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Old 12-08-2015, 06:50 PM   #11
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Mike,
I have cooked on electric stoves. Just treat it like a regular burner. The only real difference is it won't cool down as fast as gas. Don't worry about the cycling. That is just to keep it from getting too hot. It won't cool down enough to show on the cooking unless you are outside in the Yukon in winter.
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Old 12-08-2015, 06:55 PM   #12
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Hi, Mike.
You'll get the hang of cooking on your new hot plate in no time. There's always a bit of a learning curve for new appliances, large or small. The fact that you're here on a cooking forum and asking questions says you're serious about cooking for yourself with what you've got to work with.

If you were to think about expanding a little and buying yourself an electric skillet, and/or grill (such as a George Foreman), that would open up a whole new world of possibilities for you. Think grilled chicken breasts, bacon, chilis, stews, etc.

I hope you stick around here, you seem like such a nice person.

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_no...ectric+skillet

Amazon.com: george foreman grill - Contact Grills / Small Appliances: Home & Kitchen
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Old 12-08-2015, 07:39 PM   #13
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Cheryl, I'm ordering that particular electric skillet!! It's been years since I've owned one, and this design is so vastly improved!! It will be wonderful for the Christmas buffet table!! http://www.amazon.com/Presto-06857-1...ectric+skillet
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Old 12-08-2015, 08:27 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kayelle View Post
Cheryl, I'm ordering that particular electric skillet!! It's been years since I've owned one, and this design is so vastly improved!! It will be wonderful for the Christmas buffet table!! Amazon.com: Presto 06857 16-inch Electric Foldaway Skillet, Black: Kitchen & Dining
That's a nice one, isn't it? I've been thinking about getting one for the past couple of years - they're certainly better than they used to be back in the day. Between those and the Nesco roasters, there's no reason to not have hot food at holiday buffets or anytime.
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Old 12-08-2015, 08:46 PM   #15
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These electric skillets and griddles are also great for communal type dining.....if you're into that sort of thing...
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Old 12-08-2015, 09:39 PM   #16
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I previously had an old 11" West Bend electric skillet, a 600 watt microwave, and a B&D toaster oven.

I did prepare a couple of meals using the skillet and made a couple of batches of cornbread from a box mix using the toaster oven.

I added the hot plate, Dash egg cooker (not used yet), Aroma 8 cup rice cooker, Hamilton Beach 8 cup processor (shoulda bought the mandolin!) and a 4 quart Crock Pot (also not used yet).

Since then, I bought the Presto 16" 06850 skillet and the Hamilton Beach countertop oven/convection/rotisserie.

I used the hot plate to blanch some cabbage I was going to freeze, then tried to carmalize some onions. That didn't end well, but not so much due to controls.

When they would have been ready, I just turned the hot plate off, but didn't remove the pan. Got distracted with company, and when I went back they were burnt. Second attempt went ok.

I recently fixed my first ever pot of beans from scratch. Seems like way too much trouble.

Using the West Bend, I sliced and browned some beef sausage, then sauted (I think) some onion, celery, and bell pepper with it.

I was satisfied with the accuracy of the countertop oven temp, but so far have only prepared TV dinners and fish sticks (freezer space has become precious and needed to make a little room).

Besides the hot plate, the processor and rice cooker have proved most frustrating.

With the processor, whether I'm chopping, slicing, or shredding, the results appear to be the same. I've reverted to doing bell peppers and onions by hand. Definitely haven't acquired 'the touch' yet.

The rice cooker, admittedly a cheap one, yields a clump of cooked rice. This really hasn't mattered so far, as the rice has always been combined with something else. I guess if I want 'fluffy', I can buy Success.

On my budget, I had counted on beans and rice being staples.

Thursday, I bought some drumsticks, thighs, and a couple of breasts. Also four pork chops. I did brown some breasts recently, then added black beans, corn, and salsa to the skillet. Was actually bland. The next day, I added some homebrew hot sauce from Trinidad to spice it up.

Still have yet to tackle cooking potatoes. Got some reds and Yukons to fix if I get bold enough.

Think the problem is that I'm trying to deal with too many learning curves!
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Old 12-08-2015, 10:03 PM   #17
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Mike your report makes all of us happy. Just keep cooking..
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Old 12-08-2015, 11:01 PM   #18
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Mike,
You can steam stuff in your rice cooker. Yes the rice does clump but you can fluff it up.
Make your beans in the crockpot.
On food processors, remember the slice shred blade has two sides. Also the amount of pressure depends on the cut of the food.
You can pretty much bake anything in your new oven.
And you learned the most important lesson, hot plates do not cool down quickly.
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