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Old 10-08-2007, 01:36 PM   #11
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Yes, what bowlingshirt said. You don't want all that extra grease when making your gravy. Just use what you need.
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Old 10-08-2007, 03:32 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roxy View Post
I read the replys on the question I had about the gravy seperator and how to do it. So is the vote to pour the broth through it and then make the gravy on the stove or make the gravy first, then run it through the gravy separator?

No vote is needed. It doesn't work the second way. It won't separate gravy after it's already made.

There is no such thing as "lean gravy." Gravy is a mixture of fat and liquid with flour or cornstarch as a thickener. Once the fat and liquid have emulsified, you can't use the device to separate them. Likewise, you cant pour some other emulsion like mayonnaise into a gravy separator and drain off the oil.
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Old 10-08-2007, 04:21 PM   #13
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Yep - what jennyema said. As I said before, OXO used a bad choice of words when they said gravy to describe pan drippings.

The only way that I know that you could seperate the grease from a completed gravy would be if it breaks - in which case you would have a ruined gravy.
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Old 10-09-2007, 11:04 AM   #14
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Originally Posted by keltin View Post
Uh, no, I never implied that, but you for some reason you read it in there.

I wanted to know if there was a dish that had critical timing that required this specialized tool. I donít know about you, but I havenít cooked EVERY dish in the world.
If that was not your implication then I apologize.

What might help is if we all stayed on topic. The topic here is how to use a fat separator, not a topic about critical timing of a dish. that would be a topic for another thread.
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Old 10-09-2007, 12:13 PM   #15
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Please tell me this isn't happening again!

There is more than one way to do things. Frankly, if I'm making gravy at Thanksgiving I don't have time to put my drippings in the refrigerator and let them solidify and I seriously doubt that is the preferred method on this particular day so yes, it makes a HUGE difference in the fact it is the perfect tool for the job. I am also not going to pour my hot turkey drippings into a baggie and really don't recommend it. Also, once I reach that grease line it's much easier to control in a separator.

The fat will QUICKLY rise to the top while still warm and you DO need some fat to make the finished product. These gravy/fat separators can serve double duty as a measuring cup too so they are not strictly for fat separating.

Roxy - I hope we haven't scared you off and I hope we answered your question. It probably was a bit confusing at first as to whether you should separate before or after making your gravy - I hope we have now clarified that it is better to separate BEFORE you make the gravy. Your gravy separator will come in handy and it wasn't a wasted purchase and now a few more people know about a gravy separator (I bought mine about 20 years ago so they are not a new invention).
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Old 10-09-2007, 04:27 PM   #16
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Enough is more than enough!

Roxy, the OP, was asking how to use an OXO gravy seperator - not a discussion of alternative methods, or a debate on the pros and cons of other methods - or even if she should buy one or not - she has already bought one and wanted to know how to use it. That is the topic of this thread .... nothing else!

Community Policies - down in the section Before posting, please consider the following:

Please stay on topic within threads. While some posts may naturally lead to other topics of discussion or queries, please either start a new thread or post the question/idea/thought in the appropriate thread or forum.

If you wanted to discuss alternatives to the fat seperator such as zip top bags and SS bowls and time and all that other stuff that had NOTHING to do with the OP's question you should have started a thread to do that. Since you didn't - I've done it for you .... and split all those posts out of this thread and moved them there. You can find your off topic posts in a new thread in this Cook's Tools forum - Alternatives to using a Fat/Gravy Separator? where your comments are on topic.
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Old 10-09-2007, 06:24 PM   #17
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Hormel has got a great page on how to make Turkey Gravy that also shows how to use a gravy separator. It even has pictures of the technique. Nice!
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Old 10-09-2007, 07:56 PM   #18
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That's some good info keltin. I usually make a roux when I make gravy - I like my gravy to take on a bit of color. I will definitely TRY to remember this and make it a sticky at Thanksgiving for those who celebrate in November.
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Old 10-22-2007, 11:26 AM   #19
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Thanks for the help..appreciate it alot:) Will degrease the broth then make the gravy:)
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Old 10-29-2007, 07:23 PM   #20
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Smile Thank Goodness for this thread!!!!

I bought this same seperator yesterday at Bed, Bath and Beyond. It didn't give very good instructions and came across this site. I did as one of the administrators said and I couldn't BELIVE how much fat came off!!! I use just a "little" butter when doing my turkey. We ended off getting 2 14oz cans of fat off. I would have normally used this for my gravy. Needless to say, it was the BEST gravy I have ever made.
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