"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Sauces, Marinades, Rubs > Sauces
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 11-25-2014, 06:48 AM   #21
Master Chef
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 9,229
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cheryl J View Post
I alternate between canned and homemade stock (or broth). This year I made my own for gravy and stuffing, but I probably won't next year. But who knows.

Sorry chief, but I was kind of surprised to see this gravy thread posted as "perfect", especially since it was meant for less experienced cooks, as you said. Also, I didn't see anyone claim their turkey, dressing, or potatoes were 'perfect'. When I was a new cook it was a challenge to even make the roux, let alone making stock for gravy from scratch .
The perfect part is simply meant to say that you can make the gravy that you like. That's why I gave multiple thickening agents, and techniques, to give the new cook something to work with.

Of course perfect is a very subjective word. There is no perfect gravy, only perfect for me, perfect for you, etc. We all have an expectation of how we want our food to taste, look, and even feel. I opened this thread not to state that my gravies and sauces were perfect, but to get the more seasoned cooks here to post their own favorite gravy recipe, be it from a jar, a packet, or making it from scratch. I just want us to share the wealth of knowledge. If perfect is the wrong word, maybe one of the ops can change the title to "Our Best Gravies and Sauces for Thanksgiving Day". I don't mind.

Please understand, I have learned much from this site. I simply wanted to give something back, and hopefully inspire others to do the same. In the spirit of thanksgiving, I'm thankful for what I know, and the help I've received along the way, and the help I'll certainly require in the future.

I request we forget about the word perfect, and submit something useful.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
__________________

__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- http://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-25-2014, 07:15 AM   #22
Executive Chef
 
bakechef's Avatar
Site Moderator
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 4,082
Quote:
Originally Posted by Addie View Post
I don't think I have ever bought a jar of gravy. I do buy the gravy packets. Only for just myself. I will often get a hankering for gravy over toast. And those packets make just enough gravy for a couple of slices of toast. Something my mother often made for me. But a jar? For that much gravy, I will make my own from scratch.
The stuff from the jar is usually pretty bad. Every one that I've had has this odd flavor that I cannot identify for the life of me. The packets are better, and such an easy way to get a little gravy when there are no drippings around.
__________________

__________________
I'm Bloggin'

http://bakingbetter.com
bakechef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-25-2014, 07:22 AM   #23
Master Chef
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 9,229
Quote:
Originally Posted by bakechef View Post
The stuff from the jar is usually pretty bad. Every one that I've had has this odd flavor that I cannot identify for the life of me. The packets are better, and such an easy way to get a little gravy when there are no drippings around.
So give us your favorite packet brand, and what you do to make gravy with it.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- http://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-25-2014, 07:38 AM   #24
Master Chef
 
Aunt Bea's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: near Mount Pilot
Posts: 7,005
When I don't have any meat drippings I start by sauteing an onion or a small can of mushroom stems and pieces in butter, sprinkle in flour to make a roux, freshly ground black pepper and add "stock" made with powdered boullion in boiling water or hot milk. I taste it and add salt, if needed, at the very end. Sometimes I add a splash or soy sauce or Worcestershire sauce if I'm making "beef" gravy. No animals were harmed in the making of this gravy!

I stopped buying canned stock after seeing a piece on America's Test Kitchen that explained the stock we buy is all made from reconstituted dehydrated powders. Now I use Goya packets if I can't make my own stock.
__________________
Aunt Bea is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-25-2014, 08:20 AM   #25
Master Chef
 
jennyema's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Boston
Posts: 9,257
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kayelle View Post
I'm totally with you there bakechef. Last year I did the whole nine yards with all the "falderol" of making my own stock ahead of time, and I could tell no difference in the ultimate outcome. There's no shame in leaving stock/broth making to experts, but that's just my opinion.
I'm with you both, too.

But I think homemade turkey stock makes a huge difference.

The absolute key to good gravy (and any pan sauce) is FOND. I roast up a half dozen turkey legs the day before just to collect more fond,
__________________
Less is not more. More is more and more is fabulous.
jennyema is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-25-2014, 08:31 AM   #26
Wine Guy
 
Steve Kroll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Twin Cities, Minnesota
Posts: 5,408
Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
The absolute key to good gravy (and any pan sauce) is FOND. I roast up a half dozen turkey legs the day before just to collect more fond,
I'm fond of fond!

I also get good results from roasting the bones and carcasses - along with some of the veggies - in the oven before making stock with them. It really seems to bring out more flavor.
__________________
Steve Kroll is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-25-2014, 09:17 AM   #27
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 16,856
We're talking about two kinds of stock here: Basic stock where the meat and mirepoix are put directly into water for simmering, and brown stock where they are roasted before simmering. I prefer the richer, more caramelized flavor of the brown stock, so I make my own, because the commercial stocks aren't roasted first. They're good for some applications, and I always have Better than Bouillon on hand because it's much lighter (in weight), lasts longer, and imo tastes better than boxed or canned. But for Thanksgiving gravy, I want the brown stock.

And I agree with Jenny about the fond. I made my stock this year with turkey wings and will make more with the carcass (if my mom will give it to me I don't think she'll want to make stock) to use for soups and stews later in the winter. But the brown stock is a primary key to a great-tasting gravy. I roasted the wings and mirepoix for about an hour; the veggies were done, but the wings weren't brown enough for me, so I put them in the toaster oven for another 1/2 hour. I don't boil it; I let it simmer for about four hours.

The other key is to cook the flour in the fat for a few minutes before adding the liquid, so you don't have a raw flour taste in the gravy. Use one of the methods mentioned earlier to make the gravy, season to taste with salt and pepper, and you're good to go. If you use a brown stock, there will be no need to boost the flavor with any other additives.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	2014-11-19 14.37.28.jpg
Views:	93
Size:	60.4 KB
ID:	22268   Click image for larger version

Name:	2014-11-19 15.55.12.jpg
Views:	91
Size:	77.7 KB
ID:	22269  

Click image for larger version

Name:	2014-11-20 14.10.16.jpg
Views:	91
Size:	74.5 KB
ID:	22270   Click image for larger version

Name:	2014-11-20 15.36.41.jpg
Views:	102
Size:	64.8 KB
ID:	22271  

Click image for larger version

Name:	turkey stock.jpg
Views:	94
Size:	55.3 KB
ID:	22272  
__________________
The trouble with eating Italian food is that five or six days later you're hungry again. ~ George Miller
GotGarlic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-25-2014, 09:37 AM   #28
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 16,856
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dawgluver View Post
Whoa, 70, Andy! And Kayelle, you sure don't look your age!

I'm wondering if I should bring gravy to my cousin's dinner. It would have to start from stock in a box. I have no drippings, as the turkey will be cooked by her BIL. But from recalling the last 3 years, none of these folks know how to cook, and everything is so bland and tasteless. And gluten-free. Love 'em anyway.
I would. You can add the drippings, minus the fat, when you get there. It will be nice for everyone to have something delicious to put on the rest of the food
__________________
The trouble with eating Italian food is that five or six days later you're hungry again. ~ George Miller
GotGarlic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-25-2014, 10:19 AM   #29
Executive Chef
 
bethzaring's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Northern New Mexico
Posts: 4,598
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post


I will soon be 70




Thanks GW for this thread. I have always avoided making gravy. On Monday I roasted a turkey and made gravy from the drippings, before I found this thread. I thought it turned out okay, but will try roasting parts before the main feast to make more fond.
__________________
Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has. Margaret Mead
bethzaring is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-25-2014, 10:37 AM   #30
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,362
I don't know what the pricing is like in other parts of the US, but where I shop, turkey parts such as wings and drumsticks are much more expensive than a whole turkey. Two trays of turkey parts (a couple of wings and drumsticks in each) costs as much as a 10-pound frozen turkey! That's why I buy the whole turkey, save the breasts and thighs for another day and use the rest for stock and gravy.
__________________

__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
gravy, other

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:55 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.