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Old 10-11-2014, 07:11 AM   #1
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Family fussy about curries

Hi all

I love curries but my hubby and kids only ever eaten colmans mild curry sauce mix. I have been searching for ages for these but they no longer sell them.

I would love to be able to make it in batches so that when I come home from work it dont take long to cook dinner :)

can anyone help me with a recipe that is very close to the colmans mild curry sauce mix please.

thank you

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Old 10-11-2014, 09:04 AM   #2
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If you can find Sharwoods brand you will be OK. Look for 'Korma' strength either in jars or packet form. I confess that I prefer Pataks brand if I am not making my own but they may be a bit too spicy for your family
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Old 10-11-2014, 09:23 AM   #3
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Hi

Thank you
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Old 10-11-2014, 05:58 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by menumaker View Post
If you can find Sharwoods brand you will be OK. Look for 'Korma' strength either in jars or packet form. I confess that I prefer Pataks brand if I am not making my own but they may be a bit too spicy for your family
Pataks' brand korma and pasanda sauces in jars are not "hot" at all. I strongly suspect my local Indian restaurant uses them as their korma tastes exactly the same. The only possible problem is that they both contain nuts which may be a problem if you have any nut allergies in the family.

Patak's butter chicken sauce isn't too bad either - a bit more chilli than the korma but not enough to upset me. ( I have a problem with chillies) so look for the one chilli mark.

Pataks' all have the 1-3 chilli symbols on the label to indicate "hotness".

I don't use a lot of pre-packed mixes but I'll make an exception for Pataks and I know of at least one Indian lady who swears by them!
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Old 10-11-2014, 09:17 PM   #5
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I see that folks from England are fixated on Indian curry. Don't you folks expand your horizons into Thai curry?
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Old 10-11-2014, 09:54 PM   #6
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I was thinking the same thing. I've found a few Indian curries I like, but I've found only a few Thai curries I don't like.

I think more or less Thai curries are based on coconut milk while Indian curries are based on yoghurt.

Any Asian store has plenty of Maeploy (brand--which I recommend) curry paste flavors and lots of coconut milk. Curries are easy to cook. You can start out with just these two ingredients, and maybe some nam pla (fish sauce) if you want. Add some crab or shrimp paste for more flavor. I have found curries easy and quick to prepare depending on how elaborate you want.

I recommend their sweet chilli sauce too.
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Old 10-12-2014, 09:57 AM   #7
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I was thinking the same thing. I've found a few Indian curries I like, but I've found only a few Thai curries I don't like.

I think more or less Thai curries are based on coconut milk while Indian curries are based on yoghurt.

Any Asian store has plenty of Maeploy (brand--which I recommend) curry paste flavors and lots of coconut milk. Curries are easy to cook. You can start out with just these two ingredients, and maybe some nam pla (fish sauce) if you want. Add some crab or shrimp paste for more flavor. I have found curries easy and quick to prepare depending on how elaborate you want.

I recommend their sweet chilli sauce too.
Knowing Colman's sauces as I do, I suspect the problem the OP (who's in the UK) has with her family is with hot spices.

Coconut milk isn't solely a Thai thing. It's used fairly extensively in the cuisine of many areas of India and also by some religious groups who are effectively vegan (such as some Jains).
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Old 10-12-2014, 11:09 AM   #8
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I see that folks from England are fixated on Indian curry. Don't you folks expand your horizons into Thai curry?
India was "ours":Thailand wasn't. A lot of British families had lived in India for generations and during the governance of the East India Company their male employees were encouraged to marry Indian wives. Others went out there as servicemen or civil servants or business men during the years of the "Raj". As they had Indian servants, including cooks, they learned to enjoy Indian food and when they returned to Britain throughout the 18th, 19th and early 20th centuries they brought their tastes (and their servants ) with them. The 1901 census shows more than 70,000 Indians resident in Britain comprising Indian seamen, soldiers, diplomats, scholars, officials, tourists, businessmen and students .

The British merchant fleet employed Indian sailors from the 18thC onwards and many of them landed here and, because they were unable to get passages back to India, they settled mainly in sea ports taking such jobs as were available. Many of them were cooks and earned a living cooking for their compatriots. The first Indian restaurant in Britain opened in 1810.

Indian food became very popular in the home from an early date - Hannah Glasse's domestic cookery book, "The Art of Cookery", first published in 1747 included recipes for Indian dishes and Queen Victoria (reigned 1837-1901) had a penchant for Indian food, establishing a special kitchen staffed by Indians to cook it. Actually, "curry" isn't a dish at all. It isn't even an Indian word. It's just a made up word coined to describe a wide range of Indian (and now Thai) dishes. It may come from an old English word for "cooking" which in turn came from the French - there was a mediaeval cookery book called "The Forme of Cury" dating from the 1390s - centuries before the word was used for an Indian dish.

Post WWII, before and after independence, there was a further influx of (usually male) Indian immigration to take up work in various trades and professions and in 1972, when Asians (ie people from the Indian sub-continent)were expelled from Uganda many chose to come to Britain. This all expanded the number and popularity of Indian restaurants and the availability of ingredients for Indian cooking in high street stores.

We were importing foodstuffs and recipes from all over the known world as early as the first crusade in the 11th Century AD.

Thai restaurants are relatively new arrivals to the British dining-out experience but have taken off, probably due to the opening up of Thailand to the tourist trade, and domestic cooking has slowly caught up but it still lags a long way behind the Indian food tradition in Britain.
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