"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cookware and Accessories > Cookware
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 02-16-2015, 10:55 AM   #1
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,395
Big Heavy Pot or Electric Deep Fryer?

I've had EuroPro deep fryer for some time. It did a fine job but a while back, it died. I've been wondering if I should buy a new electric fryer or switch to using a big heavy pot (I have a 7.5-quart LeCrueset) with a deep fryer thermometer.

Any thoughts???

If I go with a pot and thermometer, digital? bimetal? or bulb type?
__________________

__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2015, 11:09 AM   #2
Executive Chef
 
Selkie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Arkansas
Posts: 3,796
I've had both large and small electric deep fryers, put after using each of those single-purpose devices, I have come to prefer a glazed 6-8 quart Dutch Oven. Being able to adjust the oil level, see the item you're frying against white sides and bottom, and offer a more stable temperature environment (the cast iron temperature doesn't fluctuate as much as a stainless steel tank.) And I can generally fry larger or more pieces than a typical deep fryer can hold at one time.
__________________

__________________
"Food is our common ground, a universal experience." - James Beard
Selkie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2015, 11:20 AM   #3
Wine Guy
 
Steve Kroll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Twin Cities, Minnesota
Posts: 5,419
Admittedly, I don't do a lot of deep frying anymore, but the down side I've found with cast iron is in trying to find the "sweet spot" for frying. I agree the temp is more stable, but that's also what makes it a little more difficult to work with. If the oil is too hot or cold, it takes some playing around and then waiting to get it where you want it.

I've also found the same thing when making cheese, which is kind of a precise science as far as keeping temps stable. The thermometer initially reads where I want it, but then it will start to creep up, at which point I then have to move the pot off the burner, wait until it comes down, then put it back on the burner. I tend to get more responsive changes from my stainless steel stock pot.

Years ago I had a Delonghi fryer I liked. I thought one of the nicest features was the ability to seal the whole thing up when finished, to preserve the oil for the next frying. Obviously there's a relatively short shelf life for oil, but if you're doing frying two or three times a week, it's nice not to have to refill it all the time.

Your mileage may vary, of course.
__________________
Steve Kroll is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2015, 12:53 PM   #4
Master Chef
 
CharlieD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: USA,Minnesota
Posts: 8,404
After two deep fryers died on me, I bough an aluminum pot and insert at Restaurant Supply store. Works like a charm. Let me see if I can add a picture.
Attached Images
  
__________________
You are what you eat.
CharlieD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2015, 02:08 PM   #5
Head Chef
 
RPCookin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Logan County, Colorado
Posts: 2,049
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
I've had EuroPro deep fryer for some time. It did a fine job but a while back, it died. I've been wondering if I should buy a new electric fryer or switch to using a big heavy pot (I have a 7.5-quart LeCrueset) with a deep fryer thermometer.

Any thoughts???

If I go with a pot and thermometer, digital? bimetal? or bulb type?
I use my Thermoworks Chef Alarm digital probe on a pot on the stovetop. The nice thing about the Chef Alarm is that you can set it to alarm for both high and low temperature points, keeping the temp within the range you want. It came with a bracket for clipping the probe to the side of a pot.
__________________
Rick
RPCookin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2015, 03:59 PM   #6
Executive Chef
 
Mad Cook's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: North West England
Posts: 4,170
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
I've had EuroPro deep fryer for some time. It did a fine job but a while back, it died. I've been wondering if I should buy a new electric fryer or switch to using a big heavy pot (I have a 7.5-quart LeCrueset) with a deep fryer thermometer.

Any thoughts???

If I go with a pot and thermometer, digital? bimetal? or bulb type?
I can't remember when I last deep fried anything so perhaps I have a skewed PoV but it seems to me that the big heavy pot would be more useful and, as you already own one, cheaper. However, if you would use it a lot it might be different
__________________
Donít look for the light at the end of the tunnel. Stomp along and switch the bl**dy thing on yourself.
Mad Cook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2015, 04:25 PM   #7
Master Chef
 
jabbur's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Newport News, VA
Posts: 5,482
I use an anodized aluminum pot. Don't use a thermometer. It doesn't have an insert. I just use a slotted spoon to remove the items. I don't deep fry that often so it seems more economical for me to do it this way. I already have a place to store the pot. If I got a fryer, I'd have to find a place to store it! ;)
__________________
I could give up chocolate but I'm no quitter!
jabbur is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2015, 04:54 PM   #8
Head Chef
 
salt and pepper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Montana
Posts: 2,027

__________________
salt and pepper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2015, 06:06 PM   #9
Sous Chef
 
Silversage's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Florida
Posts: 863
I also had a Euro Pro, and it worked great. When it eventually died, I got a different brand, and it was a real PITA. I ended up donating it to the St. Vincent de Paul. Since then, I've used a LeCrueset DO on the stove, and I hate the splatter mess.

Truthfully, I wish I had my old Euro-Pro back. I'm trying not to deep fry as often - the older I get, the harder it is to keep my weight down, so I haven't replaced it. But I'm sorely tempted to. The pan on the stove is a mess after using the deep fryer.
__________________
In our house, dog hair is a condiment!
OMG! I decided to blog!
Silversage is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2015, 06:16 PM   #10
Master Chef
 
Aunt Bea's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: near Mount Pilot
Posts: 7,009
I don't do much deep frying in my kitchen. When I do I prefer to use a pot or pan. Almost any pan in the cupboard can be pressed into service and I like to fit the pan to the task. A deep frying pan for a piece of fish or a small saucepan for a handful of fresh cut french fries is really all I need. Using a pan suited to the task helps me control the amount of oil and washing a pot is IMO easier than washing a deep fryer.
__________________

__________________
Aunt Bea is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
electric

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:04 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.