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Old 03-24-2015, 04:12 PM   #11
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Cajun Mustard

Ingredients:

2oz dry mustard
1 Tbs cornstarch
¼ cup water
1 clove garlic, minced
3 Tbs white wine vinegar
1 Tbs honey
1 Tbs crushed red pepper flakes
1 tsp dried oregano
1 tsp ground cumin
1 tsp dried thyme
1 tsp coarse black pepper
1 tsp paprika
Instructions:

Combine the dry mustard and flour. Gradually stir in 1/4 cup cold water and let stand 15 minutes. Stir in the remaining ingredients and mix thoroughly. Makes about ½ cup.
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Old 03-24-2015, 06:02 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlieD View Post
I buy Coleman mustard powder and use their recipe. It's really hot.


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The original Mr Colman is supposed to have said that he made his fortune from the mustard people left on their plates rather than the mustard they actually ate.

Like Addie, I have bits of useless but interesting trivia lurking in the back of my brain
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Old 03-24-2015, 06:55 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mad Cook View Post
The original Mr Colman is supposed to have said that he made his fortune from the mustard people left on their plates rather than the mustard they actually ate.

Like Addie, I have bits of useless but interesting trivia lurking in the back of my brain

That's interesting. I had heard it was Mr. French of French's mustard fame who said that. Either way, I believe it's a true statement.
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Old 03-25-2015, 08:43 AM   #14
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Which mustard seed is hotter? The yellow or brown? Are they too hard to grind using a mortar and pestle? Or would you leave them whole for the final product? When someone says they want to make their own mustard, I assume it is from scratch. And that to me means grinding the seeds. I doubt you could get it to the powdered consistency like Coleman's. But I see mustard on the grocery shelves with bits of the ground seed in them.
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Old 03-25-2015, 10:07 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
Interesting topic. Learning a lot here. I thought you just followed the instructions on the tin of Keen's Mustard:

For the table
"Mix gradually with cold water to the consistency of very thick cream, stirring well and breaking up all lumps.
After mixing, the mustard should stand 10 minutes to develop full flavour."

I'm not a big fan of mustard as a condiment. I use it mostly as an ingredient and usually from seed, but sometimes from powder. (Okay, I use a bit of prepared Dijon both as ingredient and condiment.)
The powder in the Keen's tin is already mustard. The water just liquefies the powder.
I'm talking about making real mustard from mustard seeds. Night and day difference.
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Old 03-25-2015, 10:13 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Addie View Post
Which mustard seed is hotter? The yellow or brown? Are they too hard to grind using a mortar and pestle? Or would you leave them whole for the final product? When someone says they want to make their own mustard, I assume it is from scratch. And that to me means grinding the seeds. I doubt you could get it to the powdered consistency like Coleman's. But I see mustard on the grocery shelves with bits of the ground seed in them.
The mildest seeds are the yellow ones. Then the brown then the black. Black ones are used in Indian foods and are VERY hot!
My recipe calls for soaking the seeds (brown) overnight then adding the other ingredients then grinding in a coffee bean grinder. They grind up easily after soaking overnight. I like to leave some of the seeds just barely ground to give the finished result a 'grainy' texture which is traditional in many French mustards.
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Old 03-25-2015, 10:40 AM   #17
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I just finished making another batch of mustard this morning. The photo is exactly like the mustard I make.
I'd post a photo of my mustard if I could figure out how it.Traditional Dijon Mustard In A Glass Jar Stock Photo, Picture And Royalty Free Image. Pic 20588946.
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Old 03-25-2015, 10:54 AM   #18
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What's the point of leaving chinks of mustard seed in the mix rather than having a smooth purée?
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Old 03-25-2015, 11:03 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Addie View Post
Which mustard seed is hotter? The yellow or brown? Are they too hard to grind using a mortar and pestle? Or would you leave them whole for the final product? When someone says they want to make their own mustard, I assume it is from scratch. And that to me means grinding the seeds. I doubt you could get it to the powdered consistency like Coleman's. But I see mustard on the grocery shelves with bits of the ground seed in them.
In stores I see everything from the completely puréed French's style of yellow mustard to very grainy stone ground mustard (I assume this sort of what you'd get if you ground it in a mortar after the soaking). I like both textures for different things. A well stacked gourmet ham or salami sandwich needs some grainy, nicely flavored spicy mustard, while a basic hot dog screams for the plain old French's (with some sweet relish and chopped raw onion - maybe some diced jalapeño ).
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Old 03-25-2015, 11:07 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by puffin3 View Post
The powder in the Keen's tin is already mustard. The water just liquefies the powder.
I'm talking about making real mustard from mustard seeds. Night and day difference.
I had picked up on that. I did say I was learning a lot in this thread.

Edit: I just checked. The stuff in the Keen's Mustard tin is just "double fine mustard", so I don't really understand what you mean by "It's already mustard", well so are mustard seeds. Isn't what you are talking about ground mustard plus other ingredients, like vinegar and salt? Certainly, stuff that is homemade and has added ingredients would very different from just adding water to mustard powder. Spices that are already ground don't have as much flavour as grinding them yourself.
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