etc.)

If anyone knows of any black caviar that is cheaper than that is on par I'd like to know! I keep experimenting and trying different ones but haven't come across anything near that price range or less that is anywhere near as good. But, anyway, yeah I like to make the toppings you see in the picture I posted. Egg whites separate from the egg yokes, chopped onions, sour cream... that's more the standard stuff but sometimes I change things around a little bit. But ideally the other topping use would be subtle so you can taste the great flavor of the caviar... if it does in fact have a great flavor and isn't too salty and iffy tasting.
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Old 05-18-2011, 09:45 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by infinitecookbook
Well, here's the thing. An ounce of the really good stuff (Osetra to Beluga) is about $130 to $180. For just an ounce! I don't really understand why it is so expensive. So out of reach for most people (unless you grew up in the Soviet Union and had connections to bath in it of course ). I've tried many of them and they ARE fantastic but I couldn't justify the price unless I won the lottery.

But, Paddlefish caviar is anywhere from $14-20 per ounce. That's 10 times cheaper than the really good stuff. I think it used to be even less but might have gone up possibly. But either way it's still in the range of affordable now. A two ounce tin at Kelly's is only $27. (plus the shipping). A little more at Marky's (who also has the $180 per ounce stuff and everything else - it's a Russian Caviar importer and they have farms etc.)

If anyone knows of any black caviar that is cheaper than that is on par I'd like to know! I keep experimenting and trying different ones but haven't come across anything near that price range or less that is anywhere near as good. But, anyway, yeah I like to make the toppings you see in the picture I posted. Egg whites separate from the egg yokes, chopped onions, sour cream... that's more the standard stuff but sometimes I change things around a little bit. But ideally the other topping use would be subtle so you can taste the great flavor of the caviar... if it does in fact have a great flavor and isn't too salty and iffy tasting.
Best I have ever had was on St. Martin about 20 some years ago. We drove half way up a mountain, signed up on an outside blackboard, went back later and had a fantastic dinner in a tiny spot with only 6 tables. The app was some kind of cream cheese/sour cream/green onion tart mixed with and covered with tiny black fish eggs, so pure and delicious, they melted and popped in your mouth. I had had good caviar before this, but this was the stuff dreams were made of. Have not had anything like it since.
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