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Old 11-19-2011, 07:49 PM   #21
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I exploded a pyrex once by turning on the stove without removing the glass dish.
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Old 07-22-2012, 01:04 AM   #22
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yep, I actually has some and they cracked. I wouldn't recommend it.
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Old 07-22-2012, 04:01 AM   #23
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Pyrex are great in my opinion...they are very durable and tough....we have never had one break and I have even had one drop on a tiled floor

We have 4 pyrex jugs and 4 pyrex bowls, wouldnt be without them
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Old 08-06-2012, 09:47 AM   #24
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Im totally scared to cook with glass. Does it actually work ?
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Old 08-06-2012, 04:52 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kylie_oo View Post
Im totally scared to cook with glass. Does it actually work ?
It works really well in the oven, but you do need oven safe glass.
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Old 08-22-2012, 07:32 AM   #26
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Oven safe glass is safe for, well, OVEN use. I've been baking in Pyrex for 50 years, not a single broken dish ever.

The broken Pyrex in the Consumer's Reports tests were broken by NOT following the correct procedures for use, and took several attempts to get them to break at that. I have never come across an incident of broken Pyrex that didn't involve user error.

For instance, if you pull the hot dish out of the oven and set it on the cold stovetop, which many people do routinely, it is unlikely to break the first, second, third, etc. time that you do that. However, each time you do this, it creates stress fractures which cannot be seen with the naked eye.

Then, eventually, it will "explode" in the oven when those stress fractures have reached the point of no return and get heated up one time too many. Meanwhile the cook who's been abusing the cookware for months or years stands there and says, "But I didn't do a thing to it!".

Yes they did. Cumulative damaged caused over time by misuse.
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Old 08-22-2012, 09:24 AM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kitchen Barbarian View Post
Oven safe glass is safe for, well, OVEN use. I've been baking in Pyrex for 50 years, not a single broken dish ever.

The broken Pyrex in the Consumer's Reports tests were broken by NOT following the correct procedures for use, and took several attempts to get them to break at that. I have never come across an incident of broken Pyrex that didn't involve user error.

For instance, if you pull the hot dish out of the oven and set it on the cold stovetop, which many people do routinely, it is unlikely to break the first, second, third, etc. time that you do that. However, each time you do this, it creates stress fractures which cannot be seen with the naked eye.

Then, eventually, it will "explode" in the oven when those stress fractures have reached the point of no return and get heated up one time too many. Meanwhile the cook who's been abusing the cookware for months or years stands there and says, "But I didn't do a thing to it!".

Yes they did. Cumulative damaged caused over time by misuse.
Winner!
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Old 08-22-2012, 09:56 AM   #28
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Pyrex used to be synonymous with glass that could withstand the pressures created as direct flame was applied to the cold glass. You could put it on the stovetop over a gas flame and boil liquid, or fry an egg. Most scientific glass ware, test tubes, beakers, pipettes, etc. were Pyrex brand. The glass was more expensive to make. It was called boro-sicllicate glass. Regular baking and casserole dishes were made with tempered glass, which can be heated in an oven, but can't take the direct heat of a flame.

Sadly, Pyrex no longer uses boro-sillicate glass for their consumer cookware. They too use tempered glass. I had a Pyrex chafing dish that came with a couple of tea candles to keep the food warm. I didn't want to have to keep replacing the tea candles, and didn't think they'd keep the food hot enough. So replaced them with Sterno fuel cans, which are made to keep chafing dishes warm. I walked away from the chafing dish to do other things necessary to present the meal. I heard a loud, shattering sound, and turned to find that my chafing dish had broken, catastrophically.

The problem with glass (and ceramics) is that it just isn't flexible. If put over temperatures that are very different than the ambient temperature of the glass, the outside surface begins to expand, as to all materials. But glass is an insulator, and so the heat migration through the material is slow. The outer surface expands much more rapidly that does the rest of the glass. This creates enough molecular pressure that in short order, the glass shatters. Boro-silicate was able to withstand the temperature extremes, without shattering, which is why it was so popular. Tempered glass is resistant to breakage from mechanical shock, but not so much from thermal shock.

No, I don't stand by Pyrex brand anymore, as it is only good for oven use, and requires significant care. I now use stainless steel, cast iron, or aluminum cookware. I have a Corning casserole dish, but it's rarely used.

You can use it safely, but I prefer other materials that I know won't fail.

Seeeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 08-22-2012, 10:15 AM   #29
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There is way, way, way, WAY more to it than that.

It's not about borosilicate glass versus soda lime glass. It's more about annealing and other manufacturing processes.

Even back when they were using borosilicate glass for their bakeware, Pyrex ovenware was NOT stove-top safe. You had to get the Flameware for that.

The lab glassware you're talking about is yet another kettle of fish. It doesn't even enter into this particular conversation.

There are advantages to soda-lime glass over the borosilicate. Soda-lime is generally a little more forgiving of mechanical shocks, such as being whanged into the corner of the counter, dropped, or having something dropped on it in the sink.

Borosilicate glass is a little more forgiving of thermal shock.

However, when properly handled, thermal shock isn't an issue (or shouldn't be - when used correctly). So the advantage of the soda-lime glass is that it gives the user some extra protection from those daily incidents we don't have a lot of control over, such as accidentally whacking your pan into something.

Doesn't matter whether it's soda-lime or borosilicate, neither glass is appropriate used stove-top or over an open flame, unless it's been put through the specific manufacturing and annealing processes that gives you Flameware. That's an expensive process, and I see no reason to use it for my everyday bakeware.

I'm really glad to have it for my Pyrex double-boiler, however.
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Old 08-22-2012, 10:54 AM   #30
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I have had it happen several times. Completly ruins dinner and glass and food go everywhere.Cleaning up after it is a mess. I only use Pyrex now and don't keep them when they get too scratched. I have had the cheap stuff do it out of the micro and oven. I have never used glass on the cooktop.
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