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Old 12-27-2007, 12:50 PM   #31
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Originally Posted by Fisher's Mom View Post
I definitely heard about the plastic gears that were on most of the models - even the top of the line ones. If you go to the forum at KitchenAid.com, you'll read a lot about it. That would really upset me if I had made a high dollar purchase and then the appliance broke. I made sure the new one I just bought had the metal gears/transmission. I wonder if you could e-mail KA and explain it just as you did here and perhaps they would do something for you. I've had a lot of luck writing polite complaint letters.
how did you make sure that yours had the metal gears/transmission?
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Old 12-27-2007, 01:16 PM   #32
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KathyJ,
The best way to ensure this is to contact directly KA and ask about the model you are buying, they have a lot of customer feedback on the plastic gears issue.

I checked a KA brochure I got at Macy's last month. It indicates mixers KL26M8X (Pro Line), KP26M1X (Pro 600 series) and KV25GOX (Pro 5 series) are the only ones with all Steel Gears Direct-Drive Transmission. All other mixers are listed at having "Direct-Drive Transmission" which I deduct uses plastic gears.

Good luck with your search.
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Old 12-27-2007, 01:47 PM   #33
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Thank you, thank you!!
though Amazon has complaints from people who have purchased the KA600 that have broke.....
probably will wait until next Christmas when they have the rebate going again and check around. Amazon had an awesome price on a white (meringue) in early Dec this year - maybe they'll do it again next year.

I have a small Oster stand mixer that I use for pastry dough and cookies and it works just fine. Just have had the KA 600 on my wish list for a while - one of those "just gotta have" things!!! lol. Plus I like the accessories options!!
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Old 12-27-2007, 02:02 PM   #34
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Unless I misread the listings in the online catalog:

KitchenAidŽ: Find Stand Mixers

it is the bowl-lift standing mixers which have metal gears. All of the tilt-head models, apparently, use plastic.
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Old 12-27-2007, 05:09 PM   #35
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Originally Posted by wysiwyg View Post
KathyJ,
The best way to ensure this is to contact directly KA and ask about the model you are buying, they have a lot of customer feedback on the plastic gears issue.

I checked a KA brochure I got at Macy's last month. It indicates mixers KL26M8X (Pro Line), KP26M1X (Pro 600 series) and KV25GOX (Pro 5 series) are the only ones with all Steel Gears Direct-Drive Transmission. All other mixers are listed at having "Direct-Drive Transmission" which I deduct uses plastic gears.

Good luck with your search.


Please let me reflect on the subject on the direct drive transmission, if I may.
There IS a difference between plastic gears and nylon gears.

1. Plastic gears are what you might find in childrens' toys or the cheap flimsy
no-name hand-held mixers. This type of gear has low quality, is not very strong and can break even if a moderate load factor is placed on them.

2. Nylon gear transmissions are used in the lower-priced K'Aid Sand Mixers.
This type of gear- even though it might not be as strong and durable as metal, it is much stronger than ordinary plastic gears. They HAVE to be in order for the machine to plow through heavy doughs and batters.

I once sent an e-mail to K'Aid, asking if the K-5SS and K-45SS have metal gears in their transmissions. They wrote me back, saying that those two stand mixers have NYLON gears for their transmissions.

They also said that it's to help protect the motor, for if an abnormal amount of strain is ever placed on the mixer, the gears would strip, but the motor won't wimp out, saving the cost of a new motor over getting the gears replaced.

But in order for the nylon tranny to wimp out, you have to be doing something awfully bad for that to happen. In normal use, the tranny will give many, many, many years of reliable service.

So don't let the "plastic" transmission fool you. It can take it. And K'Aid Stand Mixers, reguardless of the model number, is made to handle bread and cookie dough as well as heavy cake batters.

But the Onyx Black Artisan mixer now has metal gears.
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Old 12-28-2007, 02:40 AM   #36
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Corey123,
I understand the benefits of Nylon vs. Metal gears difference, Nylon acts as a shock absorber when starting the motor. For this reason, KA has built-in a Soft Start Mixing feature on the units with metal gears to reduce the initial overload on the motor.

I wasn't suggesting one is better than the other one, I was just replying to KathyJ question. However, I own a model with metal gears and is the one I'd recommend.

One comment: According to the KA brochure I mentioned, only three mixers have metal gears, and all are bowl-lift type, Artisan is included on the list.

Robgrave,
According to the brochure, there is a bowl-lift model that doesn't have all Metal direct-transmission gears. It is the K5SS, Heavy Duty Stand Mixer.
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Old 12-28-2007, 07:16 AM   #37
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Didn't say that you were.

I just wanted to point out the difference between plastic and nylon. Some
seem to be confusing plastic with nylon, and nylon is much tougher than plastic.

K'Aid wouldn't knowingly or mistakingly use plastic gears in ANY of their stand mixers that I know of.

And yes, the K-5SS DOES use nylon gears. I have that model and the only problem that I had with it is when I used the grinder attachment on it. Otherwise, even though it has nylon gears, it still does the mixing and kneading jobs very well.

Incidently, K'Aid had stopped making this model, but it was brought back under a new model number - the KSM-500. Same motor, same body style, same 5-qt bowl.
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Old 12-28-2007, 09:58 AM   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wysiwyg View Post
Corey123,
I understand the benefits of Nylon vs. Metal gears difference, Nylon acts as a shock absorber when starting the motor. For this reason, KA has built-in a Soft Start Mixing feature on the units with metal gears to reduce the initial overload on the motor.

I wasn't suggesting one is better than the other one, I was just replying to KathyJ question. However, I own a model with metal gears and is the one I'd recommend.

One comment: According to the KA brochure I mentioned, only three mixers have metal gears, and all are bowl-lift type, Artisan is included on the list.

Robgrave,
According to the brochure, there is a bowl-lift model that doesn't have all Metal direct-transmission gears. It is the K5SS, Heavy Duty Stand Mixer.
It is a bit confusing, sorting out all the model options, and which features which gearings. I'm still not sure whether there is a tilt-head model available with the stronger, metal-gear construction, actually. From what I've read, I would imagine many people would prefer it, even if it means a significant price premium.

Of course, it may be that I'm making too much of the difference, but to the extent that it matters to the buyer, wysiwyg's advice makes good sense: get ahold of a KA customer rep and inquire directly about the particular model in question. Just to be sure of what you're paying for.
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Old 12-28-2007, 11:51 AM   #39
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Whether you have nylon or metal gears you still need to make sure not to overload the machine. In the manuals they tell you the maximum amount of flour you can use for your particular model. Ive seen it time and time again people putting to much stess on their mixers.You can hear it when the motor is working too hard its a loud grinding sound and the motor is laboring.Ive only noticed this when people make doughs.Take care of your KA most people never even bother to read the manual.My KA says to never use more then 12 cups all purpose flour or 6 cups of whole wheat flour when making dough with a 5 quart mixer.
If I hear my mixer starting to grind I turn it off immediately and finish by kneading by hand.
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Old 12-28-2007, 12:15 PM   #40
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Yes, you're right!

I believe my K-5SS can use up to about 8 to 9 cups of flour in a bread dough recipe, while the K-45SS uses about 6 to 7 cups of flour.

And yes, I've mentioned that in my post above - for instance, using too much flour in a bread dough recipe.

In true fashion, the instruction manual that came with the older K-45SS says not to make any more than TWO consecutive bread dough recipes, and that the machine MUST be allowed to rest for at least 45 minutes before making another one. If owners are using the mixer more than twice in a row for dough recipes, then, certainly, the machine more than likely will wimp out.

I never make more that one bread dough recipe at a time anyway. But you gotta figure that since the machine was made using nylon gears, that it WILL take this kind of a strain to be able to go twice in a row for a dough recipe.
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