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Old 10-02-2007, 07:20 PM   #11
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Looks like a great job on seasoning.

The Wok looks sort of like a Northern style wok or "pao" wok. This type of wok usually is round bottomed with a long hollow metal handle.

Kirk

mmm-yoso!!!
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Old 10-02-2007, 08:07 PM   #12
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Your food presentation on that plate looked absolutely beautiful - fit for a magazine or cookbook! Go and have fun with your new wok.
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Old 10-02-2007, 09:08 PM   #13
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the smallish 14" or so wok with a welded handle is a pow wok, Chinese, used as a subsidiary to the huge double ring handled woks on the main burners of Asian stoves. They move partially cooked ingredients to the back holding area until reincorporation. But becaus eof their size, they are often great for stir frying for a small meal at home. I have one and a 16" ring handle one.
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Old 10-03-2007, 03:21 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Green Lady View Post
Your food presentation on that plate looked absolutely beautiful - fit for a magazine or cookbook! Go and have fun with your new wok.
Thank you
I could have made it a lot prettier, but I was hungry and excited about using my newly seasoned toy. I try to cook for the eyes as much as I do the pallette. I usually like cutting all my veggies and meat in neat little uniform sizes so they cook evenly. That was more thrown together than my usual efforts, but the taste and learning to use my new wok was my main concern.

My wok has a hollow handle that is riveted to the pan part, and a round bottom. I have heard that without a high output burner you are really just steaming the food (especially if your veggies are not properly dried) and not doing a true stir fry, but to me it taste pretty close to what I have had from places I know use a high output burner. I am still learning and that was why I started this thread. I still have a lot of research to do and a ton of things I want to try. Kinda why I started this thread since I didn't really see anything like it here, and I hope I am not the only one that is curious about woks, and asian cooking.
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Old 10-03-2007, 07:52 AM   #15
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Originally Posted by hookied_up View Post
My wok has a hollow handle that is riveted to the pan part, and a round bottom. I have heard that without a high output burner you are really just steaming the food (especially if your veggies are not properly dried) and not doing a true stir fry, but to me it taste pretty close to what I have had from places I know use a high output burner. I am still learning and that was why I started this thread. I still have a lot of research to do and a ton of things I want to try. Kinda why I started this thread since I didn't really see anything like it here, and I hope I am not the only one that is curious about woks, and asian cooking.
A high-output burner is not necessary to produce a traditional stir-fry. Restaurants use such burners to produce a lot of food quickly for serving to customers, but stir-frying in a wok is a cooking method developed to conserve scarce fuel - the oldest civilization on earth used up much of its forests early on And if you don't have a lot of fuel to begin with, you won't be using lots of it to prepare your food. From Chef's Toque Culinaire - Kitchen Management - Chefs Kitchen :

"Chinese cookery is basically quick cooking and best known for the unique-shaped frying pan called the wok. The wok is designed in a way to circulate heat quickly and evenly while keeping its contents in constant motion. The Chinese cook uses small, chopped ingredients, so he can expose the maximum amount of food surface to heat in the quickest possible time to conserve a most valuable and diminishing component: fuel. A sauce can easily be made with the ingredients, again, to conserve fuel."
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Old 10-03-2007, 10:27 AM   #16
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hei..I'm using that kind of wok everyday for my meals,it's good you like it
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Old 10-03-2007, 10:49 AM   #17
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The seasoning looks great, but I'm curious; is it "sticky" at all when you touch it?
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Old 10-03-2007, 03:17 PM   #18
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I am thinking about getting the ring for it just so its sits on the stove easier. I was worried the ring would keep it too high from the flame and I wouldnt get a high enough temp, but I am willing to give it a try.
Before you go out and spend and $, take some aluminum foil and fashion a ring out of that and try it out to see if it does what you want it to do.
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Old 10-04-2007, 04:39 AM   #19
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Before you go out and spend and $, take some aluminum foil and fashion a ring out of that and try it out to see if it does what you want it to do.
I like that idea. I am a little bit skeptical about the ring because I think the heat is suppoesed to go up the sides of the pan so you have an are where the food is getting an indirect heat. The ring seems like it would concentrate the heat on the bottom and make the sides cooler. However I do like the idea of the ring because I am a little worried about my wok just rolling off the stove top some day. I would like to try deep frying in it some day but would want something under it if I was going to do that. I am also thinking about a propane type high output burner in the future. It's not a must have, but I would like to see the difference it makes whn cooking on it.

Keltin- it is not sticky or tacky in the least. It looks shiny and almost wet but the patina is pretty much baked on to the wok.

girlgioush- so far I am in love! I have used it for everything from eggs to frying potatoes. I made some chili tonight and used it to brown the burger. I don't know how I cooked all these years without one! Part of it is the noveltyof something new, but it really is easier to move food around in and isolate parts of the food I want to cook faster as opposed to the things I pull up to the sides of the pan.

GotGarlic- Chef's Toque Culinaire - Kitchen Management - Chefs Kitchen :
That looks like a great article. I bookmarked it and will be sure to read the whole thing soon. I didn't know the wok went that far back, but now I know a little better why people that do use them swear by them.
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Old 10-04-2007, 08:45 AM   #20
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I don't think the ring will effect the heating of the sides. The heat is transferred through the metal up the sides.
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